Results for '*Reflectiveness'

41 found
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  1.  8
    Is Self-Reflectiveness an Unhealthy Aspect of Private Self-Consciousness?D. Scandell - 2001 - Journal of Psychology 135 (4):451-461.
  2.  17
    Further Contrasts Between Self-Reflectiveness and Internal State Awareness Factors of Private Self-Consciousness.P. J. Watson, R. J. Morris & A. Hickman Ramsey - 1996 - Journal of Psychology 130:183-92.
  3. Heraclitus' Rebuke of Polymathy: A Core Element in the Reflectiveness of His Thought.Keith Begley - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 23 (1):21–50.
    I offer an examination of a core element in the reflectiveness of Heraclitus’ thought, namely, his rebuke of polymathy . In doing so, I provide a response to a recent claim that Heraclitus should not be considered to be a philosopher, by attending to his paradigmatically philosophical traits. Regarding Heraclitus’ attitude to that naïve form of ‘wisdom’, i.e., polymathy, I argue that he does not advise avoiding experience of many things, rather, he advises rejecting experience of things as merely many (...)
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  4.  7
    Critical Reflections on Reflectiveness, Intellectual Responsibility, Critical Theory, Experience and the Moral Governance of Schools.James Walker - 1999 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 31 (1):7–8.
  5.  43
    The Confirmation of Critical Theory: The Role of Reflectiveness. [REVIEW]Kai Nielsen - 1993 - Human Studies 16 (4):381 - 397.
  6.  22
    Heuristics and Biases: Interactions Among Numeracy, Ability, and Reflectiveness Predict Normative Responding.Paul A. Klaczynski - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  7.  73
    Socratic Questionnaires.Nat Hansen, Kathryn B. Francis & Hamish Greening - 2022 - Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy.
    When experimental participants are given the chance to reflect and revise their initial judgments in a dynamic conversational context, do their responses to philosophical scenarios differ from responses to those same scenarios presented in a traditional static survey? In three experiments comparing responses given in conversational contexts with responses to traditional static surveys, we find no consistent evidence that responses differ in these different formats. This aligns with recent findings that various manipulations of reflectiveness have no effect on participants’ judgments (...)
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  8.  33
    Between Public and Private Life: Traditional Ethics in Modern Society. [REVIEW]Hui Yan - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):385-399.
    In terms of life space, individuals are usually settled in different spaces according to relationships of blood, geography, and profession. In pre-modern societies, ethics were realized through customs, conventions, taboos, magical practices, and politics. Because this was not an open process in which rationality was sufficiently employed, non-reflectiveness and non-criticality were its essence, and intuitions and feelings were its basic modes of existence. In modern societies, the logic of capital movement settles groups of people according to their economic dependence, and (...)
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  9.  22
    The Mind is Willing, but the Situation Constrains: Why and When Leader Conscientiousness Relates to Ethical Leadership.Mayowa T. Babalola, Michelle C. Bligh, Babatunde Ogunfowora, Liang Guo & Omale A. Garba - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (1):75-89.
    While previous research has established that employees who have a more conscientious leader are more likely to perceive that their leader is ethical, the underlying mechanisms and boundary conditions of this linkage remain unknown. In order to better understand the relationship between leader conscientiousness and ethical leadership, we examine the potential mediating role of leader moral reflectiveness, as well as the potential moderating role of decision-making autonomy. Drawing from social cognitive theory, results from two samples of workgroup leaders and their (...)
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  10.  60
    Autonomy Beyond Voluntarism: In Defense of Hierarchy.Stefaan E. Cuypers - 2000 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):225-256.
    We haveconflictingpre-philosophical intuitions about what it means ‘to be true to ourselves.’ On the one hand, autonomy and authenticity seem closely connected to the lucidity of reflectiveness; on the other, they seem tightly interwoven with the immediacy of unreflectiveness. As opposed to a ‘Platonic’ intuition about the inferiority of the unexamined life, we have an equally strong ‘Nietzschean’ intuition about the corrosiveness of the examined life. Broadly speaking, the first intuition is more akin to the tradition of the Enlightenment, and (...)
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  11.  22
    Autonomy Beyond Voluntarism: In Defense of Hierarchy.Stefaan E. Cuypers - 2000 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):225-256.
    We have conflicting pre-philosophical intuitions about what it means ‘to be true to ourselves.’ On the one hand, autonomy and authenticity seem closely connected to the lucidity of reflectiveness; on the other, they seem tightly interwoven with the immediacy of unreflectiveness. As opposed to a ‘Platonic’ intuition about the inferiority of the unexamined life, we have an equally strong ‘Nietzschean’ intuition about the corrosiveness of the examined life. Broadly speaking, the first intuition is more akin to the tradition of the (...)
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  12. Confucius.Stephen C. Angle - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollete (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics. John Wiley & Sons.
    Confucius (551–479 BCE) is the Latinized name of Kong Qiu, best known in Chinese as Kongzi (Master Kong). Only partially successful in his public career, Confucius' private teaching inaugurated an era of reflectiveness and helped to define core elements of Chinese civilization. Subsequent generations of students built on his initial formulations to develop one of the world's great philosophical traditions, which in English we call “Confucianism”; various terms are used in Chinese, including Ru jia (the Scholars' School) and Dao xue (...)
     
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  13.  21
    Punishment, Participatory Democracy, and the Jury.Albert W. Dzur - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    Focusing democratic theory on the pressing issue of punishment, Punishment, Participatory Democracy, and the Jury argues for participatory institutional designs as antidotes to the American penal state. Citizen action in institutions like the jury and restorative justice programs can foster the attunement, reflectiveness, and full-bodied communication needed as foundations for widespread civic responsibility for criminal justice.
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  14.  25
    Rethinking and Extrapolating of Notion “Mental Experiment” Relating to Musical Art.V. Kulbizhekov - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 1:153-160.
    In this article the author examines the problem of mental experiment extrapolation to musical art. Thus an attempt was made to determine the community of mechanisms of thought process in the scientific cognition and in the artistic creation. Author talks about peculiarities of music mental experiment and emphasizes its basic functions in musical thought. Therefore, the mental experiment in the sphere of aesthetic activity has its own specific character, whichis not identical with the notion of the mental experiment in the (...)
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  15.  27
    Debates Y problemas en la antropología post-geertziana norteamiricana.Elías José Palti - 1997 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 14:111-122.
    The crisis of the belief -nowadays considered native- in the possibility of getting rid of our own concepts, or prejudces, and gaining a more of less immediate access to, achieving a more or less transparent insight in, those cultures alien to us pushed anthropologists ot begin to explore in the very conditions of possibility of the anthropological discuorse itself. Thus, the same series of transformations that undermined many evident, opened also new horizons of enquire paving the way to a process (...)
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  16. Consciousness During Dreams.PierCarla Cicogna & Marino Bosinelli - 2001 - Consciousness and Cognition 10 (1):26-41.
    Two aspects of consciousness are first considered: consciousness as awareness (phenomenological meaning) and consciousness as strategic control (functional meaning). As to awareness, three types can be distinguished: first, awareness as the phenomenal experiences of objects and events; second, awareness as meta-awareness, i.e., the awareness of mental life itself; third, awareness as self-awareness, i.e., the awareness of being oneself. While phenomenal experience and self-awareness are usually present during dreaming (even if many modifications are possible), meta-awareness is usually absent (apart from some (...)
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  17.  8
    ‘Fine, Invisible Threads’: Schopenhauer on the Cognitively Mediated Structure of Motivation.Sean T. Murphy - 2022 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 4 (1):1-22.
    The central claim of Schopenhauer’s account of human motivation is that ‘cognition is the medium of motives’. In light of motivation’s cognitively mediated structure, he contends that human beings are caused to act by ‘mere thoughts’, what he refers to metaphorically as ‘fine, invisible threads’. Despite this avowedly intellectualist handling of the subject, some commentators remain convinced that Schopenhauer is best read as accepting the ‘Humean truism’ that reason alone never motivates; rather, motivation always has its source in desire together (...)
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  18. Reflection and Reasoning in Moral Judgment.Joshua D. Greene - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (1):163-177.
    While there is much evidence for the influence of automatic emotional responses on moral judgment, the roles of reflection and reasoning remain uncertain. In Experiment 1, we induced subjects to be more reflective by completing the Cognitive Reflection Test prior to responding to moral dilemmas. This manipulation increased utilitarian responding, as individuals who reflected more on the CRT made more utilitarian judgments. A follow-up study suggested that trait reflectiveness is also associated with increased utilitarian judgment. In Experiment 2, subjects considered (...)
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  19.  18
    Reflection, Planning, and Temporally Extended Agency.Michael E. Bratman - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (1):35.
    We are purposive agents; but we—adult humans in a broadly modern world—are more than that. We are reflective about our motivation. We form prior plans and policies that organize our activity over time. And we see ourselves as agents who persist over time and who begin, develop, and then complete temporally extended activities and projects. Any reasonably complete theory of human action will need in some way to advert to this trio of features—to our reflectiveness, our planfulness, and our conception (...)
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  20. Reflection, Planning, and Temporally Extended Agency.Michael E. Bratman - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (1):35-61.
    We are purposive agents; but we—adult humans in a broadly modern world—are more than that. We are reflective about our motivation. We form prior plans and policies that organize our activity over time. And we see ourselves as agents who persist over time and who begin, develop, and then complete temporally extended activities and projects. Any reasonably complete theory of human action will need in some way to advert to this trio of features—to our reflectiveness, our planfulness, and our conception (...)
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  21. Tradition Vs. Traditionalism: Contemporary Perspectives in Jewish Thought.Avi Sagi (ed.) - 2008 - Rodopi.
    This book is a first attempt to examine the thought of key contemporary Jewish thinkers on the meaning of tradition in the context of two models. The classic model assumes that tradition reflects lack of dynamism and reflectiveness, and the present’s unqualified submission to the past. This view, however, is an image that the modernist ethos has ascribed to the tradition so as to remove it from modern existence. In the alternative model, a living tradition emerges as open and dynamic, (...)
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  22.  74
    Performatives and Antiperformatives.Ingvar Johansson - 2003 - Linguistics and Philosophy 26 (6):661-702.
    The paper highlights a certain kind of self-falsifying utterance, which I shall call antiperformative assertions, not noted in speech-act theory thus far. By taking such assertions into account, the old question whether explicit performatives have a truth-value can be resolved. I shall show that explicit performatives are in fact self-verifyingly true, but they are not related to propositions the way ordinary assertions are; antiperformatives have the same unusual relation to propositions, but are self-falsifyingly false. Explicit performatives are speech acts performed (...)
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  23. Beyond Evolution: Human Nature and the Limits of Evolutionary Explanation.Anthony O'Hear - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    In this controversial new book O'Hear takes a stand against the fashion for explaining human behavior in terms of evolution. He contends that while the theory of evolution is successful in explaining the development of the natural world in general, it is of limited value when applied to the human world. Because of our reflectiveness and our rationality we take on goals and ideals which cannot be justified in terms of survival-promotion or reproductive advantage. O'Hear examines the nature of human (...)
  24.  87
    Wholeness as the Body of Paradox.Steven M. Rosen - 1997 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 18 (4):391-423.
    This essay is written at the crossroads of intuitive holism, as typified in Eastern thought, and the discursive reflectiveness more characteristic of the West. The point of departure is the age-old human need to overcome fragmentation and realize wholeness. Three basic tasks are set forth: to provide some new insight into the underlying obstacle to wholeness, to show what would be necessary for surmounting this blockage, and to take a concrete step in that direction. At the outset, the question of (...)
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  25.  27
    An Idea Is Not Something Mute Like a Picture on a Pad.Lenn E. Goodman - 2009 - Review of Metaphysics 62 (3):591-631.
    Boldly describing the mind as the idea of the body – and the body as the most immediate object of our thinking – opens the way to a solution of the mind-body problem that Descartes bequeathed to philosophers discontented with substantial forms: Thought and extension, being of different natures, cannot explain one another. But if the mind intends the body, the congruence of mental and physical events makes sense. The order and connection of ideas parallels the order and connection of (...)
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  26.  1
    Landscapes of Learning.Maxine Greene - 1978 - Teachers College Press.
    Special 2018 Edition From the new Introduction by Janet L. Miller, Teachers College, Columbia University: "Maxine Greene never claimed to be a visionary thinker. But forty years later, her trepidations detailed throughout 1978's Landscapes of Learning now appear unnervingly prescient. Witness and treasure Landscapes as evidence of her matchless abilities to inspire myriad educators and students worldwide." “I would suggest that there must always be a place in teacher education for ‘foundations’ people, whose fundamental concern is with opening new perspectives (...)
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  27. Caring and Internality.Agnieszka Jaworska - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (3):529-568.
    In his work on internality, identification, and caring, Harry Frankfurt attempts to delineate the organization of agency peculiar to human beings, while avoiding the traditional overintellectualized emphasis on the human capacity to reason about action. The focal point of Frankfurt’s alternative picture is our capacity to make our own motivation the object of reflection. Building upon the observation that marginal agents (such as young children and Alzheimer’s patients) are capable of caring, I show that neither caring nor internality need to (...)
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  28.  14
    Reflection, Planning, and Temporally Extended Agency.Michael E. Bratman - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (1):35-61.
    We are purposive agents; but we—adult humans in a broadly modern world—are more than that. We are reflective about our motivation. We form prior plans and policies that organize our activity over time. And we see ourselves as agents who persist over time and who begin, develop, and then complete temporally extended activities and projects. Any reasonably complete theory of human action will need in some way to advert to this trio of features—to our reflectiveness, our planfulness, and our conception (...)
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  29.  1
    Development of Metacognition in Adolescence: The Congruency-Based Metacognition Scale.Kelssy Hitomi dos Santos Kawata, Yuki Ueno, Ryuichiro Hashimoto, Shinya Yoshino, Kazusa Ohta, Atsushi Nishida, Shuntaro Ando, Hironori Nakatani, Kiyoto Kasai & Shinsuke Koike - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    IntroductionPrevious studies on metacognitive ability were explored using self-report questionnaires that are difficult to adequately measure and evaluate when the capacity for self-reference is undeveloped. This study aimed to validate the Congruency-based Metacognition Scale to measure metacognition and the feeling of confidence abilities and to investigate the development of metacognition during adolescence.MethodsThe CMS was administered to 633 child–parent pairs in Japan. The CMS metacognition score was assessed based on congruency scores between the self-report of the child from a third-person perspective (...)
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  30.  34
    Antitheory and Edification: Williams and Kierkegaard on Some Possibilities for Philosophy.Mark A. Tietjen - 2012 - International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (4):471-486.
    This paper shows the remarkable compatibility of the thought of Bernard Williams and Søren Kierkegaard regarding what Williams would call the “limits” of philosophical ethics and practice. In different ways both Williams and Kierkegaard critique a reductionist conception of the ethical life, its obligations, and the prescriptions that ethical theories make based upon such conceptions. Additionally, the high level of reflectiveness in their respective societies worries both. For Williams the concern is an epistemological one, whereas for Kierkegaard the issue is (...)
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  31.  18
    Unburdening Suffering: Responses of Psychiatrists To Patients' Suicide Deaths.Anne-Grethe Talseth & Fredricka Gilje - 2007 - Nursing Ethics 14 (5):620-636.
    The research questions was: 'How do psychiatrists describe their responses to patients' suicidal deaths in the light of a published model of consolation?' The textual data (n = 5) was a subset of a larger (n = 19) study. Thematic analysis showed a main theme, 'unburdening grief', and six themes. Embedded in the results is a story about suffering that reveals that, through ethical reflectiveness, a meaning of suffering can be recreated that unburdens grief and opens up new understandings with (...)
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  32.  3
    Tuning in on the Becoming of Music.Edvin Østergaard - 2021 - Open Philosophy 4 (1):198-210.
    In this article, I explore the music-in-becoming as a dialogue. The thesis of my inquiry is that during musical composition, the composer’s listening is marked by both activeness and receptiveness; actively structuring the sounding work, and receptively letting the work express itself as it takes its form. Composer and work merge in sudden moments of attunement, the sensation of coherence between the so-fare completed and the anticipation of the as-of-yet unformed work. Composition is all about balancing writing as a handicraft (...)
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  33.  31
    The Roles We Make Others Take: Thoughts on the Ethics of Arguing.Katharina Stevens - 2019 - Topoi 38 (4):693-709.
    Feminist argumentation theorists have criticized the Dominant Adversarial Model in argumentation, according to which arguers should take proponent and opponent roles and argue against one another. The model is deficient because it creates disadvantages for feminine gendered persons in a way that causes significant epistemic and practical harms. In this paper, I argue that the problem that these critics have pointed out can be generalized: whenever an arguer is given a role in the argument the associated tasks and norms of (...)
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  34. The Local Versus the Global in the History of Relativity: The Case of Belgium.Sjang L. ten Hagen - 2020 - Science in Context 33 (3):227-250.
    ArgumentThis article contributes to a global history of relativity, by exploring how Einstein’s theory was appropriated in Belgium. This may sound like a contradiction in terms, yet the early-twentieth-century Belgian context, because of its cultural diversity and reflectiveness of global conditions, proves well-suited to expose transnational flows and patterns in the global history of relativity. The attempts of Belgian physicist Théophile de Donder to contribute to relativity physics during the 1910s and 1920s illustrate the role of the war in shaping (...)
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  35. The Basic Cycle.Natalie Depraz, Francisco Varela & Pierre Vermersch - 2003 - In Natalie Depraz, Francisco J. Varela & Pierre Vermersch (eds.), On Becoming Aware: A Pragmatics of Experiencing. John Benjamins. pp. 15-63.
  36. The Point of View of the Researcher.F. J. Varela & Pierre Vermersch - 2003 - In Natalie Depraz, Francisco J. Varela & Pierre Vermersch (eds.), On Becoming Aware: A Pragmatics of Experiencing. John Benjamins. pp. 115-154.
  37.  65
    Two Uses of Michel Foucault in Political Theory: Concepts and Methods in Giorgio Agamben and Ian Hacking.Colin Koopman - 2015 - Constellations 22 (4):571-585.
    This deep presence of Foucault’s influence across contemporary theoretical landscapes signals a need for self-reflectiveness that has largely (though not entirely) been missing in contemporary uses of Foucault. While scholarship in a Foucauldian vein is obviously alive and well, scholarship on Foucauldian methodology is not. This paper develops a distinction between two methodological features of Foucault’s work that deserve to be disentangled: I parse the methods (e.g., genealogy, archaeology) and concepts (e.g., discipline, biopower) featured in Foucault’s texts. Following this, I (...)
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  38.  1
    Self-Directedness and the Question of Autonomy: From Counterfeit Education to Critical and Transformative Adult Learning.Wojciech Kruszelnicki - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 39 (2):187-203.
    The aim of this paper is to introduce a correction into the notion of self-directed adult learning by way of conjoining it with philosophically elaborated notions of autonomy, self-reflectiveness, and maturity. The basic premise of this intervention is that in andragogical theorizing, learners’ self-directedness ought not to be thought as obvious and thus beyond question. Since adult selves are not transparent but socially, culturally, and discoursively constructed, adult educators are encouraged to think of themselves as facilitators of adult learners’ self-awareness (...)
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  39.  3
    Self-Directedness and the Question of Autonomy: From Counterfeit Education to Critical and Transformative Adult Learning.Wojciech Kruszelnicki - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 39 (2):187-203.
    The aim of this paper is to introduce a correction into the notion of self-directed adult learning by way of conjoining it with philosophically elaborated notions of autonomy, self-reflectiveness, and maturity. The basic premise of this intervention is that in andragogical theorizing, learners’ self-directedness ought not to be thought as obvious and thus beyond question. Since adult selves are not transparent but socially, culturally, and discoursively constructed, adult educators are encouraged to think of themselves as facilitators of adult learners’ self-awareness (...)
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  40.  9
    Self-Directedness and the Question of Autonomy: From Counterfeit Education to Critical and Transformative Adult Learning.Wojciech Kruszelnicki - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 39 (2):187-203.
    The aim of this paper is to introduce a correction into the notion of self-directed adult learning by way of conjoining it with philosophically elaborated notions of autonomy, self-reflectiveness, and maturity. The basic premise of this intervention is that in andragogical theorizing, learners’ self-directedness ought not to be thought as obvious and thus beyond question. Since adult selves are not transparent but socially, culturally, and discoursively constructed, adult educators are encouraged to think of themselves as facilitators of adult learners’ self-awareness (...)
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  41.  2
    Self-Directedness and the Question of Autonomy: From Counterfeit Education to Critical and Transformative Adult Learning.Wojciech Kruszelnicki - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 39 (2):187-203.
    The aim of this paper is to introduce a correction into the notion of self-directed adult learning by way of conjoining it with philosophically elaborated notions of autonomy, self-reflectiveness, and maturity. The basic premise of this intervention is that in andragogical theorizing, learners’ self-directedness ought not to be thought as obvious and thus beyond question. Since adult selves are not transparent but socially, culturally, and discoursively constructed, adult educators are encouraged to think of themselves as facilitators of adult learners’ self-awareness (...)
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