7 found
Order:
See also
A. G. Holdier
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
  1. The Pig’s Squeak: Towards a Renewed Aesthetic Argument for Veganism.A. G. Holdier - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (4):631-642.
    In 1906, Henry Stephens Salt published a short collection of essays that presented several rhetorically powerful, if formally deficient arguments for the vegetarian position. By interpreting Salt as a moral sentimentalist with ties to Aristotelian virtue ethics, I propose that his aesthetic argument deserves contemporary consideration. First, I connect ethics and aesthetics with the Greek concepts of kalon and kalokagathia that depend equally on beauty and morality before presenting Salt’s assertion: slaughterhouses are disgusting, therefore they should not be promoted. I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  11
    Comments on “Is Annihilation More Severe than Eternal Conscious Torment?”.A. G. Holdier - 2022 - Southwest Philosophy Review 38 (2):43-45.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Complex Question.A. G. Holdier - 2018 - In Robert Arp, Steven Barbone & Michael Bruce (eds.), Bad Arguments. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 314–316.
    This chapter focuses on one of the common fallacies in Western philosophy called 'complex question (CQ)'. The fallacy of the CQ appears in two varieties. The implicit form distracts an interlocutor by assuming the truth of an unproven premise and shifting the focus of the argument in an unfounded direction. While the explicit form collapses two distinct questions into a single question such that a single answer would appear to satisfy both inquiries. The possibility that an undetected CQ might lead (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  2
    Chronological Snobbery.A. G. Holdier - 2018 - In Robert Arp, Steven Barbone & Michael Bruce (eds.), Bad Arguments. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 311–313.
    This chapter focuses on one of the common fallacies in Western philosophy: chronological snobbery (CS). First described by the Christian academic Owen Barfield in the 1920s and later popularized by his friend and colleague C.S. Lewis, the fallacy of CS presupposes that cultural, philosophical, or scientific ideas from later time periods are necessarily superior to those from earlier ages. Grounded on the Enlightenment's concept of “progress”, this informal fallacy stems from the assumption that the ever‐increasing amount of knowledge in society (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  3
    Should You Eat Baby Yoda?A. G. Holdier - 2023 - In Jason T. Eberl & Kevin S. Decker (eds.), Star Wars and Philosophy Strikes Back. Hoboken, NJ, USA: Wiley. pp. 199–208.
    Some moral sentimentalists say that ethical judgments just are our affective responses to the world and do not necessarily refer to or reflect anything beyond those emotional experiences. Moral sentimentalism tries to take seriously the psychological mechanisms that underwrite our making moral judgments. Moral sentimentalists treat feelings, or affective attitudes, as important components of moral theorizing and decision‐making. Fortunately, moral sentimentalists have a better option for measuring the appropriateness of our ethical feelings. Scottish philosopher Adam Smith's 1759 book The Theory (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  35
    Playing with your heart?: Patrick Jagoda: Experimental games: critique, play, and design in the age of gamification. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 320 pp, $27.50 PB. [REVIEW]A. G. Holdier - 2021 - Metascience 30 (3):483-486.
  7.  10
    Book Review: T.J. Kasperbauer, Subhuman: The Moral Psychology of Human Attitudes to Animals. [REVIEW]A. G. Holdier - 2021 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 18 (2):206-209.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark