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A. Kessel [4]Anthony S. Kessel [4]Alisa Kessel [3]
  1.  68
    The 'redefinition of death' debate: Western concepts and western bioethics.Susan Frances Jones & Anthony S. Kessel - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (1):63-75.
    Biomedicine is a global enterprise constructed upon the belief in the universality of scientific truths. However, despite huge scientific advances over recent decades it has not been able to formulate a specific and universal definition of death: In fact, in its attempt to redefine death, the concept of death appears to have become immersed in ever increasing vagueness and ambiguity. Even more worrisome is that bioethics, in the form of principlism, is also endeavouring to become a global enterprise by claiming (...)
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  2. Beyond the 'two-worlds' perspective in medicine.Godelieve Heteren & Anthony S. Kessel - 1995 - Health Care Analysis 3 (4):353-357.
     
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  3.  21
    Moving beyond Mozert: Toward a democratic theory of education.Alisa Kessel - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (13-14):1419-1434.
    Most liberal political theorists of education argue that it is better to teach students to tolerate diversity, than to protect the potentially illiberal commitments of some members of the political communities. In fact, neither approach is wholly satisfying, yet they remain the focus of much political theorizing about education. This article suggests that this misguided focus is, in part, a consequence of a focus, by liberal political theorists of education, upon the 1987 Mozert v. Hawkins court case. Mozert raised serious (...)
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  4.  64
    The cruel optimism of sexual consent.Alisa Kessel - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (3):359-380.
    This article intervenes in a critical debate about the use of consent to distinguish sex from rape. Drawing from critical contract theories, it argues that sexual consent is a cruel optimism that often operates to facilitate, rather than alleviate, sexual violence. Sexual consent as a cruel optimism promises to simplify rape allegations in the popular cultural imagination, confounds the distinction between victims and agents of sexual violence, and establishes certainty for potential victimizers who rely on it to convince themselves and (...)
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  5. Environment, ethics and public health: the climate change dilemma.A. Kessel, C. Stephens & A. Dawson - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics: Key Concepts and Issues in Policy and Practice:154--173.
  6.  52
    Accounting for the Costs of Contact Tracing through Social Networks.J. Littmann & A. Kessel - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (1):51-53.
    This article critically engages with Mandeville et al.'s case discussion of using social networking services for the purposes of contact tracing in infectious disease outbreaks. It will be argued that their discussion may be overstating the utility of such approaches, while simultaneously underestimating the ethical concerns that arise from this method of contact tracing. The article separates between ethical and technological concerns and suggests that due to the particular design of networking sites such as Facebook and the usage patterns of (...)
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  7.  17
    Criminal Law, Philosophy and Public Health Practice.A. M. Viens, John Coggon & Anthony S. Kessel (eds.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    The goal of improving public health involves the use of different tools, with the law being one way to influence the activities of institutions and individuals. Of the regulatory mechanisms afforded by law to achieve this end, criminal law remains a perennial mechanism to delimit the scope of individual and group conduct. However, criminal law may promote or hinder public health goals, and its use raises a number of complex questions that merit exploration. This examination of the interface between criminal (...)
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  8.  34
    Openness with patients: A categorical imperative to correct an imbalance.A. Kessel & Michael J. Crawford - 1997 - Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (3):297-304.
    This paper examines the concept of ‘openness with patients’ from the stand-point of the limitations of biomedical ethics. Initially we review contemporary critiques of bioethics and, in particular, of principlism; we relate how other; somewhat neglected, forms of medical ethics can yield useful information and provide moral guidance. The main section of the paper then shows how a bioethical approach to openness misses the social context in our example, the viewpoints of patients; we present some of the increasing wealth of (...)
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  9.  13
    Un‐contented characters: an education in the shared practices of democratic engagement.Alisa Kessel - 2009 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 12 (3):425-442.
  10.  8
    Beyond the 'two-worlds' perspective in medicine.Godelieve van Heteren & Anthony S. Kessel - 1995 - Health Care Analysis 3 (4):353-357.
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  11.  10
    The views of genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinic users on unlinked anonymous testing for HIV: evidence from a pilot study of clinics in two English cities.J. Datta, A. Kessel, K. Wellings, K. Nanchahal, D. Marks & G. Kinghorn - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (11):668-672.
    A study was undertaken of the views of users of two genitourinary medicine (GUM) clinics in England on unlinked anonymous testing (UAT) for HIV. The UAT programme measures the prevalence of HIV in the population, including undiagnosed prevalence, by testing residual blood (from samples taken for clinical purposes) which is anonymised and irreversibly unlinked from the source. 424 clinic users completed an anonymous questionnaire about their knowledge of, and attitudes towards, UAT. Only 1/7 (14%) were aware that blood left over (...)
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