Results for ' wildlife conservation'

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  1.  28
    Wildlife Conservation, Food Production and 'Development': Can They be Integrated? Ecological Agriculture and Elephant Conservation in Africa.Marthe Kiley-Worthington - 1997 - Environmental Values 6 (4):455-470.
    It is widely believed that there must be a conflict between food production and conservation, and that development must be related to economics. Both these beliefs are questioned. It is suggested that ecological agriculture, which includes ethologically and ecologically sound animal management can reduce conflicts between conservation and food production. African elephants are taken as an example illustrating different attitudes to conservation. It is proposed that, rather than developing further the present common conservation attitude of ' (...)
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  2.  36
    Integrating AI ethics in wildlife conservation AI systems in South Africa: a review, challenges, and future research agenda.Irene Nandutu, Marcellin Atemkeng & Patrice Okouma - 2023 - AI and Society 38 (1):245-257.
    With the increased use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in wildlife conservation, issues around whether AI-based monitoring tools in wildlife conservation comply with standards regarding AI Ethics are on the rise. This review aims to summarise current debates and identify gaps as well as suggest future research by investigating (1) current AI Ethics and AI Ethics issues in wildlife conservation, (2) Initiatives Stakeholders in AI for wildlife conservation should consider integrating AI Ethics in (...)
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  3.  1
    Wildlife conservation in churchyards: A case-study in ethical judgements.N. S. Cooper - 1995 - Biodiversity and Conservation 4 (8):916-928.
    Biodiversity and Conservation 4: 916-928.
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  4.  6
    The Fallacy of Wildlife Conservation.John A. Livingston - 1981 - Mcclelland & Stewart.
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  5.  26
    Ethics on the Ark: Zoos, Animal Welfare, and Wildlife Conservation.Bryan G. Norton, Michael Hutchins, Terry Maple & Elizabeth Stevens - 2012 - Smithsonian Institution.
    Ethics on the Ark presents a passionate, multivocal discussion—among zoo professionals, activists, conservation biologists, and philosophers—about the future of zoos and aquariums, the treatment of animals in captivity, and the question of whether the individual, the species, or the ecosystem is the most important focus in conservation efforts. Contributors represent all sides of the issues. Moving from the fundamental to the practical, from biodiversity to population regulation, from animal research to captive breeding, Ethics on the Ark represents an (...)
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  6.  26
    A Political-Ecology Approach to Wildlife Conservation in Kenya.John S. Akama, Christopher L. Lant & G. Wesley Burnett - 1996 - Environmental Values 5 (4):335-347.
    Kenya has one of the highest remaining concentrations of tropical savanna wildlife in the world. It has been recognised by the state and international community as a 'unique world heritage' which should be preserved for posterity. However, the wildlife conservation efforts of the Kenya government confront complex and often persistent social and ecological problems, including land-use conflicts between the local people and wildlife, local people's suspicions and hostilities toward state policies of wildlife conservation, and (...)
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  7.  40
    The fallacy of wildlife conservation.Iii Holmes Rolston - 1985 - Environmental Ethics 7 (2):177-180.
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  8.  16
    COVID-19, other zoonotic diseases and wildlife conservation.Carlos Santana - 2020 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 42 (4):1-3.
    Many experts have warned that environmental degradation is increasing the likelihood of future pandemics like COVID-19, as habitat loss and poaching increase close contact between wildlife and people. This fact has been framed as a reason to increase wildlife conservation efforts. We have many good reasons to step up conservation efforts, but arguments for doing so on the basis of pandemic prevention are rhetorically, ethically, and empricially flawed.
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  9. The Value of Being Wild: A Phenomenological Approach to Wildlife Conservation.Adam Cruise - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Stellenbosch
    Given that one-million species are currently threatened with extinction and that humans are undermining the entire natural infrastructure on which our modern world depends (IPBES, 2019), this dissertation will show that there is a need to provide an alternative approach to wildlife conservation, one that avoids anthropocentrism and wildlife valuation on an instrumental basis to provide meaningful and tangible success for both wildlife conservation and human well-being in an inclusive way. In this sense, The Value (...)
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  10.  2
    On the fundamental incompatibility between wildlife conservation and animal ethics.Carla Turner - 2023 - South African Journal of Philosophy 42 (4):261-269.
    Wildlife conservation aims to protect the natural world, plant and animal species, and the habitats they form part of and rely on for survival. More particularly, it focuses on species that are considered important, be it from economic, ecological and other perspectives, and preventing harm to these species. While conservation activities, based on common conservation values such as species fitness and biodiversity, are no doubt beneficial to animals in general, there seems to be a fundamental disjoint (...)
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  11.  47
    Just conservation: The question of justice in global wildlife conservation.Kok-Chor Tan - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (2):e12720.
    While there is a significant amount of discussion in philosophy on the ethics of wildlife conservation, there is relatively less discussion on the justice of conservation. By the “justice of conservation”, I mean the question of what we owe to fellow human beings with respect to conservation goals and practices. The goal of this paper is two-fold: first to highlight the justice-gap in the morality of wildlife conservation and, second, to frame and propose (...)
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  12. Climate Induced Migration: A Pragmatic Strategy for Wildlife Conservation on Farmland.Samantha Noll - 2017 - Pragmatism Today 2 (8):143-159.
    This paper turns to pragmatism for strategies to assist with the timely implementation of conservation efforts, as it provides tools to unfreeze policy decision making so that stakeholders, from farmers to wildlife organizations, can readily address impacts associated with climate induced non-human migration. The first section of this essay introduces readers to the topic of climate induced migration and provides an overview of how agriculture could either inhibit or help facilitate migrating species. The second section then applies Thompson’s (...)
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  13. The Fallacy of Wildlife Conservation[REVIEW]Iii Holmes Rolston - 1985 - Environmental Ethics 7 (2):177-180.
     
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  14.  8
    The Importance of Human Emotions for Wildlife Conservation.Nathalia M. Castillo-Huitrón, Eduardo J. Naranjo, Dídac Santos-Fita & Erin Estrada-Lugo - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Animals have always been important for human life due to the ecological, cultural and economic functions that they represent. This has allowed building several kinds of relationships that have promoted different emotions in human societies. The objective of this review was to identify the main emotions that humans show towards wildlife species and the impact of such emotions on animal populations’ management. We reviewed academic databases to identify previous studies on this topic worldwide. An analysis of the emotions on (...)
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  15.  40
    S. dabbert, A. dubgaard, L. slangen and M. Whitby (eds.), The economics of landscape and wildlife conservation.D. Peter Stonehouse - 1999 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 11 (3):247-249.
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  16.  18
    The Political Salience of Animal Protection in the Netherlands (2012–2021) and Belgium (2010–2019): What do Dutch and Belgian Political Parties Pledge on Animal Welfare and Wildlife Conservation[REVIEW]Steven P. McCulloch & Annick Hus - 2023 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 36 (1):1-23.
    The Netherlands and Belgium are European Union (EU) states with a shared border and cultural similarities. Article 13 of the EU Treaty of Lisbon recognises animals as sentient beings. EU laws protect animal welfare and conservation, and member states can implement more stringent legislation. Political salience refers to the extent to which citizens are concerned about political issues. Issue salience can be measured by assessing references to animal protection in party political manifestos. This research analyses the political salience of (...)
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  17.  15
    Wildlife Ethics: The Ethics of Wildlife Management and Conservation.Clare Palmer, Bob Fischer, Christian Gamborg, Jordan Hampton & Peter Sandoe - 2023 - Blackwell.
    Wildlife Ethics A systematic account of the ethical issues related to wildlife management and conservation Wildlife Ethics is the first systematic, book-length discussion of the ethics of wildlife conservation and management, and examines the key ethical questions and controversies. Tackling both theory and practice, the text is divided into two parts. The first describes key concepts, ethical theories, and management models relating to wildlife; the second puts these concepts, theories, and models to work, (...)
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  18.  41
    Conservation and Wildlife Management in South African National Parks 1930s–1960s.Jane Carruthers - 2008 - Journal of the History of Biology 41 (2):203 - 236.
    In recent decades conservation biology has achieved a high position among the sciences. This is certainly true of South Africa, a small country, but the third most biodiverse in the world. This article traces some aspects of the transformation of South African wildlife management during the 1930s to the 1960s from game reserves based on custodianship and the "balance of nature" into scientifically managed national parks with a philosophy of "command and control" or "management by intervention." In 1910 (...)
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  19.  33
    Conservation and Wildlife Management in South African National Parks 1930s–1960s.Jane Carruthers - 2008 - Journal of the History of Biology 41 (2):203-236.
    In recent decades conservation biology has achieved a high position among the sciences. This is certainly true of South Africa, a small country, but the third most biodiverse in the world. This article traces some aspects of the transformation of South African wildlife management during the 1930s to the 1960s from game reserves based on custodianship and the "balance of nature" into scientifically managed national parks with a philosophy of "command and control" or "management by intervention." In 1910 (...)
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  20.  10
    Approaches to Conserving Vulnerable Wildlife in China: Does the Colour of Cat Matter - if it Catches Mice?Richard B. Harris - 1996 - Environmental Values 5 (4):303-334.
    Global human population expansion is rooted in a remarkably successful evolutionary innovation. The neolithic transformation of the natural world gave rise to a symbiosis between humans and their domesticated plant and animal partners that will expand from a current 20 per cent to 60 percent of terrestrial biomass by the middle of the coming century. Such an increase must necessarily be accompanied by a concomitant decrease in wildlife biomass. We suggest that current trends in population growth are unlikely to (...)
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  21. A New Approach to Conservation: The Importance of the Individual through Wildlife Rehabilitation.[author unknown] - 2005 - Environmental Values 14 (4):527-529.
     
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  22.  33
    Conservation of biodiversity within Canadian agricultural landscapes: Integrating habitat for wildlife[REVIEW]Pierre Mineau & Alison McLaughlin - 1996 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 9 (2):93-113.
    Industrialized agriculture currently substitutes many of the ecological functions of soil micro-organisms, macroinvertebrates, wild plants, and vertebrate animals with high cost inputs of pesticides and fertilizers. Enhanced biological diversity potentially offers agricultural producers a means of reducing the cost of their production. Conservation of biodiversity in agricultural landscapes may be greatly enhanced by the adoption of certain crop management practices, such as reduced pesticide usage or measures to prevent soil erosion. Still, the vast monocultures comprising the crop area in (...)
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  23.  10
    Eating game: proteins, international conservation and the rebranding of African wildlife, 1955–1965.Raf de Bont - 2020 - British Journal for the History of Science 53 (2):183-205.
    Around 1960, leading figures in the international conservation circuit – such as Julian Huxley, Frank Fraser Darling and E. Barton Worthington – successfully propagated new visions about the value of undomesticated African mammals. Against traditional ideas, they presented these mammals as a highly efficient source of protein for growing African populations. In line with this vision, they challenged non-interventionist ideals of nature preservation, and launched proposals for active management through game ‘ranching’ and ‘cropping’. As such, they created a new (...)
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  24.  44
    Indicators of biodiversity and conservational wildlife quality on danish organic farms for use in farm management: A multidisciplinary approach to indicator development and testing. [REVIEW]Egon Noe, Niels Halberg & Jens Reddersen - 2005 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (4):383-414.
    Organic farming is expected to contribute to conserving national biodiversity on farms, especially remnant, old, and undisturbed small biotopes, forests, and permanent grassland. This objective cannot rely on the legislation of organic farming solely, and to succeed, farmers need to understand the goals behind it. A set of indicators with the purpose of facilitating dialogues between expert and farmer on wildlife quality has been developed and tested on eight organic farms. “Weed cover in cereal fields,” was used as an (...)
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  25.  25
    Genetics and genomics in wildlife studies: Implications for ecology, evolution, and conservation biology.Fernando Cruz, Adrian C. Brennan, Alejandro Gonzalez-Voyer, Violeta Muñoz-Fuentes, Muthukrishnan Eaaswarkhanth, Séverine Roques & F. Xavier Picó - 2012 - Bioessays 34 (3):245-246.
  26.  39
    Endorsement of Ethnomedicinal Knowledge Towards Conservation in the Context of Changing Socio-Economic and Cultural Values of Traditional Communities Around Binsar Wildlife Sanctuary in Uttarakhand, India.P. C. Phondani, R. K. Maikhuri & N. S. Bisht - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):573-600.
    The study of the interrelationship between ethnomedicinal knowledge and socio-cultural values needs to be studied mainly for the simple reason that culture is not only the ethical imperative for development, it is also the condition of its sustainability; for their exists a symbiotic relationship between habitats and cultures. The traditional communities around Binsar Wildlife Sanctuary of Uttarakhand state in India have a rich local health care tradition, which has been in practice for the past hundreds of years. The present (...)
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  27.  35
    Wildlife Ethics and Practice: Why We Need to Change the Way We Talk About ‘Invasive Species’.Meera Iona Inglis - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (2):299-313.
    This article calls for an end to the use of the term ‘invasive species’, both in the scientific and public discourse on wildlife conservation. There are two broad reasons for this: the first problem with the invasive species narrative is that this demonisation of ‘invasives’ is morally wrong, particularly because it usually results in the unjust killing of the animals in question. Following on from this, the second problem is that the narrative is also incoherent, both from scientific (...)
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  28.  18
    Jamie Lorimer, Wildlife in the Anthropocene: Conservation after Nature[REVIEW]Yogi Hendlin - 2016 - Environmental Values 25 (5):627-629.
  29.  13
    Wildlife Gardening and Connectedness to Nature: Engaging the Unengaged.Amy Shaw, Kelly Miller & Geoff Wescott - 2013 - Environmental Values 22 (4):483-502.
    An often overlooked impact of urbanisation is a reduction in our ability to connect with nature in our daily lives. If people lose the ability to connect with nature we run the risk of creating a n...
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  30.  13
    The Ecological Ethics Framework: Finding our Way in the Ethical Labyrinth of Nature Conservation: Commentary on “Using an ecological ethics framework to make decisions about relocating wildlife”.Jac Aa Swart - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):523-526.
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  31.  47
    Conservation in a Brave New World.Douglas Ian Campbell & Patrick Michael Whittle - 2017 - In Douglas Ian Campbell & Patrick Michael Whittle (eds.), Resurrecting Extinct Species: Ethics and Authenticity. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 1-28.
    This chapter introduces the two main philosophical questions that are raised by the prospect of extinct species being brought back from the dead—namely, the ‘Authenticity Question’ and the ‘Ethical Question’. It distinguishes different types of de-extinction, and different methods by which de-extinction can be accomplished. Finally, it examines the aims of wildlife conservation with a view to whether they are compatible with de-extinction, or not.
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  32.  10
    The ‘humanised zoo’: decolonizing conservation education through a new narrative.Spartaco Gippoliti & Corrado Battisti - 2023 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 23:1-5.
    Wildlife conservation seems unaffected by decolonization movements that recently led to removing or vandalizing several statues of geographers and colonizers worldwide. Instead, we observe an increased emphasis on total protection of species and habitats that, although strategic in a period of environmental crisis, may have grossly negative impacts on living standards of local indigenous communities. In this regard, we should decolonize society, and specifically conservation, by adding new metaphoric statues to the old ones, preferably of those living (...)
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  33.  6
    Wildlife Spectacles.Russell A. Mittermeier, Patricio Robles Gil, Cristina Goettsch Mittermeier, Thomas Brooks, Michael Hoffman, William R. Konstant, Gustavo A. B. Da Fonseca, Roderic Mast, Peter A. Seligmann & William G. Conway - 2003 - Conservation International.
    This lavishly illustrated book highlights the conservation importance of congregatory animals species--those which gather in vast groups. It also focuses on the irreplaceability of the congregation sites which are able to support such large gatherings of animals, fish, or birds.
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  34.  35
    Urban Greening and Human-Wildlife Relations in Philadelphia: From Animal Control to Multispecies Coexistence?Christian Hunold - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (1):67-87.
    City-scale urban greening is expanding wildlife habitat in previously less hospitable urban areas. Does this transformation also prompt a reckoning with the longstanding idea that cities are places intended to satisfy primarily human needs? I pose this question in the context of one of North America's most ambitious green infrastructure programmes to manage urban runoff: Philadelphia's Green City, Clean Waters. Given that the city's green infrastructure plans have little to say about wildlife, I investigate how wild animals fit (...)
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  35.  8
    Tina Loo. States of Nature: Conserving Canada’s Wildlife in the Twentieth Century. xxiv + 280 pp., illus., figs., app., bibl., index. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2006. $29.95. [REVIEW]Frederick R. Davis - 2007 - Isis 98 (2):428-428.
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  36.  9
    Dominion over Wildlife? An Environmental Theology of Human–Wildlife Relations by Stephen M. Vantassel.Coleman Fannin - 2013 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 33 (2):193-194.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Dominion over Wildlife? An Environmental Theology of Human–Wildlife Relations by Stephen M. VantasselColeman FanninDominion over Wildlife? An Environmental Theology of Human–Wildlife Relations Stephen M. Vantassel Eugene, OR: Resource, 2009. 232pp. $26.00In Dominion over Wildlife?, Stephen Vantassel, a scholar with professional experience in animal damage control, provides a substantive examination of the neglected subject of human–wildlife relations. For this, he is to be (...)
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  37.  44
    Illegal Hunting and Angling:The Neutralization of Wildlife Law Violations.Stephen Eliason - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (3):225-243.
    This study provides a descriptive account of rationalizations for poaching used by wildlife law violators. There has been little research on motivations for poaching. This study uses qualitative data obtained from surveys and in-depth interviews with wildlife law violators and conservation officers in Kentucky to examine rationalizations used by wildlife law violators to excuse and justify participation in this type of illegal activity. Comments from conservation officers and violators revealed widespread use of rationalizations, with denial (...)
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  38.  28
    Conservation and Individual Worth.Gill Aitken - 1997 - Environmental Values 6 (4):439-454.
    It is commonly supposed that individual animals are of little relevance to conservation which is concerned, instead, with groups of things or 'wholes' such as species, habitats, and the like. It is further contended by some that by prioritising individuals, two of those values that are held dear by conservation – namely natural selection and fitness – are compromised. Taking wildlife rehabilitation as a paradigm case of concern for the individual, it is argued that the latter claim (...)
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  39. Relationship-scale Conservation.Jeffrey Brooks, Jeffrey J. Brooks, Robert Dvorak, Mike Spindler & Susanne Miller - 2015 - Wildlife Society Bulletin 39 (1):147-158.
    Conservation can occur anywhere regardless of scale, political jurisdiction, or landownership. We present a framework to help managers at protected areas practice conservation at the scale of relationships. We focus on relationships between stakeholders and protected areas and between managers and other stakeholders. We provide a synthesis of key natural resources literature and present a case example to support our premise and recommendations. The purpose is 4-fold: 1) discuss challenges and threats to conservation and protected areas; 2) (...)
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  40.  18
    The Impacts of Conservation and Militarization on Indigenous Peoples.Robert K. Hitchcock - 2019 - Human Nature 30 (2):217-241.
    There has been a long-standing debate about the roles of San in the militaries of southern Africa and the prevalence of violence among the Ju/'hoansi and other San people. The evolutionary anthropology and social anthropological debates over the contexts in which violence and warfare occurs among hunters and gatherers are considered, as is the “tribal zone theory” of warfare between states and indigenous people. This paper assesses the issues that arise from these discussions, drawing on data from San in Angola, (...)
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  41.  40
    Using an ecological ethics framework to make decisions about the relocation of wildlife.Earl D. McCoy & Kristin Berry - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):505-521.
    Relocation is an increasingly prominent conservation tool for a variety of wildlife, but the technique also is controversial, even among conservation practitioners. An organized framework for addressing the moral dilemmas often accompanying conservation actions such as relocation has been lacking. Ecological ethics may provide such a framework and appears to be an important step forward in aiding ecological researchers and biodiversity managers to make difficult moral choices. A specific application of this framework can make the reasoning (...)
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  42.  26
    Conservation Floors and Degradation Ceilings.Alexander Lee, Alex Hamilton & Benjamin Hale - 2020 - Environmental Ethics 42 (2):135-148.
    U.S. conservation policy, both in structure and in practice, places a heavy burden on conservationists to halt development projects, rather than on advocates of development to defend their proposed actions. In this paper, we identify this structural phenomenon in several landmark environmental policies and in practice in the contemporary debate concerning oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The burdens placed on conservation can be understood in terms of constraints—as conservation ‘floors’ and degradation ‘ceilings’. At (...)
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  43.  10
    Improving conservation outcomes in agricultural landscapes: farmer perceptions of native vegetation on the Yorke Peninsula, South Australia.Bianca Amato & Sophie Petit - 2023 - Agriculture and Human Values 40 (4):1537-1557.
    With agriculture the primary driver of biodiversity loss, farmers are increasingly expected to produce environmental outcomes and protect biodiversity. However, lack of attention to the way farmers perceive native vegetation has resulted in conservation targets not being met. The Yorke Peninsula (YP), South Australia, is an agricultural landscape where 50% farmers perceived that long-term planning was for ≤ 30 years, not enough time to promote ecosystem conservation; (5) a lack of natural resource management information for farmers—as a result, (...)
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  44.  43
    Reflecting on ethical and legal issues in wildlife disease.Hamish Mccallum & Barbara Ann Hocking - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (4):336–347.
    Disease in wildlife raises a number of issues that have not been widely considered in the bioethical literature. However, wildlife disease has major implications for human welfare. The majority of emerging human infectious diseases are zoonotic: that is, they occur in humans by cross-species transmission from animal hosts. Managing these diseases often involves balancing concerns with human health against animal welfare and conservation concerns. Many infectious diseases of domestic animals are shared with wild animals, although it is (...)
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  45.  15
    Buddhism and the Ethics of Species Conservation.David E. Cooper & Simon P. James - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (1):85-97.
    Efforts to conserve endangered species of animal are, in some important respects, at odds with Buddhist ethics. On the one hand, being abstract entities, species cannot suffer, and so cannot be proper objects of compassion or similar moral virtues. On the other, Buddhist commitments to equanimity tend to militate against the idea that the individual members of endangered species have greater value than those of less-threatened ones. This paper suggests that the contribution of Buddhism to the issue of species (...) should not, however, be discounted. It argues, on the contrary, that Buddhist traditions, in reminding us of the moral significance of the suffering of individual animals, add an important dimension to debates concerning the ethical justification of efforts to conserve endangered species. (shrink)
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  46.  32
    Changing Perspectives on Wildlife in Southern Africa, C.1840 to C.1914.Jane Carruthers - 2005 - Society and Animals 13 (3):183-200.
    This article analyzes how a number of writers in English articulated their attitudes toward southern Africa's indigenous mammal megafauna from c.1840 to just before the First World War. In changing contexts of declining wild animal numbers, it examines how attitudes and the expression of those attitudes—together with developments in biology—altered with the modernization of government and the economy. To some extent, it also explores the human and other values placed on certain species of animals, including ideas about extinction, notions of (...)
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  47. Captivity for Conservation? Zoos at a Crossroads.Jozef Keulartz - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (2):335-351.
    This paper illuminates a variety of issues that speak to the question of whether ‘captivity for conservation’ can be an ethically acceptable goal of the modern zoo. Reflecting on both theoretical disagreements and practical challenges , the paper explains why the ‘Noah’s Ark’ paradigm is being replaced by an alternative ‘integrated approach.’ It explores the changes in the zoo’s core tasks that the new paradigm implies. And it pays special attention to the changes that would have to be made (...)
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  48. Debating Public Policy: Ethics, Politics and Economics of Wildlife Management in Southern Africa.Matthew Crippen & John Salevurakis - 2019 - In Oguz Kelemen & Gergely Tari (eds.), Bioethics of the “Crazy Ape”. Trivent Publishing. pp. 187-195.
    Based on field research in Africa, this essay explores three claims: first, that sport hunting places economic value on wildlife and habitats; second, that this motivates conservation practices in the interest of sustaining revenue sources; and, third, that this benefits human populations. If true, then sport hunting may sometimes be justifiable on utilitarian grounds. While not dismissing objections from the likes of Singer and Regan, we suggest their views – if converted into policy in desperately impoverished places – (...)
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  49.  26
    From opportunism to nascent conservation.William T. Vickers - 1994 - Human Nature 5 (4):307-337.
    Siona-Secoya hunters of the northwest Amazon strive to maximize short-term yields to provision their households with meat. The observed patterns of hunting more closely resemble the predictions of optimal foraging theory (OFT) than they do a conservation ethic. In the past the Siona-Secoya worried little about conservation because they believed that good shamans attracted abundant game. When hunting was poor, shamans performedyagé ceremonies and appealed to supernatural gamekeepers for the release of more animals from the underworld. The sustainability (...)
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  50. What is a meaningful role? Accounting for culture in fish and wildlife management in rural Alaska.Jeffrey Brooks & Kevin Bartley - 2016 - Human Ecology 44 (5):517-531.
    The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 requires federal agencies to provide a meaningful role for rural subsistence harvesters in management of fish and wildlife in Alaska. We constructed an interpretive analysis of qualitative interviews with residents of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. Stakeholders' perceptions of their roles and motivations to participate in collaborative management are linked to unseen and often ignored cultural features and differing worldviews that influence outcomes of collaboration. Agencies need to better understand Yup'ik preferences (...)
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