Results for 'A. H. Gregory'

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  1.  21
    Metrically homogeneous graphs of diameter 3.Daniela A. Amato, Gregory Cherlin & H. Dugald Macpherson - 2021 - Journal of Mathematical Logic 21 (1):2050020.
    We classify countable metrically homogeneous graphs of diameter 3.
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  2.  29
    Ear differences and delayed auditory feedback: Effect on a simple verbal repetition task and a nonverbal tapping test.L. D. Roberts & A. H. Gregory - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (2):269.
  3.  47
    G. L. Possehl's and M. H. Raval's Harappan Civilization and RojdiHarappan Civilization and Rojdi.Walter A. Fairservis, Gregory L. Possehl & M. H. Raval - 1991 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 111 (1):108.
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  4.  27
    Teachers and texts in the ancient world: philosophers, Jews, and Christians.H. Gregory Snyder - 2000 - New York: Routledge.
    Teachers and Texts in the Ancient World presents a comprehensive and accessible survey of religious and philosophical teaching and classroom practices in the ancient world. Snyder synthesizes a wide range of ancient evidence and modern scholarship to address such questions as how the literary practices of Jews and Christians compared to the literary practices of the philosophical schools and whether Christians were particularly noteworthy for their attachment to scripture.
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  5.  19
    Metrically homogeneous graphs of diameter 3.Daniela A. Amato, Gregory Cherlin & H. Dugald Macpherson - 2021 - Journal of Mathematical Logic 21 (1):2050020.
    We classify countable metrically homogeneous graphs of diameter 3.
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  6.  38
    A concurrent validity study of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised and Columbia Mental Maturity Scale.Howard H. Carvajal, Cherri S. Parks, James P. Parks, Robert A. Logan & Gregory L. Page - 1993 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (1):33-34.
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  7.  34
    A recurrent 16p12.1 microdeletion supports a two-hit model for severe developmental delay.Santhosh Girirajan, Jill A. Rosenfeld, Gregory M. Cooper, Francesca Antonacci, Priscillia Siswara, Andy Itsara, Laura Vives, Tom Walsh, Shane E. McCarthy, Carl Baker, Heather C. Mefford, Jeffrey M. Kidd, Sharon R. Browning, Brian L. Browning, Diane E. Dickel, Deborah L. Levy, Blake C. Ballif, Kathryn Platky, Darren M. Farber, Gordon C. Gowans, Jessica J. Wetherbee, Alexander Asamoah, David D. Weaver, Paul R. Mark, Jennifer Dickerson, Bhuwan P. Garg, Sara A. Ellingwood, Rosemarie Smith, Valerie C. Banks, Wendy Smith, Marie T. McDonald, Joe J. Hoo, Beatrice N. French, Cindy Hudson, John P. Johnson, Jillian R. Ozmore, John B. Moeschler, Urvashi Surti, Luis F. Escobar, Dima El-Khechen, Jerome L. Gorski, Jennifer Kussmann, Bonnie Salbert, Yves Lacassie, Alisha Biser, Donna M. McDonald-McGinn, Elaine H. Zackai, Matthew A. Deardorff, Tamim H. Shaikh, Eric Haan, Kathryn L. Friend, Marco Fichera, Corrado Romano, Jozef Gécz, Lynn E. DeLisi, Jonathan Sebat, Mary-Claire King, Lisa G. Shaffer & Eic - unknown
    We report the identification of a recurrent, 520-kb 16p12.1 microdeletion associated with childhood developmental delay. The microdeletion was detected in 20 of 11,873 cases compared with 2 of 8,540 controls and replicated in a second series of 22 of 9,254 cases compared with 6 of 6,299 controls. Most deletions were inherited, with carrier parents likely to manifest neuropsychiatric phenotypes compared to non-carrier parents. Probands were more likely to carry an additional large copy-number variant when compared to matched controls. The clinical (...)
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  8.  9
    Best‐Laid Editorial Plans.Erik Parens, Thomas H. Murray, Karen J. Maschke, Josephine Johnston, Nora Porter, Susan Gilbert, Joyce A. Griffin & Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2012 - Hastings Center Report 38 (6):2-2.
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  9.  12
    An Ecological Perspective of Food Choice and Eating Autonomy Among Adolescents.Amanda M. Ziegler, Christina M. Kasprzak, Tegan H. Mansouri, Arturo M. Gregory, Rachel A. Barich, Lori A. Hatzinger, Lucia A. Leone & Jennifer L. Temple - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Adolescence is an important developmental period marked by a transition from primarily parental-controlled eating to self-directed and peer-influenced eating. During this period, adolescents gain autonomy over their individual food choices and eating behavior in general. While parent-feeding practices have been shown to influence eating behaviors in children, little is known about how these relationships track across adolescent development as autonomy expands. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify factors that impact food decisions and eating autonomy among adolescents. Using (...)
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  10.  21
    Nuclear Weapons and the Future of Humanity: The Fundamental Questions.John P. Holdren, Paul R. Ehrlich, Anne Ehrlich, Gary Stahl, Berel Lang, Richard H. Popkin, Joseph Margolis, Patrick Morgan, John Hare, Russell Hardin, Richard A. Watson, Gregory S. Kavka, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Sidney Axinn, Terry Nardin, Douglas P. Lackey, Jefferson McMahan, Edmund Pellegrino, Stephen Toulmin, Dietrich Fischer, Edward F. McClennen, Louis Rene Beres, Arne Naess, Richard Falk & Milton Fisk - 1986 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The excellent quality and depth of the various essays make [the book] an invaluable resource....It is likely to become essential reading in its field.—CHOICE.
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  11.  22
    Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Consciousness, Ciba Foundation Symposium, no.l74, edited by Gregory R. Bock and Joan Marsh.A. H. Lesser - 1996 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 27 (2):216-217.
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  12.  14
    A cross-cultural investigation into the influence of eye gaze on working memory for happy and angry faces.Samantha E. A. Gregory, Stephen R. H. Langton, Sakiko Yoshikawa & Margaret C. Jackson - 2020 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (8):1561-1572.
    Previous long-term memory research found that angry faces were more poorly recognised when encoded with averted vs. direct gaze, while memory for happy faces was unaffected by gaze. Contrasti...
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  13.  27
    Origins of music in credible signaling.Samuel A. Mehr, Max M. Krasnow, Gregory A. Bryant & Edward H. Hagen - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44:e60.
    Music comprises a diverse category of cognitive phenomena that likely represent both the effects of psychological adaptations that are specific to music (e.g., rhythmic entrainment) and the effects of adaptations for non-musical functions (e.g., auditory scene analysis). How did music evolve? Here, we show that prevailing views on the evolution of music – that music is a byproduct of other evolved faculties, evolved for social bonding, or evolved to signal mate quality – are incomplete or wrong. We argue instead that (...)
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  14.  77
    Music and dance as a coalition signaling system.Edward H. Hagen & Gregory A. Bryant - 2003 - Human Nature 14 (1):21-51.
    Evidence suggests that humans might have neurological specializations for music processing, but a compelling adaptationist account of music and dance is lacking. The sexual selection hypothesis cannot easily account for the widespread performance of music and dance in groups (especially synchronized performances), and the social bonding hypothesis has severe theoretical difficulties. Humans are unique among the primates in their ability to form cooperative alliances between groups in the absence of consanguineal ties. We propose that this unique form of social organization (...)
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  15.  26
    Classical and instrumental eyelid conditioning.Gregory A. Kimble, Lucie I. Mann & Robert H. Dufort - 1955 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 49 (6):407.
  16.  14
    The associative factor in eyelid conditioning.Gregory A. Kimble & Robert H. Dufort - 1956 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 52 (6):386.
  17.  18
    Meaningfulness and isolation as factors in verbal learning.Gregory A. Kimble & Robert H. Dufort - 1955 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 50 (6):361.
  18.  27
    Toward a productive evolutionary understanding of music.Samuel A. Mehr, Max M. Krasnow, Gregory A. Bryant & Edward H. Hagen - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44:e122.
    We discuss approaches to the study of the evolution of music (sect. R1); challenges to each of the two theories of the origins of music presented in the companion target articles (sect. R2); future directions for testing them (sect. R3); and priorities for better understanding the nature of music (sect. R4).
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  19.  10
    Similarity leads to correlated processing: A dynamic model of encoding and recognition of episodic associations.Gregory E. Cox & Amy H. Criss - 2020 - Psychological Review 127 (5):792-828.
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  20.  23
    Hilbert and the emergence of modern mathematical logic.Gregory H. Moore - 1997 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 12 (1):65-90.
    Hilbert’s unpublished 1917 lectures on logic, analyzed here, are the beginning of modern metalogic. In them he proved the consistency and Post-completeness (maximal consistency) of propositional logic -results traditionally credited to Bernays (1918) and Post (1921). These lectures contain the first formal treatment of first-order logic and form the core of Hilbert’s famous 1928 book with Ackermann. What Bernays, influenced by those lectures, did in 1918 was to change the emphasis from the consistency and Post-completeness of a logic to its (...)
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  21.  20
    Prosody in spontaneous humor: Evidence for encryption.Thomas Flamson, Gregory A. Bryant & H. Clark Barrett - 2011 - Pragmatics and Cognition 19 (2):248-267.
    The study of conversational humor has received relatively little empirical attention with almost no examinations of the role of vocal signals in spontaneous humor production. Here we report an analysis of spontaneous humorous speech in a rural Brazilian collective farm. The sample was collected over the course of ethnographic fieldwork in northeastern Brazil, and is drawn specifically from the monthly communal business meetings conducted in Portuguese. Our analyses focused on humorous utterances identified by the subsequent presence of laughter. Acoustic features (...)
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  22. Beyond first-order logic: the historical interplay between mathematical logic and axiomatic set theory.Gregory H. Moore - 1980 - History and Philosophy of Logic 1 (1-2):95-137.
    What has been the historical relationship between set theory and logic? On the one hand, Zermelo and other mathematicians developed set theory as a Hilbert-style axiomatic system. On the other hand, set theory influenced logic by suggesting to Schröder, Löwenheim and others the use of infinitely long expressions. The questions of which logic was appropriate for set theory - first-order logic, second-order logic, or an infinitary logic - culminated in a vigorous exchange between Zermelo and Gödel around 1930.
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  23.  17
    Changes in response strength with changes in the amount of reinforcement.Robert H. Dufort & Gregory A. Kimble - 1956 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (3):185.
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  24.  9
    Sind: A General Introduction.Gregory L. Possehl & H. T. Lambrick - 1977 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 97 (3):385.
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  25.  13
    Ready signals and the effect of interpolated UCS presentations in eyelid conditioning.Robert H. Dufort & Gregory A. Kimble - 1958 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (1):1.
  26.  23
    Vocal Emotion Recognition Across Disparate Cultures.Gregory Bryant & H. Clark Barrett - 2008 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 8 (1-2):135-148.
    There exists substantial cultural variation in how emotions are expressed, but there is also considerable evidence for universal properties in facial and vocal affective expressions. This is the first empirical effort examining the perception of vocal emotional expressions across cultures with little common exposure to sources of emotion stimuli, such as mass media. Shuar hunter-horticulturalists from Amazonian Ecuador were able to reliably identify happy, angry, fearful and sad vocalizations produced by American native English speakers by matching emotional spoken utterances to (...)
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  27.  7
    Technology--Humanism or Nihilism: A Critical Analysis of the Philosophical Basis and Practice of Modern Technology.Gregory H. Davis - 1981 - Upa.
    To find more information on Rowman & Littlefield titles, please visit us at www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
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  28.  20
    Plea for a Collective Genetics.Grégory Cormann & John H. Gillespie - 2023 - Sartre Studies International 29 (1):1-21.
    The study of the early manuscripts of the great authors most often becomes a process of monumentalising or (re)legitimising their work. The recent publication of two of Sartre's early manuscripts – first Empédocle (Empedocles) in 2016 and second, in 2018, his dissertation for his graduate diploma (diplôme d’études supérieures or DES), L'Image dans la vie psychologique (The Image in Psychological Life), both texts written in 1926–1927 – encourages us to propose another type of genetic reading that insists on the collective (...)
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  29.  32
    The effect of grade level on WISC-R IQs of 6-year-olds.Howard H. Carvajal, Larry A. Roth, Cooper B. Holmes & Gregory L. Page - 1992 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (4):317-318.
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  30.  34
    The Ethics of Synthetic Biology: Next Steps and Prior Questions.Gregory E. Kaebnick, Michael K. Gusmano & Thomas H. Murray - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (S5):4-26.
    A majority opinion seems to have emerged in scholarly analysis of the assortment of technologies that have been given the label “synthetic biology.” According to this view, society should allow the technology to proceed and even provide it some financial support, while monitor­ing its progress and attempting to ensure that the development leads to good outcomes. The near‐consensus is captured by the U.S. Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues in its report New Directions: The Ethics of Synthetic Biology (...)
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  31.  43
    Synthetic Biology and Morality: Artificial Life and the Bounds of Nature.Gregory E. Kaebnick & Thomas H. Murray (eds.) - 2013 - Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press.
    A range of views on the morality of synthetic biology and its place in public policy and political discourse.
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  32.  8
    Means Without End: A Critical Survey of the Ideological Genealogy of Technology Without Limits, From Apollonian Techne to Postmodern Technoculture.Gregory H. Davis - 2006 - Upa.
    Starting with the Apollonian Greek theory of techne, Means Without End presents a history of transformations of ideas about technology, viewed within their broader philosophical, theological, and scientific contexts. Critically focusing on the ideological genealogy of technology without limits and finding its cultural roots in Christian theology, it details ideological developments in the Renaissance, Enlightenment, and 19th century which prepared the way for a theory of autonomous technology and for postmodern technoculture in the 20th century.
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  33.  24
    Enacted Others: Specifying Goffman's Phenomenological Omissions and Sociological Accomplishments.Gregory W. H. Smith - 2005 - Human Studies 28 (4):397-415.
    Erving Goffman's distinctive contribution to an understanding of others was grounded in his information control and ritual models of the interaction process. This contribution centered on the forms of the interaction order rather than self-other relations as traditionally conceived in phenomenology. Goffman came to phenomenology as a sympathetic but critical outsider who sought resources for the sociological mining of the interaction order. His engagement with phenomenological thinkers (principally Gustav Ichheiser, Jean-Paul Sartre and Alfred Schutz) has to be understood in these (...)
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  34.  81
    The origins of zermelo's axiomatization of set theory.Gregory H. Moore - 1978 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 7 (1):307 - 329.
    What gave rise to Ernst Zermelo's axiomatization of set theory in 1908? According to the usual interpretation, Zermelo was motivated by the set-theoretic paradoxes. This paper argues that Zermelo was primarily motivated, not by the paradoxes, but by the controversy surrounding his 1904 proof that every set can be wellordered, and especially by a desire to preserve his Axiom of Choice from its numerous critics. Here Zermelo's concern for the foundations of mathematics diverged from Bertrand Russell's on the one hand (...)
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  35. The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell, Volume 3: Toward the 'Principles of Mathematics' 1900-02.Gregory H. Moore (ed.) - 1994 - Routledge.
    This volume shows Russell in transition from a neo-Kantian and neo-Hegelian philosopher to an analytic philosopher of the first rank. During this period his research centred on writing The Principles of Mathematics where he drew together previously unpublished drafts. These shed light on Russell's paradox. This material will alter previous accounts of how he discovered his paradox and the related paradox of the largest cardinal. The volume also includes a previously unpublished draft of an early attempt to solve his paradox, (...)
     
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  36.  6
    The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell, Volume 5: Toward Principia Mathematica, 1905–08.Gregory H. Moore (ed.) - 2014 - Routledge.
    This volume of Bertrand Russell's _Collected Papers_ finds Russell focused on writing _Principia Mathematica_ during 1905–08. Eight previously unpublished papers shed light on his different versions of a substitutional theory of logic, with its elimination of classes and relations, during 1905-06. A recurring issue for him was whether a type hierarchy had to be part of a substitutional theory. In mid-1907 he began writing up the final version of _Principia_, now using a ramified theory of types, and eleven unpublished drafts (...)
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  37.  59
    Reasoning with uncertain categories.Gregory L. Murphy, Stephanie Y. Chen & Brian H. Ross - 2012 - Thinking and Reasoning 18 (1):81 - 117.
    Five experiments investigated how people use categories to make inductions about objects whose categorisation is uncertain. Normatively, they should consider all the categories the object might be in and use a weighted combination of information from all the categories: bet-hedging. The experiments presented people with simple, artificial categories and asked them to make an induction about a new object that was most likely in one category but possibly in another. The results showed that the majority of people focused on the (...)
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  38.  68
    Historians and Philosophers of Logic: Are They Compatible? The Bolzano-Weierstrass Theorem as a Case Study.Gregory H. Moore - 1999 - History and Philosophy of Logic 20 (3-4):169-180.
    This paper combines personal reminiscences of the philosopher John Corcoran with a discussion of certain conflicts between historians of logic and philosophers of logic. Some mistaken claims about the history of the Bolzano-Weierstrass Theorem are analyzed in detail and corrected.
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  39.  54
    A response to Brown: The role of LAMP in content and assessment of teaching.Gregory J. Marchant, Melinda K. Schoenfeldt & James H. Powell - 2013 - Journal of Social Studies Research 37 (3):181-182.
  40.  19
    Adding Resolution to an Old Problem: Eye Movements as a Measure of Visual Search.Gregory J. Zelinsky1 Rajesh Pn Rao, Mary M. Hayhoe & Dana H. Ballard - 1996 - In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of The Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 57.
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  41.  9
    Democratic Governance and International Law.Gregory H. Fox & Brad R. Roth (eds.) - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    Prior to the end of the Cold War, the word 'democracy' was rarely used by international lawyers. Few international organisations supported democratic governance, and the criteria for recognition of governments took little account of whether regimes enjoyed a popular mandate. But the events of 1989–1991 profoundly shook old assumptions. Democratic Governance and International Law attempts to assess international law's new-found interest in fostering transitions to democracy. Is an entitlement to democratic government now emerging in international law? If so, what are (...)
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  42.  23
    How Can We Best Think about an Emerging Technology?Gregory E. Kaebnick, Michael K. Gusmano & Thomas H. Murray - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (S5):2-3.
    How should we think about synthetic biology—about the potential benefits and risks of these applications as well as the very idea of designed, extensively genetically modi­fied organisms? The lead article in this report sets out our thinking, but the article is rounded out with nine commentaries that sometimes expand on and sometimes argue with our perspective. Jonathan Wolff, a philosopher at the University College of London and a member of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, and Mark Bedau, a philosopher at (...)
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  43.  8
    Changes in the discourse of Hustler: A study of rhetoric, vocabularies of motive, and ideology.Gregory H. Wilmoth - 1982 - Semiotica 39 (3-4).
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  44.  6
    The puzzle and persistence of biglaw clustering.Gregory H. Shill - 2022 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 23 (1):191-218.
    Elite U.S.-based global law firms concentrate in the costliest districts of superstar cities, especially two neighborhoods in Manhattan. This pattern has persisted despite both the dispersal of Biglaw clients across less-dense, lower-cost U.S. geographies and the development of telework capacity. It suggests a puzzle: law is among the occupations most conducive to remote work, yet Biglaw prior to the coronavirus pandemic required in-person work in the priciest places—meaning it paid a premium on both of its biggest expenses, wages and real (...)
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  45.  55
    Lineage, Sex, and Wealth as Moderators of Kin Investment.Gregory D. Webster, Angela Bryan, Charles B. Crawford, Lisa McCarthy & Brandy H. Cohen - 2008 - Human Nature 19 (2):189-210.
    Supporting Hamilton’s inclusive fitness theory, archival analyses of inheritance patterns in wills have revealed that people invest more of their estates in kin of closer genetic relatedness. Recent classroom experiments have shown that this genetic relatedness effect is stronger for relatives of direct lineage (children, grandchildren) than for relatives of collateral lineage (siblings, nieces, nephews). In the present research, multilevel modeling of more than 1,000 British Columbian wills revealed a positive effect of genetic relatedness on proportions of estates allocated to (...)
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  46.  5
    The Uniqueness of Jesus Christ in the Theocentric Model of the Christian Theolog: The Christian Theology of World Religions: An Elaboration and Evaluation of the Position of John Hick.Gregory H. Carruthers - 1990 - Upa.
    Offers a critical evaluation of the foundational assumptions and claims, scriptural, theological and philosophical, of John Hick's theocentric critique of the Christian affirmation of Jesus' uniqueness.
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  47.  14
    Breaking Historical Silence through Cross–Cultural Collaboration: Latvian Curriculum Writers and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Fellows.Gregory E. Hamot, David H. Lindquist & Thomas J. Misco - 2007 - Educational Studies 42 (2):155-173.
    In response to the need for Holocaust curricula in Latvia, Latvians and Americans worked collaboratively to overcome the historical silence surrounding this event. During their project, Latvian curriculum writers worked with teachers and scholars at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. This descriptive analysis of the Latvians' experience with Museum Fellows revealed opportunities to learn from each other the complexities of teaching the Holocaust in a country viewed by some as collaborators and still somewhat anti-Semitic. Findings included depth of guidance, (...)
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  48.  43
    An Evaluation of Machine-Learning Methods for Predicting Pneumonia Mortality.Gregory F. Cooper, Constantin F. Aliferis, Richard Ambrosino, John Aronis, Bruce G. Buchanon, Richard Caruana, Michael J. Fine, Clark Glymour, Geoffrey Gordon, Barbara H. Hanusa, Janine E. Janosky, Christopher Meek, Tom Mitchell, Thomas Richardson & Peter Spirtes - unknown
    This paper describes the application of eight statistical and machine-learning methods to derive computer models for predicting mortality of hospital patients with pneumonia from their findings at initial presentation. The eight models were each constructed based on 9847 patient cases and they were each evaluated on 4352 additional cases. The primary evaluation metric was the error in predicted survival as a function of the fraction of patients predicted to survive. This metric is useful in assessing a model’s potential to assist (...)
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  49.  22
    Playing by pair‐rules?Gregory K. Davis & Nipam H. Patel - 2003 - Bioessays 25 (5):425-429.
    Although in Drosophila pair‐rule genes play crucial roles in the genetic hierarchy that subdivides the embryo into segments, the extent to which pair‐rule patterning is utilized by different arthropods and other segmented phyla is unknown. Recent data of Dearden et al.1 and Henry et al.,2 however, hint that a pair‐rule mechanism might play a role in the segmentation process of basal arthropods and vertebrates. BioEssays 25:425–429, 2003. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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  50.  22
    José Ferreirós. Labyrinth of Thought: A History of Set Theory and Its Role in Modern Mathematics. xxv + 466 pp., illus. Second revised edition. Basel/Boston: Birkhäuser, 2007. $79.95. [REVIEW]Gregory H. Moore - 2010 - Isis 101 (4):895-896.
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