Results for 'A. Bart Bijnen'

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  1.  30
    Possible solutions for barriers in incident reporting by residents.Kartinie Martowirono, José D. Jansma, Scheltus J. van Luijk, Cordula Wagner & A. Bart Bijnen - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (1):76-81.
  2.  12
    Surgical residents' perceptions of patient safety climate in Dutch teaching hospitals.Kartinie Martowirono, Cordula Wagner & A. Bart Bijnen - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (2):121-128.
  3.  27
    Too Depleted to Turn In: The Relevance of End-of-the-Day Resource Depletion for Reducing Bedtime Procrastination.Bart A. Kamphorst, Sanne Nauts, Denise T. D. De Ridder & Joel H. Anderson - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  4.  10
    Model-preference default theories.Bart Selman & Henry A. Kautz - 1990 - Artificial Intelligence 45 (3):287-322.
  5.  20
    Finding Wealth in Waste: Irreplicability Re‐Examined.Bart Penders & A. Cecile J. W. Janssens - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (12):1800173.
    Irreplicability is framed as crisis, blamed on sloppy science motivated by perverse stimuli in research. Structural changes to the organization of science, targeting sloppy science (e.g., open data, pre‐registration), are proposed to prevent irreplicability. While there is an unquestionable link between sloppy science and failures to replicate/reproduce scientific studies, they are currently conflated. This position can be understood as a result of the erosion of the role of theory in science. The history, sociology, and philosophy of science reveal alternative explanations (...)
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  6. International Legal Approaches to Neurosurgery for Psychiatric Disorders.Jennifer A. Chandler, Laura Y. Cabrera, Paresh Doshi, Shirley Fecteau, Joseph J. Fins, Salvador Guinjoan, Clement Hamani, Karen Herrera-Ferrá, C. Michael Honey, Judy Illes, Brian H. Kopell, Nir Lipsman, Patrick J. McDonald, Helen S. Mayberg, Roland Nadler, Bart Nuttin, Albino J. Oliveira-Maia, Cristian Rangel, Raphael Ribeiro, Arleen Salles & Hemmings Wu - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
    Neurosurgery for psychiatric disorders, also sometimes referred to as psychosurgery, is rapidly evolving, with new techniques and indications being investigated actively. Many within the field have suggested that some form of guidelines or regulations are needed to help ensure that a promising field develops safely. Multiple countries have enacted specific laws regulating NPD. This article reviews NPD-specific laws drawn from North and South America, Asia and Europe, in order to identify the typical form and contents of these laws and to (...)
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  7.  31
    Boekbesprekingen.Bart J. Koet, Martin Parmentier, Carlo Leget, J. Visser, K. W. Jager, Arie L. Molendijk, Arthur Cools, A. H. C. van Eijk, M. F. M. van den Berk, Paul Schotsmans & Walter Van Herck - 1999 - Bijdragen 60 (1):93-116.
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  8.  12
    Hard problems for simple default logics.Henry A. Kautz & Bart Selman - 1991 - Artificial Intelligence 49 (1-3):243-279.
  9. Unbelievable Errors: An Error Theory About All Normative Judgments.Bart Streumer - 2017 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    Unbelievable Errors defends an error theory about all normative judgements: not just moral judgements, but also judgements about reasons for action, judgements about reasons for belief, and instrumental normative judgements. This theory states that normative judgements are beliefs that ascribe normative properties, but that normative properties do not exist. It therefore entails that all normative judgements are false. -/- Bart Streumer also argues, however, that we cannot believe this error theory. This may seem to be a problem for the (...)
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  10.  29
    Should Uplifting Music and Smart Phone Apps Count as Willpower Doping? The Extended Will and the Ethics of Enhanced Motivation.Joel Anderson & Bart A. Kamphorst - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (1):35-37.
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  11.  48
    Ethical Criteria for Health-Promoting Nudges: A Case-by-Case Analysis.Bart Engelen - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (5):48-59.
    Health-promoting nudges have been put into practice by different agents, in different contexts and with different aims. This article formulates a set of criteria that enables a thorough ethical evaluation of such nudges. As such, it bridges the gap between the abstract, theoretical debates among academics and the actual behavioral interventions being implemented in practice. The criteria are derived from arguments against nudges, which allegedly disrespect nudgees, as these would impose values on nudgees and/or violate their rationality and autonomy. Instead (...)
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  12.  20
    Towards the Integration of Individual and Moral Agencies.Ross A. McDonald & Bart Victor - 1988 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 7 (3):103-118.
  13. 10. Richard Joyce, The Myth of Morality Richard Joyce, The Myth of Morality (pp. 182-184).Kevin A. Ameriks, Tad R. Brennan, Ann E. Cudd, Kirk A. Greer, Bart Gruzalski, David P. McCabe, John McCumber, Richard Sherlock & Ira J. Singer - 2003 - Ethics 114 (1).
     
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  14.  21
    A new definition of and role for preferences in positive economics.Bart Engelen - 2017 - Journal of Economic Methodology 24 (3):254-273.
    Positive economic models aim to provide truthful explanations of significant economic phenomena. While the notion of ‘preferences’ figures prominently in micro-economic models, it suffers from a remarkable lack of conceptual clarity and rigor. After distinguishing narrow homo economicus models from broader ones and rehearsing the criticisms both have met, I go into the most promising attempt to date at addressing them, developed by Hausman. However, his definition of preferences as ‘total comparative evaluations’, I argue, plays into the general disregard that (...)
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  15.  13
    A Reaction to Critique from the Epistemological Sidelines.Bart Garssen - 2024 - Informal Logic 44 (1):527-542.
    In this paper, a reaction is presented to Siegel’s claim that the pragma-dialectical theory of argumentation ignores or neglects epistemological viewpoints that he finds vital to any normative theory of argumentation. The focus is on the most important problems in Siegel’s argument: 1) the ambiguity of the term ‘argument’ and the alleged negligence of this ambiguity in pragma-dialectics; 2) the critical rational perspective of the pragma-dialectical account; and 3) the alleged negligence of the “abstract propositional sense” of argument in pragma-dialectics.
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  16.  10
    A neural efficiency hypothesis of age-related changes in human working memory performance.Bart Rypma - 2007 - In Naoyuki Osaka, Robert H. Logie & Mark D'Esposito (eds.), The Cognitive Neuroscience of Working Memory. Oxford University Press. pp. 281--303.
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  17.  87
    Children’s first and second-order false-belief reasoning in a verbal and a low-verbal task.Bart Hollebrandse, Angeliek van Hout & Petra Hendriks - 2014 - Synthese 191 (3).
    We can understand and act upon the beliefs of other people, even when these conflict with our own beliefs. Children’s development of this ability, known as Theory of Mind, typically happens around age 4. Research using a looking-time paradigm, however, established that toddlers at the age of 15 months old pass a non-verbal false-belief task (Onishi and Baillargeon in Science 308:255–258, 2005). This is well before the age at which children pass any of the verbal false-belief tasks. In this study (...)
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  18. Children's first and second-order false-belief reasoning in a verbal and a low-verbal task.Bart Hollebrandse, Angeliek Hout & Petra Hendriks - 2014 - Synthese 191 (3).
    We can understand and act upon the beliefs of other people, even when these conflict with our own beliefs. Children’s development of this ability, known as Theory of Mind, typically happens around age 4. Research using a looking-time paradigm, however, established that toddlers at the age of 15 months old pass a non-verbal false-belief task (Onishi and Baillargeon in Science 308:255–258, 2005). This is well before the age at which children pass any of the verbal false-belief tasks. In this study (...)
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  19. Ecological Innovation: Biomimicry as a New Way of Thinking and Acting Ecologically.Vincent Blok & Bart Gremmen - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (2):203-217.
    In this article, we critically reflect on the concept of biomimicry. On the basis of an analysis of the concept of biomimicry in the literature and its philosophical origin, we distinguish between a strong and a weaker concept of biomimicry. The strength of the strong concept of biomimicry is that nature is seen as a measure by which to judge the ethical rightness of our technological innovations, but its weakness is found in questionable presuppositions. These presuppositions are addressed by the (...)
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  20.  62
    Quantity implicatures.Bart Geurts - 2010 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Gricean pragmatics. Saying vs. implicating ; Discourse and cooperation ; Conversational implicatures ; Generalised vs. particularised ; Cancellability ; Gricean reasoning and the pragmatics of what is said -- The standard recipe for Q-implicatures. The standard recipe ; Inference to the best explanation ; Weak implicatures and competence ; Relevance ; Conclusion -- Scalar implicatures. Horn scales and the generative view ; Implicatures and downward entailing environments ; Disjunction : exclusivity and ignorance ; Conclusion -- Psychological plausibility. Charges of psychological (...)
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  21.  35
    Presuppositions and pronouns.Bart Geurts - 1999 - New York: Elsevier.
    In this volume, Geurts takes discourse representation theory (DRT), and turns it into a unified account of anaphora and presupposition, which he applies not only to the standard problem cases but also to the interpretation of modal expressions, attitude reports, and proper names. The resulting theory, for all its simplicity, is without doubt the most comprehensive of its kind to date. The central idea underlying Geurts' 'binding theory' of presupposition is that anaphora is just a special case of presupposition projection. (...)
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  22. Ecological Innovation: Biomimicry as a New Way of Thinking and Acting Ecologically.Vincent Blok & Bart Gremmen - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (2):203-217.
    In this article, we critically reflect on the concept of biomimicry. On the basis of an analysis of the concept of biomimicry in the literature and its philosophical origin, we distinguish between a strong and a weaker concept of biomimicry. The strength of the strong concept of biomimicry is that nature is seen as a measure by which to judge the ethical rightness of our technological innovations, but its weakness is found in questionable presuppositions. These presuppositions are addressed by the (...)
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  23.  11
    Hegel and resistance: history, politics and dialectics.Bart Zantvoort & Rebecca Comay (eds.) - 2018 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    The concept of resistance has always been central to the reception of Hegel's philosophy. The prevalent image of Hegel's system, which continues to influence the scholarship to this day, is that of an absolutist, monist metaphysics which overcomes all resistance, sublating or assimilating all differences into a single organic 'Whole'. For that reason, the reception of Hegel has always been marked by the question of how to resist Hegel: how to think that which remains outside of or other to the (...)
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  24.  22
    From Argument Schemes to Argumentative Relations in the Wild: A Variety of Contributions to Argumentation Theory.Bart Garssen & Frans van Eemeren (eds.) - 2019 - Cham, Switzerland: Springer Verlag.
    This volume comprises a selection of contributions to the theorizing about argumentation that have been presented at the 9th conference of the International Society for the Study of Argumentation, held in Amsterdam in July 2018. The chapters included provide a general theoretical perspective on central topics in argumentation theory, such as argument schemes and the fallacies. Some contributions concentrate on the treatment of the concept of conductive argument. Other contributions are dedicated to specific issues such as the justification of questions, (...)
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  25.  13
    Against the Secret Ballot: Toward a New Proposal for Open Voting.Bart Engelen & Thomas Nys - 2013 - Acta Politica 48 (4):490-507.
    The secret ballot is considered a central feature of free and fair elections all over the world. While the reasons to uphold it seem to be overwhelming, we argue that the secret ballot is only second-best at best and that a modified version of open voting might prove to be more democratic. Instead of denying the various problems and difficulties that an open system might encounter, we want to offer a genuine proposal that can avoid these numerous pitfalls. After rehearsing (...)
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  26. Can We Believe the Error Theory?Bart Streumer - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy 110 (4):194-212.
    According to the error theory, normative judgements are beliefs that ascribe normative properties, even though such properties do not exist. In this paper, I argue that we cannot believe the error theory, and that this means that there is no reason for us to believe this theory. It may be thought that this is a problem for the error theory, but I argue that it is not. Instead, I argue, our inability to believe the error theory undermines many objections that (...)
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  27.  16
    Depressive thoughts limit working memory capacity in dysphoria.Nicholas A. Hubbard, Joanna L. Hutchison, Monroe Turner, Janelle Montroy, Ryan P. Bowles & Bart Rypma - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (2):193-209.
  28.  6
    The Social Study of Corporate Science: A Research Manifesto.Annemiek Nelis, John M. A. Verbakel & Bart Penders - 2009 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 29 (6):439-446.
    Laboratory ethnographies have provided valuable insights in the workings of contemporary science and technology and about facts in the making. Nearly all these ethnographic studies have been conducted at nonprofit research institutes. In this article, the authors argue that it is time for science and technology studies (STS) ethnography to direct its gaze toward for-profit knowledge production sites. The authors do so, based on a long-standing recognition that nonprofit academic laboratories do not have a monopoly on knowledge construction. First, they (...)
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  29.  59
    A pragma-dialectical response to objectivist epistemic challenges.Bart Garssen & Jan Albert van Laar - 2010 - Informal Logic 30 (2):122-141.
    The epistemologists Biro and Siegel have raised two objections against the pragma-dialectical approach to argumentation. According to the first objection the pragma-dialectical theory is not genuinely normative. According to the second objection the rejection of justificationism by pragma-dialecticians is unwarranted: they reject justificationism prematurely and they are not consistent in accepting some arguments (‘justifications’) as sound. The first objection is based on what we regard as the misconception that the goal of resolving differences of opinion cannot provide a normative approach. (...)
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  30. Nudging and Autonomy: Analyzing and Alleviating the Worries.Bart Engelen & Thomas Nys - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 11 (1):137-156.
    One of the most pervasive criticisms of nudges has been the claim that they violate, undermine or decrease people’s autonomy. This claim, however, is seldom backed up by an explicit and detailed conception of autonomy. In this paper, we aim to do three things. First, we want to clear up some conceptual confusion by distinguishing the different conceptions used by Cass Sunstein and his critics in order to get clear on how they conceive of autonomy. Second, we want to add (...)
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  31.  31
    Tolerance: A Virtue?Bart Engelen & Thomas Nys - 2008 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 15 (1):44-54.
    This article focuses on the difficult issue of what exactly goes on when an individual tolerates something. It focuses on the problem of why an individual would ever choose to allow for some practice that he deerns unacceptable while having the power to do something about it. After distinguishing between different attitudes (tolerant as well as intolerant), this article argues that individuals can have various reasons for deciding to tolerate what they deern wrong. As such, we defend a broad conception (...)
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  32.  11
    Attitudes of Older Adults in a Group-Based Exercise Program Toward a Blended Intervention; A Focus-Group Study.Mehra Sumit, Dadema Tessa, J. A. Kröse Ben, Visser Bart, H. H. Engelbert Raoul, Van Den Helder Jantine & J. M. Weijs Peter - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  33.  13
    When is identity congruent with the self? A self-determination theory perspective.Bart Soenens & Maarten Vansteenkiste - 2011 - In Seth J. Schwartz, Koen Luyckx & Vivian L. Vignoles (eds.), Handbook of identity theory and research. New York: Springer Science+Business Media. pp. 381--402.
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  34. Reasons and Impossibility.Bart Streumer - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 136 (3):351-384.
    Many philosophers claim that it cannot be the case that a person ought to perform an action if this person cannot perform this action. However, most of these philosophers do not give arguments for the truth of this claim. In this paper, I argue that it is plausible to interpret this claim in such a way that it is entailed by the claim that there cannot be a reason for a person to perform an action if it is impossible that (...)
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  35.  76
    Signaling strength? An analysis of decision making in The Weakest Link.Marco A. Haan, Bart Los & Yohanes E. Riyanto - 2011 - Theory and Decision 71 (4):519-537.
    We analyze contestants’ behavior in the game show “The Weakest Link”. We focus on banking decisions, where a contestant chooses to secure an amount of money for the eventual winner, or to risk it on a general knowledge question. We find that contestants do not use the banking strategy that maximizes total expected prize money. Average earnings could be at least 17% higher. Our results suggest that contestants are not overconfident, but do try to convince other contestants that their ability (...)
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  36. Evidential Reasoning.Marcello Di Bello & Bart Verheij - 2011 - In G. Bongiovanni, Don Postema, A. Rotolo, G. Sartor, C. Valentini & D. Walton (eds.), Handbook in Legal Reasoning and Argumentation. Dordrecht, Netherland: Springer. pp. 447-493.
    The primary aim of this chapter is to explain the nature of evidential reasoning, the characteristic difficulties encountered, and the tools to address these difficulties. Our focus is on evidential reasoning in criminal cases. There is an extensive scholarly literature on these topics, and it is a secondary aim of the chapter to provide readers the means to find their way in historical and ongoing debates.
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  37. Introduction: a new perspective on privacy.Bart Sloot, Luciano Floridi & Linnet Taylor - 2016 - In Bart van der Sloot, Luciano Floridi & Linnet Taylor (eds.), Group privacy. Springer Verlag.
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  38.  12
    Long-term effects of covert face recognition.Rob Jenkins, A. Mike Burton, Andrew W. Ellis, Bart Geurts, Anna Papafragou & Julien Musolino - 2002 - Cognition 86 (2):B43-B52.
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  39.  25
    The Action Game: A computational model for learning repertoires of goals and vocabularies to express them in a population of agents.Bart Jansen & Jan Cornelis - 2012 - Interaction Studies 13 (2):285-313.
    This article introduces a computational model which illustrates how a population of agents can coordinate a vocabulary for goal oriented behavior through repeated local interactions, called “Action Games”. Using principles of self organization and specific assumptions on their behavior, the agents learn the goals and a vocabulary for them. It is shown that the proposed model can be used to investigate the coordination of vocabularies for goal oriented behavior both in a vertical and in a horizontal transmission scheme. Furthermore, it (...)
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  40.  17
    The Action Game: A computational model for learning repertoires of goals and vocabularies to express them in a population of agents.Bart Jansen & Jan Cornelis - 2012 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 13 (2):285-313.
    This article introduces a computational model which illustrates how a population of agents can coordinate a vocabulary for goal oriented behavior through repeated local interactions, called “Action Games”. Using principles of self organization and specific assumptions on their behavior, the agents learn the goals and a vocabulary for them. It is shown that the proposed model can be used to investigate the coordination of vocabularies for goal oriented behavior both in a vertical and in a horizontal transmission scheme. Furthermore, it (...)
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  41.  68
    Making Sense of Self Talk.Bart Geurts - 2018 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 9 (2):271-285.
    People talk not only to others but also to themselves. The self talk we engage in may be overt or covert, and is associated with a variety of higher mental functions, including reasoning, problem solving, planning and plan execution, attention, and motivation. When talking to herself, a speaker takes devices from her mother tongue, originally designed for interpersonal communication, and employs them to communicate with herself. But what could it even mean to communicate with oneself? To answer that question, we (...)
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  42.  75
    Pragmatics and Processing.Bart Geurts & Paula Rubio-Fernández - 2015 - Ratio 28 (4):446-469.
    Gricean pragmatics has often been criticised for being implausible from a psychological point of view. This line of criticism is never backed up by empirical evidence, but more importantly, it ignores the fact that Grice never meant to advance a processing theory, in the first place. Taking our lead from Marr, we distinguish between two levels of explanation: at the W-level, we are concerned with what agents do and why; at the H-level, we ask how agents do whatever it is (...)
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  43.  38
    On Inertia: Resistance to Change in Individuals, Institutions and the Development of Knowledge.Bart Zantvoort - 2015 - Cosmos and History 11 (1):342-361.
    The term ‘inertia’ is often used to describe a kind of irrational resistance to change in individuals or institutions. Institutions, ideas and power structures appear to become entrenched over time, and may become ineffective or obsolete, even if they once played a legitimate or useful role. In this paper I argue that there is a common set of problems underlying the occurrence of resistance to change in individuals, social structures and the development of knowledge. Resistance to change is not always (...)
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  44.  18
    Religiosity, moral attitudes and moral competence.Bart Duriez - 2003 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 25 (1):210-221.
    The present research investigates the relation between the religiosity dimensions which Wulff described and both moral attitudes and moral competence. The Post-Critical Belief scale was used as a measure of Wulff's religiosity dimensions, and the Moral Judgment Test was used to measure both moral attitudes and moral competence. Results from an adolescent sample , a student sample and a sample of adults affiliated to the Roman Catholic Church suggest, that, whereas the Literal vs. Symbolic dimension shows substantial relations with moral (...)
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  45.  36
    Credibility Engineering in the Food Industry: Linking Science, Regulation, and Marketing in a Corporate Context.Bart Penders & Annemiek P. Nelis - 2011 - Science in Context 24 (4):487-515.
    ArgumentWe expand upon the notion of the “credibility cycle” through a study of credibility engineering by the food industry. Research and development (R&D) as well as marketing contribute to the credibility of the food company Unilever and its claims. Innovation encompasses the development, marketing, and sales of products. These are directed towards three distinct audiences: scientific peers, regulators, and consumers. R&D uses scientific articles to create credit for itself amongst peers and regulators. These articles are used to support health claims (...)
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  46.  38
    An empirical examination of the content and composition of board Charters.Chris Bart - 2006 - International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 2 (s 3-4):198-216.
    This article presents the findings from an exploratory empirical research investigation that assessed the content of selected Board Charters for 118 publicly traded companies listed on the TSX/S&P Composite Index. The Board Charter is considered to be the starting point in a Board's quest for creating a state of good governance within its organisation. However, the specific content of what a Board Charter actually contains has largely remained a mystery. The current study, therefore, was designed to identify what a typical (...)
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  47. Convention and common ground.Bart Geurts - 2018 - Mind and Language 33 (2):115-129.
    Conventions are regularities in social behaviour of the past that enable us to coordinate our actions. Some conventions are lawlike: they are expected to be observed always or nearly always. However, in order to coordinate our actions, it may suffice that a precedent has occurred often enough, and sometimes even a single precedent will do. So, in general, conventions merely enable us to solve our coordination problems; lawlike conventions are a special case. Grammatical conventions are often lawlike; sense conventions are (...)
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  48.  19
    Rationality, Norms and Institutions: In Search of a Realistic Utopia.Bart Engelen - 2007 - Human Affairs 17 (1):33-41.
    Rationality, Norms and Institutions: In Search of a Realistic Utopia The main goal of political philosophers is to search for a realistic utopia by taking individuals as they are and institutions, rules and laws as they might be. Instead of trying to change either individuals or institutions in order to improve society, this article argues that both strategies should be combined, since there are causal connections running both ways. Because individuals ultimately devise and uphold institutions, one should be optimistic about (...)
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  49. The Ethics of Sex Selection for Non-Medical Reasons: A Defence of Common Sense.Bart Engelen & Antoon Vandevelde - 2004 - Ethical Perspectives 11 (1):76-89.
    In the previous issue of Ethical Perspectives David Heyd defends the permissibility of sex selection for non-medical reasons. He tries to show that there is nothing inherently wrong with this practice and that allowing it does not lead to undesirable consequences. There are several difficulties with his analysis, but the main objection is that it ultimately relies on a crude form of utilitarianism. Along with some critical comments on his article, we provide ethical arguments in support of the intuitive condemnation (...)
     
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  50.  49
    Servant Leadership and Innovative Work Behavior in Chinese High-Tech Firms: A Moderated Mediation Model of Meaningful Work and Job Autonomy.Wenjing Cai, Evgenia I. Lysova, Svetlana N. Khapova & Bart A. G. Bossink - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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