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Alan Bleakley [9]A. Bleakley [1]
  1.  25
    He Drove Forward with a Yell: Anger in Medicine and Homer.A. Bleakley, R. Marshall & D. Levine - 2014 - Medical Humanities 40 (1):22-30.
    We use Homer and Sun Tzu as a background to better understand and reformulate confrontation, anger and violence in medicine, contrasting an unproductive ‘love of war’ with a productive ‘art of war’ or ‘art of strategy’. At first glance, it is a paradox that the healing art is not pacific, but riddled with militaristic language and practices. On closer inspection, we find good reasons for this cultural paradox yet regret its presence. Drawing on insights from Homer's The Iliad and The (...)
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  2.  44
    Lost in Translation. Homer in English; the Patient's Story in Medicine.Robert J. Marshall & Alan Bleakley - 2013 - Medical Humanities 39 (1):47-52.
    Next SectionIn a series of previous articles, we have considered how we might reconceptualise central themes in medicine and medical education through ‘thinking with Homer’. This has involved using textual approaches, scenes and characters from the Iliad and Odyssey for rethinking what is a ‘communication skill’, and what do we mean by ‘empathy’ in medical practice; in what sense is medical practice formulaic, like a Homeric ‘song’; and what is lyrical about medical practice. Our approach is not to historicise medicine (...)
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  3.  26
    Toward an Aesthetic Medicine: Developing a Core Medical Humanities Undergraduate Curriculum. [REVIEW]Alan Bleakley, Robert Marshall & Rainer Brömer - 2006 - Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (4):197-213.
    The medical humanities are often implemented in the undergraduate medicine curriculum through injection of discrete option courses as compensation for an overdose of science. The medical humanities may be reformulated as process and perspective, rather than content, where the curriculum is viewed as an aesthetic text and learning as aesthetic and ethical identity formation. This article suggests that a “humanities” perspective may be inherent to the life sciences required for study of medicine. The medical humanities emerge as a revelation of (...)
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  4.  28
    The Medical Humanities Today: Humane Health Care or Tool of Governance? [REVIEW]Alan Petersen, Alan Bleakley, Rainer Brömer & Rob Marshall - 2008 - Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (1):1-4.
    The medical humanities have been presented as a panacea for medical reductionism; a means for ‘humanizing’ medicine. However, there is a lack of consensus about the appropriate contributing disciplines and how curricula should be taught and assessed. This special issue critically examines the role of the medical humanities in medical education and their potential to serve, inadvertently or otherwise, as a tool of governance. The contributors, who include medical educators and medical practitioners, employ a range of perspectives for analysing the (...)
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  5.  37
    Who Can Resist Foucault?Alan Bleakley & John Bligh - unknown
    Michel Foucault's analysis of "the birth of the clinic" describes the genesis of a unified discourse that, in retrospect, has shaped western medicine for two centuries. However, in looking prospectively toward a 21st century medicine, Foucault's analysis is necessary but not sufficient. To better critically address medicine and medical education in the era of simulation, we could draw on frameworks developed by futurists such as Jean Baudrillard. Foucault's analysis does not account for contemporary, complex developments of the clinical gaze as (...)
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  6.  22
    Blunting Occam's Razor: Aligning Medical Education with Studies of Complexity.Alan Bleakley - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (4):849-855.
  7.  50
    A Common Body of Care: The Ethics and Politics of Teamwork in the Operating Theater Are Inseparable.Alan Bleakley - 2006 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (3):305 – 322.
    In the operating theater, the micro-politics of practice, such as interpersonal communications, are central to patient safety and are intimately tied with values as well as knowledge and skills. Team communication is a shared and distributed work activity. In an era of "professionalism," that must now encompass "interprofessionalism," a virtue ethics framework is often invoked to inform practice choices, with reference to phronesis or practical wisdom. However, such a framework is typically cast in individualistic terms as a character trait, rather (...)
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  8.  12
    Seven Types of Ambiguity in Evaluating the Impact of Humanities Provision in Undergraduate Medicine Curricula.Alan Bleakley - 2015 - Journal of Medical Humanities 36 (4):337-357.
    Inclusion of the humanities in undergraduate medicine curricula remains controversial. Skeptics have placed the burden of proof of effectiveness upon the shoulders of advocates, but this may lead to pursuing measurement of the immeasurable, deflecting attention away from the more pressing task of defining what we mean by the humanities in medicine. While humanities input can offer a fundamental critical counterweight to a potentially reductive biomedical science education, a new wave of thinking suggests that the kinds of arts and humanities (...)
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  9.  5
    Sing, Muse: Songs in Homer and in Hospital.Robert Marshall & Alan Bleakley - 2011 - Medical Humanities 37 (1):27-33.
    This paper progresses the original argument of Richard Ratzan that formal presentation of the medical case history follows a Homeric oral-formulaic tradition. The everyday work routines of doctors involve a ritual poetics, where the language of recounting the patient's ‘history’ offers an explicitly aesthetic enactment or performance that can be appreciated and given meaning within the historical tradition of Homeric oral poetry and the modernist aesthetic of Minimalism. This ritual poetics shows a reliance on traditional word usages that crucially act (...)
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  10.  8
    Doctors as Connoisseurs of Informational Images: Aesthetic and Ethical Self-Forming Through Medical Practice.Alan Bleakley - 2004 - In Jerome Satterthwaite, Elizabeth Atkinson & Wendy Martin (eds.), Educational Counter-Cultures: Confrontations, Images, Vision. Trentham Books. pp. 3--149.
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