Results for 'medical terminology'

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  1. Ontology and Medical Terminology: Why Description Logics Are Not Enough.Werner Ceusters, Barry Smith & Jim Flanagan - 2003 - In Proceedings of the Conference: Towards an Electronic Patient Record (TEPR 2003). Boston, MA: Medical Records Institute.
    Ontology is currently perceived as the solution of first resort for all problems related to biomedical terminology, and the use of description logics is seen as a minimal requirement on adequate ontology-based systems. Contrary to common conceptions, however, description logics alone are not able to prevent incorrect representations; this is because they do not come with a theory indicating what is computed by using them, just as classical arithmetic does not tell us anything about the entities that are added (...)
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  2.  6
    Understanding Medical Terminology.Ronald Singer - 1992 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 35 (2):309-310.
  3. The Ontology-Epistemology Divide: A Case Study in Medical Terminology.OIivier Bodenreider, Barry Smith & Anita Burgun - 2004 - In Achille Varzi & Laure Vieu (eds.), Formal Ontology in Information Systems. Proceedings of the Third International Conference (FOIS 2004). IOS Press.
    Medical terminology collects and organizes the many different kinds of terms employed in the biomedical domain both by practitioners and also in the course of biomedical research. In addition to serving as labels for biomedical classes, these names reflect the organizational principles of biomedical vocabularies and ontologies. Some names represent invariant features (classes, universals) of biomedical reality (i.e., they are a matter for ontology). Other names, however, convey also how this reality is perceived, measured, and understood by health (...)
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  4. Ontology Alignment: Experiences with Medical Terminologies.A. Gangemi, D. Pisanelli & G. Steve - 1998 - In Nicola Guarino (ed.), Formal Ontology in Information Systems. Ios Press.
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  5. Ontology Integration: Experiences with Medical Terminologies.Aldo Gangemi, Domenico Pisanelli & Geri Steve - 1998 - In Nicola Guarino (ed.), Formal Ontology in Information Systems. Ios Press. pp. 46--98.
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  6.  1
    Lexicography and Physicke: The Record of Sixteenth-Century English Medical Terminology.Roderick W. McConchie - 1997 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Medical practitioners of the sixteenth century had their own body of special terms, just like the doctors of this century. McConchie examines medical terminology used in a selection of thirteen medical works published between 1547 and 1612, and compares it with treatment of these words in the Oxford English Dictionary and other dictionaries of today, showing how well - or ill - the specialist terminology of sixteenth-century medical practitioners has been recorded. He compiles a (...)
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  7.  11
    Lexicography and Physicke: The Record of Sixteenth-Century English Medical Terminology. R. W. McConchie.Barbara Traister - 1999 - Isis 90 (3):589-590.
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  8.  61
    Advance Medical Directives: A Proposed New Approach and Terminology From an Islamic Perspective. [REVIEW]Hamdan Al-Jahdali, Salim Baharoon, Abdullah Al Sayyari & Ghiath Al-Ahmad - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):163-169.
    Advance directives are specific competent consumers’ wishes about future medical plans in the event that they become incompetent. Awareness of a patient’s autonomy particularly, in relation to their right to refuse or withdraw treatment, a right for the patient to die from natural causes and interest in end of life issues were among the main reasons for developing and legalizing advance medical directives in developed countries. However, in many circumstances cultural and religious aspects are among many factors that (...)
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  9.  3
    Inappropriate Use of Genetic Terminology in Medical Research: A Public Health Issue.Gordon J. Edlin - 1987 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 31 (1):47.
  10.  13
    Maimonides in Muscovy: Medical Texts and Terminology.W. F. Ryan - 1988 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 51:43-65.
  11.  29
    Galen's Terminology R. J. Durling: A Dictionary of Medical Terms in Galen. (Studies in Ancient Medicine, 5.) Pp. Xiii+344. Leiden, New York, Cologne: E. J. Brill, 1993. Cased, Gld. 200/$114.50. [REVIEW]Helen King - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (01):139-140.
  12.  3
    Penetration of COVID-19 Related Terminology into Legal, Medical, and Journalistic Discourses.Paula Trzaskawka & Joanna Kic-Drgas - 2022 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 35 (3):937-960.
    March 2020 has become a moment of change in communication mode and quality. Previously, the media paid attention to the current affairs, however, never earlier the journalistic discourse has been so influentially affected by the ongoing phenomenon as in the case of COVID-19. Almost overnight the new terminological phenomena with specific legal or medical reference were introduced into everyday language mainly via mass media and become an important part of a pandemic related narration. The strong influence on the shape (...)
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  13. Conceptual and Terminological Confusion Around Personalised Medicine: A Coping Strategy.Giovanni De Grandis & Vidar Halgunset - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-12.
    The idea of personalised medicine (PM) has gathered momentum recently, attracting funding and generating hopes as well as scepticism. As PM gives rise to differing interpretations, there have been several attempts to clarify the concept. In an influential paper published in this journal, Schleidgen and colleagues have proposed a precise and narrow definition of PM on the basis of a systematic literature review. Given that their conclusion is at odds with those of other recent attempts to understand PM, we consider (...)
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  14. SNOMED CT Standard Ontology Based on the Ontology for General Medical Science.Shaker El-Sappagh, Francesco Franda, Ali Farman & Kyung-Sup Kwak - 2018 - BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making 76 (18):1-19.
    Background: Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine—Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT, hereafter abbreviated SCT) is acomprehensive medical terminology used for standardizing the storage, retrieval, and exchange of electronic healthdata. Some efforts have been made to capture the contents of SCT as Web Ontology Language (OWL), but theseefforts have been hampered by the size and complexity of SCT. Method: Our proposal here is to develop an upper-level ontology and to use it as the basis for defining the termsin SCT in a way (...)
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  15.  5
    Science and Terminology in-Between Empires: Ukrainian Science in a Search for its Language in the Nineteenth Century.Jan Surman - 2019 - History of Science 57 (2):260-287.
    Ukrainian science and its terminology in the nineteenth century experienced a number of twists and turns. Divided between two empires, it lacked institutions, scholars pursuing it, and a unified literary language. One could even say that until the late nineteenth century there was a possibility for two communities with two literary languages to emerge – Ruthenian and Ukrainian. Eventually, both communities and languages merged. This article tracks the meanderings of this process, arguing that scholarly publications played a crucial role (...)
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  16. Mistakes in Medical Ontologies: Where Do They Come From and How Can They Be Detected?Werner Ceusters, Barry Smith, Anand Kumar & Christoffel Dhaen - 2004 - Studies in Health and Technology Informatics 102:145-164.
    We present the details of a methodology for quality assurance in large medical terminologies and describe three algorithms that can help terminology developers and users to identify potential mistakes. The methodology is based in part on linguistic criteria and in part on logical and ontological principles governing sound classifications. We conclude by outlining the results of applying the methodology in the form of a taxonomy different types of errors and potential errors detected in SNOMED-CT.
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  17. Medical Linguistics.Kazem Sadegh-Zadeh - 2nd ed. 2015 - In Handbook of Analytic Philosophy of Medicine. Springer Verlag.
    Linguistics, in general, is the basic science of all language studies. It is concerned with the nature and structure of language and with the role it plays in human communication. Medical linguistics uses some methods of general linguistics and also creates additional ones. This is motivated by the following practical needs: Computer-aided data record, storage, and retrieval in medical practice and research require that medical data be stored in such a manner that enables their computational processing. However, (...)
     
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  18.  16
    ‘Missing Persons’: Technical Terminology as a Barrier in Psychiatry.Ciaran Clarke - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (1):23-30.
    Several fields contributing to psychiatric advances, such as psychology, biology, and the humanities, have not yet met to produce a cohesive and integrated picture of human function and dysfunction, strength and vulnerability, etc., despite advances in their own areas. The failure may have its roots in a disagreement on what we mean by the human person and his or her relationship with the world, for which the incommensurate language of these disciplines may be partly to blame. Turns taken by western (...)
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  19.  24
    Medical Foundations of Various Approaches to Medical-Ethical Decision-Making.Rosa Lynn Pinkus - 1981 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 6 (3):295-308.
    Philosophers have long recognized that the unique values of the individual physician effect medical-ethical decision-making. While not taking issue with this basic assumption, this article critically examines one discussion of how different philosophies (existential, utilitarian, and value realist) can influence a neurosurgeon's decision to operate upon a person having a malignant brain tumor. It also delineates and discusses a fund of ‘medical wisdom’ commonly available to any neurosurgeon and easily obtainable by both researcher and patient. The article suggests (...)
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  20.  52
    Medical Futility, Treatment Withdrawal and the Persistent Vegetative State.K. R. Mitchell, I. H. Kerridge & T. J. Lovat - 1993 - Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (2):71-76.
    Why do we persist in the relentless pursuit of artificial nourishment and other treatments to maintain a permanently unconscious existence? In facing the future, if not the present world-wide reality of a huge number of persistent vegetative state (PVS) patients, will they be treated because of our ethical commitment to their humanity, or because of an ethical paralysis in the face of biotechnical progress? The PVS patient is cut off from the normal patterns of human connection and communication, with a (...)
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  21.  13
    Language, Terminology and the Readability of Online Cancer Information.Pam Peters, Adam Smith, Yasmin Funk & John Boyages - 2016 - Medical Humanities 42 (1):36-41.
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  22. The Unified Medical Language System and the Gene Ontology: Some Critical Reflections.Anand Kumar & Barry Smith - 2003 - In A. Günter, R. Kruse & B. Neumann (eds.), KI 2003: Advances in Artificial Intelligence. Berlin: Springer. pp. 135-148.
    The Unified Medical Language System and the Gene Ontology are among the most widely used terminology resources in the biomedical domain. However, when we evaluate them in the light of simple principles for wellconstructed ontologies we find a number of characteristic inadequacies. Employing the theory of granular partitions, a new approach to the understanding of ontologies and of the relationships ontologies bear to instances in reality, we provide an application of this theory in relation to an example drawn (...)
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  23.  78
    Rationing Just Medical Care.Lawrence J. Schneiderman - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (7):7 - 14.
    U.S. politicians and policymakers have been preoccupied with how to pay for health care. Hardly any thought has been given to what should be paid for?as though health care is a commodity that needs no examination?or what health outcomes should receive priority in a just society, i.e., rationing. I present a rationing proposal, consistent with U.S. culture and traditions, that deals not with ?health care,? the terminology used in the current debate, but with the more modest and limited topic (...)
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  24.  33
    Practical Medical Ethics.Alastair V. Campbell - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    This is a practical introduction to the range of ethical questions which doctors and other health-care professionals may be expected to encounter in practice. The books covers both the traditional "end of life" issues and also deals with medical research and consent issues, confidentiality and AIDS, resource allocation, care of the mentally ill, and the doctor/patient relationship. Each chapter canvasses a range of ethical views, drawing both from traditional philosophical responses and the most recent contemporary responses. Theoretical discussion is (...)
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  25.  88
    The Development of "Medical Futility": Towards a Procedural Approach Based on the Role of the Medical Profession.S. Moratti - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):369-372.
    Over the past 50 years, technical advances have taken place in medicine that have greatly increased the possibilities of life-prolonging intervention. The increased possibilities of intervening have brought along new ethical questions. Not everything that is technically possible is appropriate in a specific case: not everything that could be done should be done. In the 1980s, a new term was coined to indicate a class of inappropriate interventions: “medically futile treatment”. A debate followed, with contributions from the USA and several (...)
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  26. Ontology-Based Integration of Medical Coding Systems and Electronic Patient Records.W. Ceusters, Barry Smith & G. De Moor - 2004 - IFOMIS Reports.
    In the last two decades we have witnessed considerable efforts directed towards making electronic healthcare records comparable and interoperable through advances in record architectures and (bio)medical terminologies and coding systems. Deep semantic issues in general, and ontology in particular, have received some interest from the research communities. However, with the exception of work on so-called ‘controlled vocabularies’, ontology has thus far played little role in work on standardization. The prime focus has been rather the rapid population of terminologies at (...)
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  27.  22
    Conceptual Obstacles in Computerized Medical Diagnosis.Victor L. Yu - 1983 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (1):67-76.
    Despite extensive research and a multitude of computer systems, there is no viable computerized system that is even remotely capable of approaching the skill of an expert human physician. Minor obstacles in the design of a practical system include imprecise medical terminology, the use of nonindependent clinical parameters, incorrect or inaccurate information supplied to the computer, and static representation of a patient's medical history. Major problems that go beyond computer manipulation of data include the requirement for a (...)
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  28. Risk Communication and Informed Consent in the Medical Tourism Industry: A Thematic Content Analysis of Canadian Broker Websites. [REVIEW]Kali Penney, Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks & Rory Johnston - 2011 - BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):17-.
    Background: Medical tourism, thought of as patients seeking non-emergency medical care outside of their home countries, is a growing industry worldwide. Canadians are amongst those engaging in medical tourism, and many are helped in the process of accessing care abroad by medical tourism brokers - agents who specialize in making international medical care arrangements for patients. As a key source of information for these patients, brokers are likely to play an important role in communicating the (...)
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  29.  14
    Entities and Relations in Medical Imaging: An Analysis of Computed Tomography Reporting.Dirk Marwede & James Matthew Fielding - 2007 - Applied Ontology 2 (1):67-79.
  30.  8
    On the Notion of (Medical) Invasiveness.Abraham Rudnick - 2011 - Health Care Analysis 19 (2):99-106.
    The relation between the notions of (medical) invasiveness and (actual or potential) harm has not been systematically discussed nor theoretically grounded, despite its importance to clinical-ethical practice. This paper aims to clarify the notion of invasiveness beyond the traditional notion of invasiveness as breaking skin or inserting mechanical objects into the body. The traditional notion of invasiveness is challenged by counterexamples. Three approaches to the notion of disorder applied here are: deviation from what is common; deviation from what is (...)
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  31.  14
    The Multiple Meanings of Translational Research in (Bio)Medical Research.Anne K. Krueger, Barbara Hendriks & Stephan Gauch - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):57.
    Translational research is a buzzword which dominates discussions about the quality, the utilization, and the benefits of medical research. Yet, although translational research has become a prominent topic, no commonly agreed definition of this terminology exists. Instead, experts from different contexts such as biomedical research, clinical practice or nursing discuss translational research in multiple ways depending on how they define the problem that translational research is supposed to be the solution to. In this paper, we do not seek (...)
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  32.  2
    Preprints in Times of COVID19: The Time is Ripe for Agreeing on Terminology and Good Practices.Paul N. Newton, Tammy Hoffmann, E. Bottieau, Peter W. Horby, Laura Merson, Ana Palmero, Amar Jesani, Carlos E. Durán, Aasim Ahmad, Philippe J. Guerin, Jerome Amir Singh, Muhammad H. Zaman, Céline Caillet & Raffaella Ravinetto - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-5.
    Over recent years, the research community has been increasingly using preprint servers to share manuscripts that are not yet peer-reviewed. Even if it enables quick dissemination of research findings, this practice raises several challenges in publication ethics and integrity. In particular, preprints have become an important source of information for stakeholders interested in COVID19 research developments, including traditional media, social media, and policy makers. Despite caveats about their nature, many users can still confuse pre-prints with peer-reviewed manuscripts. If unconfirmed but (...)
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  33.  7
    The multiple meanings of translational research in (bio)medical research.Anne K. Krueger, Barbara Hendriks & Stephan Gauch - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):1-24.
    Translational research is a buzzword which dominates discussions about the quality, the utilization, and the benefits of medical research. Yet, although translational research has become a prominent topic, no commonly agreed definition of this terminology exists. Instead, experts from different contexts such as biomedical research, clinical practice or nursing discuss translational research in multiple ways depending on how they define the problem that translational research is supposed to be the solution to. In this paper, we do not seek (...)
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  34.  5
    The multiple meanings of translational research in (bio)medical research.Anne K. Krueger, Barbara Hendriks & Stephan Gauch - 2019 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 41 (4):1-24.
    Translational research is a buzzword which dominates discussions about the quality, the utilization, and the benefits of medical research. Yet, although translational research has become a prominent topic, no commonly agreed definition of this terminology exists. Instead, experts from different contexts such as biomedical research, clinical practice or nursing discuss translational research in multiple ways depending on how they define the problem that translational research is supposed to be the solution to. In this paper, we do not seek (...)
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  35.  55
    An Ontology-Based Methodology for the Migration of Biomedical Terminologies to Electronic Health Records.Barry Smith & Werner Ceusters - 2005 - In Proceedings of AMIA Symposium 2005, Washington DC,. Washington, DC: AMIA. pp. 704-708.
    Biomedical terminologies are focused on what is general, Electronic Health Records (EHRs) on what is particular, and it is commonly assumed that the step from the one to the other is unproblematic. We argue that this is not so, and that, if the EHR of the future is to fulfill its promise, then the foundations of both EHR architectures and biomedical terminologies need to be reconceived. We accordingly describe a new framework for the treatment of both generals and particulars in (...)
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  36.  15
    Some Ways That Technology and Terminology Distort the Euthanasia Issue.Christopher Herrera - 1993 - Journal of Medical Humanities 14 (1):23-31.
    Technology and terminology often detract from a reasoned appraisal of the euthanasia option, especially in those discussions that argue for euthanasia's incorporation into a beneficence-based medical model. “Beneficent euthanasia,” assuming there is such a thing, poses special challenges to the traditional provider-patient relationship. These challenges argue for well-defined limits of beneficence and a more equitable distribution of responsibility between participants. We should not allow technology and terminology to generate an unrealistic portrayal of patient death and its ramifications. (...)
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  37.  36
    Don't Cry for Us Argentinians: Two Decades of Teaching Medical Humanities.L. E. Acuna - 2000 - Medical Humanities 26 (2):66-70.
    Medical humanities—history, literature, anthropology, ethics and fine arts applied to medicine—play an important role in medical education. For more than 20 years an effort has been made to obtain an academic identity for such a multidisciplinary approach. A distinction between humanitarianism and humanism is attempted here, the former being associated with medical care and the latter with medical education. In order more precisely to define the relationship between the arts and medicine, an alternative term “medical (...)
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  38.  2
    Critical Review of the TransCelerate Template for Clinical Study Reports and Publication of Version 2 of the CORE Reference Terminology Table. [REVIEW]Art Gertel, Walther Seiler, Debbie Jordan, Tracy Farrow, Vivien Fagan, Graham Blakey, Aaron B. Bernstein & Samina Hamilton - 2019 - Research Integrity and Peer Review 4 (1).
    BackgroundCORE Reference is a complete and authoritative open-access user’s guide to support the authoring of clinical study reports for current industry-standard-design interventional studies. CORE Reference is a content guidance resource and is not a CSR Template.TransCelerate Biopharma Inc., an alliance of biopharmaceutical companies, released a CSR Template in November 2018 and recognised CORE Reference as one of two principal sources used in its development.MethodsThe regulatory medical writing and statistical professionals who developed CORE Reference conducted a critical review of the (...)
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  39. Peering Into the Cauldron: An Approach to Enigmatic Terminology in Ancient Texts.S. P. B. Durnford - 2012 - Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 89 (1):85-109.
    Incompletely understood medical texts, like other kinds of technical writing, pose problems that require a multi-disciplinary approach. In addition, the etymological writings of ancient commentators hint at their own cultures priorities and limitations. Progress today, therefore, also depends partly upon how well we can harmonize our own thinking with the beliefs and practices of an alien culture, whose medicine may overlap with culinary and other social uses. A puzzling word may have been reshaped to reflect the supposed properties of (...)
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  40. Arguments for ‘Ocular Donation’ as Standardised Terminology to Reduce the ‘Ick Factor’ of ‘Eye Donation’.Katrina A. Bramstedt - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-108003.
    This brief report presents the global problem of the shortfall of donor corneal tissue for transplantation, a potential root cause, and a potential solution. Specifically, use of the term ‘eye donation’ is a potential hurdle to ocular tissue donation as it can stimulate the ‘ick factor.’ Verbiage such as ‘ocular ’ could be a method of providing terminology that is less emotive than ‘eye donor’ or ‘eye donation.’ The field of transplantation has experienced terminology shifts over time; for (...)
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  41.  11
    Personalized, Precision, and N-of-One Medicine: A Clarification of Terminology and Concepts.Sui Huang & Leroy Hood - 2019 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 62 (4):617-639.
    In the tradition of Western medicine that goes back to Hippocrates, we teach medical students to see beyond the disease and to consider the patient as a whole—to take into account the broader context of family, lifestyle, and environmental exposures. For instance, when measuring blood pressure to diagnose hypertension, family history and situational stress must be considered. Moreover, repeated measurements at multiple time points must be performed to avoid a false-positive diagnosis due to temporary fluctuations of blood pressure. The (...)
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  42.  13
    Race and Ethnicity in Medical Research: Requirements Meet Reality.Margaret A. Winker - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (3):520-525.
    Race and ethnicity are commonly reported variables in biomedical research, but how they were determined is often not described and the rationale for analyzing them is often not provided. JAMA improved the reporting of these factors by implementing a policy and procedure. However, still lacking are careful consideration of what is actually being measured when race/ethnicity is described, consistent terminology, hypothesis-driven justification for analyzing race/ethnicity, and a consistent and generalizable measurement of socioeconomic status. Furthermore, some studies continue to use (...)
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  43.  3
    Race and Ethnicity in Medical Research: Requirements Meet Reality.Margaret A. Winker - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (3):520-525.
    Race and ethnicity are commonly reported variables in biomedical research, but how they were initially determined is often not described and the rationale for analyzing them is often not provided. JAMA improved the reporting of these factors by implementing a policy and procedure for doing so. However, still lacking are careful consideration of what is actually being measured when race/ethnicity is described, consistent terminology, hypothesis-driven justification for analyzing race/ethnicity, and a consistent and generalizable measurement of socioeconomic status. Furthermore, some (...)
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  44.  76
    Welcome to the Wild, Wild North: Conscientious Objection Policies Governing Canada's Medical, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Dental Professions.Jacquelyn Shaw & Jocelyn Downie - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (1):33-46.
    In Canada, as in many developed countries, healthcare conscientious objection is growing in visibility, if not in incidence. Yet the country's health professional policies on conscientious objection are in disarray. The article reports the results of a comprehensive review of policies relevant to conscientious objection for four Canadian health professions: medicine, nursing, pharmacy and dentistry. Where relevant policies exist in many Canadian provinces, there is much controversy and potential for confusion, due to policy inconsistencies and terminological vagueness. Meanwhile, in Canada's (...)
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  45.  2
    Damned If You Do, Doomed If You Don’T”: A Socio-Medical Commentary on “Of Athletes, Bodies and Rules: Making Sense of Caster Semenya.Bryan Holtzman & Kathryn E. Ackerman - 2021 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 49 (4):661-665.
    As medical professionals, we outline the science underlying disorders or differences of sexual development, discuss the nuances of sex and gender and how terminology can differ based on medical vs. non-medical context, briefly review the evidence of the ergogenic effects of hyperandrogenism, and discuss the medical complications with the hormonal contraceptive use currently dictated by World Athletics to allow DSD athletes to compete in the female category.
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  46.  12
    The Limitation of Human Knowledge: Faith and the Empirical Method in John Wesley's Medical Holism.Deborah Madden - 2006 - History of European Ideas 32 (2):162-172.
    In his medical and scientific works John Wesley provided an interpretation of the universe that was structured, though not pre-ordained, by God. The empirical method he adopted was measured in terms of efficacy and judged according to rationalistic standards. Its practical success, however, was used by Wesley to underpin his vocation of practical piety, which developed out of a holistic view of nature inspired by the spiritualism of Primitive Christianity. Accordingly, the providential ordering of Man and nature meant that (...)
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  47.  14
    Feeding Versus Artificial Nutrition and Hydration: At the Boundaries of Medical Intervention and Social Interaction.Sara M. Bergstresser & Erick Castellanos - 2015 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (2):204-225.
    In this article, we examine the emergence of a concept of medical feeding that emphasizes artificiality and medical technology. We discuss how this concept has been created in specific contrast to the daily provision of food and water; medical definitions retain clear disjunctures with cultural and religious beliefs surrounding food, gendered aspects of eating and feeding, and the everyday practices of social and family life in the United States. We begin with an examination of the historical processes (...)
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  48.  7
    Is a Moral Consensus in Medical Ethics Possible?B. Mitchell - 1976 - Journal of Medical Ethics 2 (1):18-23.
    At the moment in Britain and elsewhere the debate inside and outside of Parliament on various medical issues which are essentially moral never ends. Everybody has his own point of view--or principles. But what emerges for society to adopt can often be called in lay terminology 'compromise'. Professor Mitchell argues in this paper that a moral consensus is possible and indeed ought to be achieved, as today the medical practitioner can no longer make his decision only in (...)
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  49.  28
    Doctor-Patient Sexual Relationships in Medical Oaths.S. G. Perez, R. J. Gelpi & A. M. Rancich - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (12):702-705.
    Background: Doctor–patient sexual relationship is considered to be unfair because the first party would be abusing the second party’s vulnerability. The prohibition of this relationship is noted in the Hippocratic oath. Currently, a reprise of the use of oaths in medical schools can be observed.Aim: To determine whether the prohibition has been maintained and how its expression has varied in the oaths during different periods.Methods: 50 oaths were studied: 13 ancient–medieval and 37 modern–contemporary. Of the 50 texts, 19 were (...)
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  50.  11
    John of Alexandria Again: Greek Medical Philosophy in Latin Translation.Vivian Nutton - 1991 - Classical Quarterly 41 (02):509-.
    It is a brave scholar who ventures into the murky world of Late Antique medicine in search of information on earlier theories. Not only may the opinions of a Herophilus or a Galen be distorted by their distant interpreters, but frequently the texts themselves present serious challenges to understanding. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the Latin versions made from Greek philosophical and medical commentaries, which interpose an additional linguistic barrier before one can make sense of sometimes complex (...)
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