Results for ' duty to assist'

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  1.  82
    Duties to assist others and political obligations.George Klosko - 2004 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 3 (2):143-159.
    In response to recent criticisms of traditional theories of political obligation, scholars have advanced moral reasons for complying with the law that focus on natural duties to assist other people who are in need. In discussions of political obligation, these ‘rescue principles’ are presented as alternatives to traditional principles. I argue that theories of political obligation based on rescue principles are not able to fulfill the role theorists assign them. If the underlying assumptions of rescue theories are uncovered, they (...)
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  2. On Satisfying Duties to Assist.Christian Barry & Holly Lawford-Smith - 2019 - In Hilary Greaves & Theron Pummer (eds.), Effective Altruism: Philosophical Issues. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    In this paper, we take up the question of whether there comes a point at which one is no longer morally obliged to do further good, even at very low cost to oneself. More specifically, they ask: under precisely what conditions is it plausible to say that that “point” has been reached? A crude account might focus only on, say, the amount of good the agent has already done, but a moment’s reflection shows that this is indeed too crude. We (...)
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  3.  13
    Self‐Ownership and the Duty to Assist.Jesse Spafford - 2022 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 39 (5):857-869.
    Libertarians are attracted to the self-ownership thesis because it seems to satisfy four important theoretical desiderata. First, the thesis treats all persons equally by assigning them the same initial set of rights. Second, the thesis gives people the strongest set of ownership rights possible. Third, it assigns persons a determinate set of rights. And, finally, it grounds the libertarian rejection of a duty to assist, benefit, or rescue others. This article argues that these four desiderata cannot be simultaneously (...)
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  4.  35
    In defense of the duty to assist: a response to critics on the viability of a Rawlsian approach to climate change.Sarah Kenehan - 2015 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 18 (3):308-327.
  5. Sustainability, Public Health, and the Corporate Duty to Assist.Julian Friedland - 2015 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 34 (2):215-236.
    Several European and North American states encourage or even require, via good Samaritan and duty to rescue laws, that persons assist others in distress. This paper offers a utilitarian and contractualist defense of this view as applied to corporations. It is argued that just as we should sometimes frown on bad Samaritans who fail to aid persons in distress, we should also frown on bad corporate Samaritans who neglect to use their considerable multinational power to undertake disaster relief (...)
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  6. Duties to the Distant: Aid, Assistance, and Intervention in the Developing World.Dale Jamieson - 2005 - The Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):151-170.
    In his classic article, Famine, Affluence, and Morality, pp. 229–243), Peter Singer claimed that affluent people in the developed world are morally obligated to transfer large amounts of resources to poor people in the developing world. For present purposes I will not call Singers argument into question. While people can reasonably disagree about exactly how demanding morality is with respect to duties to the desperate, there is little question in my mind that it is much more demanding than common sense (...)
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  7. Duties to the distant: Humanitarian aid, development assistance, and humanitarian intervention.Dale Jamieson - 2005 - The Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2).
     
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  8.  57
    Rights, justice, and duties to provde assistance: A critique of Regan's theory of rights.Dale Jamieson - 1990 - Ethics 100 (2):349-362.
  9.  25
    The Duty of States to Assist Other States in Need: Ethics, Human Rights, and International Law.Lawrence O. Gostin & Robert Archer - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):526-533.
    In this article, Gostin and Archer explore the varied lenses through which governments are obligated to address humanitarian needs. States’responsibilities to help others derive from domestic law, political commitments, ethical values, national interests, and international law. What is needed, however, is clarity and detailed standards so that States can operationalize this responsibility, making it real for developing countries. Transnational cooperation needs to be more effective and consistent to provide assistance for the world's poorest and least healthy people.
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  10.  11
    The Duty of States to Assist other States in Need: Ethics, Human Rights, and International Law.Lawrence O. Gostin & Robert Archer - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):526-533.
    This article deals with a foreign policy question of extraordinary importance: what responsibilities do States have to provide economic and technical assistance to other States that have high levels of need affecting the health and life of their citizens? The question is important for a variety of reasons. There exist massive inequalities in health globally, with the result that poorer countries shoulder a disproportionate burden of disease and premature death. Average life expectancy in Africa is nearly 30 years shorter than (...)
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  11.  18
    Wild Animals and Duties of Assistance.Beka Jalagania - 2021 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 34 (2):1-15.
    Is there a moral requirement to assist wild animals suffering due to natural causes? According to the laissez-faire intuition, although we may have special duties to assist wild animals, there are no general requirements to care for them. If this view is right, then our positive duties toward wild animals can be only special, grounded in special circumstances. In this article I present the contribution argument which employs the thought that the receipt of benefits from wild animals is (...)
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  12.  34
    Rights, Justice, and Duties to Provide Assistance: A Critique of Regan's Theory of Rights* Dale Jamieson.Lori Gruen, Betsy Israel, James W. Nickel & Peter Singer - 1990 - Ethics 100 (2):349-362.
  13.  30
    Assisted suicide and the duty to die.Griffin Trotter - 2000 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 11 (3):260.
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  14.  80
    The duty to aid nonhuman animals in dire need.John Hadley - 2006 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (4):445–451.
    abstract Most moral philosophers accept that we have obligations to provide at least some aid and assistance to distant strangers in dire need. Philosophers who extend rights and obligations to nonhuman animals, however, have been less than explicit about whether we have any positive duties to free‐roaming or ‘wild’ animals. I argue our obligations to free‐roaming nonhuman animals in dire need are essentially no different to those we have to severely cognitively impaired distant strangers. I address three objections to the (...)
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  15.  99
    A Duty to Resist: When Disobedience Should Be Uncivil.Candice Delmas - 2018 - New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    What are our responsibilities in the face of injustice? How far should we go to fight it? Many would argue that as long as a state is nearly just, citizens have a moral duty to obey the law. Proponents of civil disobedience generally hold that, given this moral duty, a person needs a solid justification to break the law. But activists from Henry David Thoreau and Mohandas Gandhi to the Movement for Black Lives have long recognized that there (...)
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  16.  95
    A Duty to Adopt?Daniel Friedrich - 2013 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):25-39.
    All over the world millions of children are without parental care. As a consequence they are liable to suffer serious harm. I argue the general duty to assist those in need extends to children without parental care and that some people are under a moral duty to adopt rather than have biological children. I defend this claim against the following objections: (1) intimate decisions are excluded from the duty to assist, (2) adopting children is too (...)
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  17. The Implications of Failing to Assist.Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland - 2014 - Social Theory and Practice 40 (4):570-590.
    In this essay we argue that an agent’s failure to assist someone in need at one time can change the cost she can be morally required to take on to assist that same person at a later time. In particular, we show that the cost the agent can subsequently be required to take on to help the person in need can increase quite significantly, and can be enforced through the proportionate use of force. We explore the implications of (...)
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  18. The duty to eradicate global poverty: Positive or negative?Pablo Gilabert - 2005 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (5):537-550.
    In World Poverty and Human Rights, Thomas Pogge argues that the global rich have a duty to eradicate severe poverty in the world. The novelty of Pogges approach is to present this demand as stemming from basic commands which are negative rather than positive in nature: the global rich have an obligation to eradicate the radical poverty of the global poor not because of a norm of beneficence asking them to help those in need when they can at little (...)
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  19.  23
    Unlocking the beauty of the imperfect duty to aid: Sen's idea of the duty of assistance.Susan Murphy - 2014 - Journal of Global Ethics 10 (3):369-383.
    This paper examines the links between acting upon a duty to assist, responsibility for these actions, and how such actions link with incremental moral duties that can amass as a consequence of such action. More specifically, this paper is concerned with practices of international aid and assistance, whereby public and privately funded donations enable the actions of parties outside of the territorial and jurisdictional boundaries of a community and state to directly influence the functioning of that community, and (...)
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  20.  26
    The Duty to Rescue and Investigators' Obligations.Douglas MacKay & Tina Rulli - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):71-105.
    The duty to rescue is a highly plausible and powerful ethical principle. It requires agents to assist others in extreme need in cases where doing so does not conflict with some weighty moral aim; requires little personal sacrifice; and is likely to significantly benefit the recipients.1 As a general obligation, it binds all persons simply qua persons, and it is owed to all persons simply qua persons. Clinical investigators working in low-income countries frequently encounter sick or destitute people (...)
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  21.  50
    The duty to feed in cases of advanced dementia.Shabbir M. H. Alibhai - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (1):37-52.
    Cases of dementia present us with difficult ethical dilemmas as we strive to care for those unable to care for themselves. In this article, I review the relevant Islamic texts on caring for the ill, alleviating suffering, and feeding the hungry-all in light of the modern clinical environment. I find that the ethical appropriateness of tube feeding at the end of life is not as clear-cut as it may seem. My analysis, however, suggests that Muslim scholars ought to favor insertion (...)
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  22.  14
    Rawls’s duty of assistance and relative deprivation: Why less is more and more is even more.Jan Niklas Rolf - 2018 - Journal of International Political Theory 16 (1):25-46.
    John Rawls’s case for a duty of assistance is partially premised on the assumption that liberal societies have an interest in assisting burdened societies to become well-ordered: Not only are well-...
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  23. Is Poverty Our Problem? Introduction to the forum on world poverty and the duty of assistance.Alex Voorhoeve - 2006 - The Philosophers' Magazine 36 (4th qu):46-49.
    This paper provides an introductory discussion of questions about three moral duties in the context of global poverty: the duty to aid; the duty not to harm; and the duty to promote just global institutions.
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  24.  5
    The Duty to Aid Nonhuman Animals in Dire Need.John Hadley - 2006 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (4):445-451.
    abstract Most moral philosophers accept that we have obligations to provide at least some aid and assistance to distant strangers in dire need. Philosophers who extend rights and obligations to nonhuman animals, however, have been less than explicit about whether we have any positive duties to free‐roaming or ‘wild’ animals. I argue our obligations to free‐roaming nonhuman animals in dire need are essentially no different to those we have to severely cognitively impaired distant strangers. I address three objections to the (...)
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  25. To Assist or Not to Assist? Assessing the Potential Moral Costs of Humanitarian Intervention in Nature.Kyle Johannsen - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (1):29-45.
    In light of the extent of wild animal suffering, some philosophers have adopted the view that we should cautiously assist wild animals on a large scale. Recently, their view has come under criticism. According to one objection, even cautious intervention is unjustified because fallibility is allegedly intractable. By contrast, a second objection states that we should abandon caution and intentionally destroy habitat in order to prevent wild animals from reproducing. In my paper, I argue that intentional habitat destruction is (...)
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  26.  64
    A case for a duty to feed the hungry: GM plants and the third world.Lucy Carter - 2007 - Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (1):69-82.
    This article is concerned with a discussion of the plausibility of the claim that GM technology has the potential to provide the hungry with sufficient food for subsistence. Following a brief outline of the potential applications of GM in this context, a history of the green revolution and its impact will be discussed in relation to the current developing world agriculture situation. Following a contemporary analysis of malnutrition, the claim that GM technology has the potential to provide the hungry with (...)
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  27. Duties to the Global Poor and Minimalism about Global Justice.Alex Rajczi - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):65-89.
    This paper is about the implications of a common view on global justice. The view can be called the Minimalist View, and it says that we have no positive duties to help the poor in foreign countries, or that if we do, they are very minimal. It might seem as if, by definition, the Minimalist View cannot require that we do very much about global poverty. However, in his book World Poverty and Human Rights, Thomas Pogge pointed out that this (...)
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  28. Duty to Die: Dužnost umiranja.Milica Urban & Elvio Baccarini - 2010 - Prolegomena 9 (1):45-69.
    In contemporary debates on euthanasia, physician assisted suicide and withholding and withdrawing life prolonging treatments, besides commonly used reasons, which are based on presumption of freedom and avoidance of pain, there is also an idea of a duty to die. Given that individuals are also members of society, and that they have families and loved ones, it is necessary to discuss cases when illness causes severe burdens for lives of loved ones. We consider that patient’s just assessment of (...) to die can be legitimate candidate for justification of procedure of acceleration of death, taken care of necessary conditions of justified social support for patients and necessary aliment from family and society. In this paper we examine main features of duty to die thesis, extract objections, and offer guidelines for continued discussion. We also want to express the importance of establishing social circumstances and preconditions for protecting the individuals.U suvremenim raspravama o eutanaziji i liječnički potpomognutom samoubojstvu, te odustajanju od tretmana, osim uobičajenih razloga koji se temelje na slobodi i izbjegavanju patnje osobe koja traži ubrzavanje smrti, postoji i teza o dužnosti umiranja. S obzirom na to da je pojedinac ujedno i član zajednice, odnosno da ima obitelj i voljene, nužno je raspraviti o slučajevima kada bolest izaziva značajne teškoće za život njegovih bližnjih. Smatramo kako i pacijentova pravedna prosudba o dužnosti umiranja može biti legitiman kandidat za opravdanje postupaka ubrzavanja smrti, uz nužne preduvjete pravedne društvene podrške pacijentu i dužne skrbi od strane obitelji i društva. U ovom tekstu razlažemo osnovne značajke teze o dužnosti umiranja, izdvajamo prigovore i dajemo smjernice za nastavak rasprave te izražavamo važnost ustanovljavanja društvenih okolnosti i preduvjete za zaštitu pojedinaca. (shrink)
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  29. Epistemic Privilege and Victims’ Duties to Resist their Oppression.Ashwini Vasanthakumar - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (3):465-480.
    Victims of injustice are prominent protagonists in efforts to resist injustice. I argue that they have a duty to do so. Extant accounts of victims’ duties primarily cast these duties as self-regarding duties or duties based on collective identities and commitments. I provide an account of victims’ duties to resist injustice that is grounded in the duty to assist. I argue that victims are epistemically privileged with respect to injustice and are therefore uniquely positioned to assist (...)
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  30. How Demanding is the Duty of Assistance?Mark Navin - 2013 - In Win-Chiat Lee & Helen Stacy (eds.), Economic Justice. Springer. pp. 205-220.
    Among Anglo-American philosophers, contemporary debates about global economic justice have often focused upon John Rawls’s Law of Peoples. While critics and advocates of this work disagree about its merits, there is wide agreement that, if today’s wealthiest societies acted in accordance with Rawls’s Duty of Assistance, there would be far less global poverty. I am skeptical of this claim. On my view, the Duty of Assistance is unlikely to require the kinds and amounts of assistance that would be (...)
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  31.  34
    Duties to the Global Poor and Minimalism about Global Justice.Alex Rajczi - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):65-89.
    This paper is about the implications of a common view on global justice. The view can be called the Minimalist View, and it says that we have no positive duties to help the poor in foreign countries, or that if we do, they are very minimal. It might seem as if, by definition, the Minimalist View cannot require that we do very much about global poverty. However, in his book World Poverty and Human Rights, Thomas Pogge pointed out that this (...)
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  32.  45
    The Obligations of Transnational Corporations: Rawlsian Justice and the Duty of Assistance.Nien-hê Hsieh - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (4):643-661.
    Building on John Rawls’s account of the Law of Peoples, this paper examines the grounds and scope of the obligations of transnational corporations that are owned by members of developed economies and operate in developing economies. The paper advances two broad claims. First, the paper argues that there are conditions under which TNCs have obligations to fulfill a limited duty of assistance toward those living in developing economies, even though the duty is normally understood to fall on the (...)
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  33.  29
    The Obligations of Transnational Corporations: Rawlsian Justice and the Duty of Assistance.Nien-hê Hsieh - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (4):643-661.
    Building on John Rawls’s account of the Law of Peoples, this paper examines the grounds and scope of the obligations of transnational corporations (TNCs) that are owned by members of developed economies and operate in developing economies. The paper advances two broad claims. First, the paper argues that there are conditions under which TNCs have obligations to fulfill a limited duty of assistance toward those living in developing economies, even though the duty is normally understood to fall on (...)
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  34. Paternalism and Duties to Self.Michael Cholbi - 2018 - In Kalle Grill & Jason Hanna (eds.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Paternalism. pp. 108-118.
    Here I pursue two main aims: (1) to articulate and defend a Kantian conception of duties to self, and (2) to explore the ramifications of such duties for the moral justification of paternalism. I conclude that there is a distinctive reason to resent paternalistic intercessions aimed at assisting others in fulfilling their duties to self (or the self-regarding virtues necessary thereunto), based on the fact that the goods realized via their fulfillment are historical, i.e., their value depends on an individual's (...)
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  35. Is There a Duty to Die?John Hardwig - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (2):34-42.
    When Richard Lamm made the statement that old people have a duty to die, it was generally shouted down or ridiculed. The whole idea is just too preposterous to entertain. Or too threatening. In fact, a fairly common argument against legalizing physician-assisted suicide is that if it were legal, some people might somehow get the idea that they have a duty to die. These people could only be the victims of twisted moral reasoning or vicious social pressure. It (...)
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  36.  6
    Covid-19 and our Duty to Die.Jose Luis Guerrero Quiñones - 2021 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 77 (2-3):769-790.
    When considering our own death, we normally weigh its impact on the people we love and care about, as well as worrying about the way in which our life might end, hoping that not too much suffering precedes it. However, such view, despite necessary, is a passive understanding of death, interpreted as something that merely happens to us, where we would have some control over timing if physician-assisted dying were legal in our countries. But what if our relation to death (...)
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  37.  53
    Are We Morally Obligated to Assist Climate Change Migrants?Katrina M. Wyman - 2013 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 7 (2):185-212.
    There is considerable concern that climate change will displace many people in developing countries from their homes. This article examines whether developed countries are morally obligated to assist people displaced by climate change in developing countries. The article argues that there may not be a moral duty to assist climate change migrants as a category. Nonetheless, developed countries may have duties to assist vulnerable people elsewhere and may be obligated to assist climate change migrants along (...)
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  38. Is There a Duty to Die?: And Other Essays in Bio-Ethics.John Hardwig - 2000 - Routledge.
    Amid the controversies surrounding physician-assisted suicides, euthanasia, and long-term care for the elderly, a major component in the ethics of medicine is notably absent: the rights and welfare of the survivor's family, for whom serious illness and death can be emotionally and financially devastating. In this collection of eight provocative and timely essays, John Hardwig sets forth his views on the need to replace patient-centered bioethics with family-centered bioethics. Starting with a critique of the awkward language with which philosphers argue (...)
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  39.  35
    Fairness in international economic cooperation: moving beyond Rawls’s duty of assistance.Sylvie Loriaux - 2012 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (1):19-39.
    In this paper, I will argue that Rawls?s duty of assistance offers an incomplete picture of our international social and economic responsibilities. I will start by presenting the two main interpretations of the ?Rawlsian circumstances of egalitarian distributive justice? ? the first requiring the existence of a ?certain kind? of cooperation, the second the existence of a ?certain kind? of interaction with the will ? and then show that none of them rules out the applicability of international principles of (...)
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  40.  20
    Expanding the Duty to Rescue to Climate Migration.David N. Hoffman, Anne Zimmerman, Camille Castelyn & Srajana Kaikini - 2022 - Voices in Bioethics 8.
    Photo by Jonathan Ford on Unsplash ABSTRACT Since 2008, an average of twenty million people per year have been displaced by weather events. Climate migration creates a special setting for a duty to rescue. A duty to rescue is a moral rather than legal duty and imposes on a bystander to take an active role in preventing serious harm to someone else. This paper analyzes the idea of expanding a duty to rescue to climate migration. We (...)
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  41.  33
    From empathy to assisted dying: an argument.Philip A. Berry - 2013 - Clinical Ethics 8 (1):5-8.
    Assisted dying (AD) has not been legalized despite a number of presentations to parliament. It is necessary for doctors who support AD to justify themselves in the context of repeated legislative failure. This article describes the author's personal approach to the problem, one that prioritizes respect for autonomy above legal or societal objections. It is argued that for debilitated patients, the preservation of autonomy depends on a doctor's empathy and willingness to advocate. This sequence can be interrupted by externally and (...)
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  42.  40
    A Moral Grounding of the Duty to Further Justice in Commercial Life.Wim Dubbink - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (1):27-45.
    This paper argues that economic agents, including corporations, have the duty to further justice, not just a duty merely to comply with laws and do their share. The duty to further justice is the requirement to assist in the establishment of just arrangements when they do not exist in society. The paper is grounded in liberal theory and draws heavily on one liberal theorist, Kant. We show that the duty to further justice must be interpreted (...)
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  43.  14
    Forget Evil: Autonomy, the Physician–Patient Relationship, and the Duty to Refer.Jake Greenblum & T. J. Kasperbauer - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):313-317.
    Aulisio and Arora argue that the moral significance of value imposition explains the moral distinction between traditional conscientious objection and non-traditional conscientious objection. The former objects to directly performing actions, whereas the latter objects to indirectly assisting actions on the grounds that indirectly assisting makes the actor morally complicit. Examples of non-traditional conscientious objection include objections to the duty to refer. Typically, we expect physicians who object to a practice to refer, but the non-traditional conscientious objector physician refuses to (...)
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  44.  17
    Balancing health worker well-being and duty to care: an ethical approach to staff safety in COVID-19 and beyond.Rosalind J. McDougall, Lynn Gillam, Danielle Ko, Isabella Holmes & Clare Delany - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (5):318-323.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the risks that can be involved in healthcare work. In this paper, we explore the issue of staff safety in clinical work using the example of personal protective equipment in the COVID-19 crisis. We articulate some of the specific ethical challenges around PPE currently being faced by front-line clinicians, and develop an approach to staff safety that involves balancing duty to care and personal well-being. We describe each of these values, and present a decision-making (...)
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  45.  94
    Criminal Parental Responsibility: Blaming parents on the basis of their duty to control versus their duty to morally educate their children.Leonie Le Sage & Doret De Ruyter - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):789-802.
    Several states in the United States of America and countries in Europe punish parents when their minor child commits a crime. When parents are being punished for the crimes committed by their children, it should be presumed that parents might be held responsible for the deeds of their children. This article addresses the question whether or not this presumption can be sustained. We argue that parents can be blamed for the crimes of their children, not because they have the (...) to control their children as is often maintained, but because they have the duty to assist their child to develop in such a way that s/he becomes a morally competent agent. (shrink)
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  46.  26
    Aid-in-dying laws and the physician's duty to inform.Mara Buchbinder - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (10):666-669.
    On 19 July 2016, three medical organisations filed a federal lawsuit against representatives from several Vermont agencies over the Patient Choice and Control at End of Life Act. The law is similar to aid-in-dying laws in four other US states, but the lawsuit hinges on a distinctive aspect of Vermont's law pertaining to patients' rights to information. The lawsuit raises questions about whether, and under what circumstances, there is an ethical obligation to inform terminally ill patients about AID as an (...)
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  47.  56
    Criminal parental responsibility: Blaming parents on the basis of their duty to control versus their duty to morally educate their children.Doret Ruyter Leonie le Sagdee - 2008 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):789-802.
    Several states in the United States of America and countries in Europe punish parents when their minor child commits a crime. When parents are being punished for the crimes committed by their children, it should be presumed that parents might be held responsible for the deeds of their children. This article addresses the question whether or not this presumption can be sustained. We argue that parents can be blamed for the crimes of their children, not because they have the (...) to control their children as is often maintained, but because they have the duty to assist their child to develop in such a way that s/he becomes a morally competent agent. (shrink)
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  48.  1
    Global Health Disparity and Pharmaceutical Companies’ Obligation to Assist.Anita Ho - 2017 - In Dien Ho (ed.), Philosophical Issues in Pharmaceutics: Development, Dispensing, and Use. Springer.
    This chapter critically explores the extent to which pharmaceutical companies have a moral obligation to assist poor patients in least developed countries who currently have no or inadequate access to lifesaving medications. Focusing on the ongoing HIV/AIDS epidemic in LDCs, the first section of this essay begins with some background information of the disproportionate burden of HIV/AIDS in LDCs. The second section provides a brief overview of some of the salient arguments for holding multinational antiretroviral treatment manufacturers as morally (...)
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  49.  5
    Assistance, Emergency Relief and the Duty Not to Harm – Rawls’ and Cosmopolitan Approaches to Distributive Justice Combined.Annette Förster - 2018 - In Nurdane Şimsek, Stephen Snyder & Manuel Knoll (eds.), New Perspectives on Distributive Justice: Deep Disagreements, Pluralism, and the Problem of Consensus. De Gruyter. pp. 329-344.
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  50.  13
    Why (Some) Corporations Have Positive Duties to (Some of) the Global Poor.Tadhg Ó Laoghaire - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    Many corporations are large, powerful, and wealthy. There are massive shortfalls of global justice, with hundreds of millions of people in the world living below the threshold of extreme poverty, and billions more living not far above that threshold. Where injustice and needs shortfalls must be remediated, we often look towards agents’ capabilities to determine who ought to bear the costs of rectifying the situation. The combination of these three claims grounds what I call a ‘linkage-based’ account of why corporations (...)
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