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A. John Simmons [63]J. Aaron Simmons [42]Keith Simmons [26]Edward D. Simmons [17]
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A. John Simmons
University of Virginia
J. Aaron Simmons
Furman University
Alison Simmons
Harvard University
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  1. Ideal and Nonideal Theory.A. John Simmons - 2010 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 38 (1):5-36.
  2. Moral Principles and Political Obligations.A. John Simmons - 1979 - Princeton University Press.
    Every political theorist will need this book . . . . It is more 'important' than 90% of the work published in philosophy."--Joel Feinberg, University of Arizona.
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  3. Justification and Legitimacy.A. John Simmons - 1999 - Ethics 109 (4):739-771.
    In this essay I will discuss the relationship between two of the most basic ideas in political and legal philosophy: the justification of the state and state legitimacy. I plainly cannot aspire here to a complete account of these matters; but I hope to be able to say enough to motivate a way of thinking about the relation between these notions that is, I believe, superior to the approach which seems to be dominant in contemporary political philosophy. Today showing that (...)
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  4.  63
    Universality and the Liar: An Essay on Truth and the Diagonal Argument.Keith Simmons - 1993 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about one of the most baffling of all paradoxes – the famous Liar paradox. Suppose we say: 'We are lying now'. Then if we are lying, we are telling the truth; and if we are telling the truth we are lying. This paradox is more than an intriguing puzzle, since it involves the concept of truth. Thus any coherent theory of truth must deal with the Liar. Keith Simmons discusses the solutions proposed by medieval philosophers and offers (...)
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  5.  5
    Moral Principles and Political Obligations.A. John Simmons - 1979 - Princeton University Press.
    Outlining the major competing theories in the history of political and moral philosophy--from Locke and Hume through Hart, Rawls, and Nozick--John Simmons attempts to understand and solve the ancient problem of political obligation. Under what conditions and for what reasons, he asks, are we morally bound to obey the law and support the political institutions of our countries?
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  6.  28
    P-Curve: A Key to the File-Drawer.Uri Simonsohn, Leif D. Nelson & Joseph P. Simmons - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (2):534-547.
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  7. Ontological Pluralism and the Generic Conception of Being.Byron Simmons - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-19.
    Ontological pluralism is the view that there are different fundamental ways of being. Trenton Merricks has recently raised three objections to combining pluralism with a generic way of being enjoyed by absolutely everything there is: first, that the resulting view contradicts the pluralist’s core intuition; second, that it is especially vulnerable to the charge—due to Peter van Inwagen—that it posits a difference in being where there is simply a difference in kind; and, third, that it is in tension with various (...)
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  8. Truth.Simon Blackburn & Keith Simmons (eds.) - 1999 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    This volume is designed to set out some of the central issues in the theory of truth. It draws together, for the first time, the debates between philosophers who favor 'robust' or 'substantive' theories of truth, and those other, 'deflationist' or minimalists, who deny that such theories can be given. The editors provide a substantial introduction, in which they look at how the debates relate to further issues, such as the Liar paradox and formal truth theories.
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  9.  13
    Boundaries of Authority.A. John Simmons - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Modern states claim rights of jurisdiction and control over particular geographical areas and their associated natural resources. Boundaries of Authority explores the possible moral bases for such territorial claims by states, in the process arguing that many of these territorial claims in fact lack any moral justification. The book maintains throughout that the requirement of states' justified authority over persons has normative priority over, and as a result severely restricts, the kinds of territorial rights that states can justifiably claim, and (...)
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  10. Moral Principles and Political Obligations.A. John Simmons - 1980 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 87 (4):568-568.
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  11. A Thousand Pleasures Are Not Worth a Single Pain: The Compensation Argument for Schopenhauer's Pessimism.Byron Simmons - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):120-136.
    Pessimism is, roughly, the view that life is not worth living. In chapter 46 of the second volume of The World as Will and Representation, Arthur Schopenhauer provides an oft-neglected argument for this view. The argument is that a life is worth living only if it does not contain any uncompensated evils; but since all our lives happen to contain such evils, none of them are worth living. The now standard interpretation of this argument (endorsed by Kuno Fischer and Christopher (...)
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  12. In Defense of the Moral Significance of Empathy.Aaron Simmons - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (1):97-111.
    It is commonly suggested that empathy is a morally important quality to possess and that a failure to properly empathize with others is a kind of moral failure. This suggestion assumes that empathy involves caring for others’ well-being. Skeptics challenge the moral importance of empathy by arguing that empathy is neither necessary nor sufficient to care for others’ well-being. This challenge is misguided. Although some forms of empathy may not be morally important, empathy with another’s basic well-being concerns is both (...)
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  13.  47
    Beyond STS: A Research‐Based Framework for Socioscientific Issues Education.Dana L. Zeidler, Troy D. Sadler, Michael L. Simmons & Elaine V. Howes - 2005 - Science Education 89 (3):357-377.
  14. Changing the Cartesian Mind: Leibniz on Sensation, Representation and Consciousness.Alison Simmons - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):31-75.
    What did Leibniz have to contribute to the philosophy of mind? To judge from textbooks in the philosophy of mind, and even Leibniz commentaries, the answer is: not much. That may be because Leibniz’s philosophy of mind looks roughly like a Cartesian philosophy of mind. Like Descartes and his followers, Leibniz claims that the mind is immaterial and immortal; that it is a thinking thing ; that it is a different kind of thing from body and obeys its own laws; (...)
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  15.  26
    Hobbesian Moral and Political Theory.A. John Simmons - 1989 - Philosophical Review 98 (3):404.
  16. Justification and Legitimacy: Essays on Rights and Obligations.A. John Simmons - 2003 - Law and Philosophy 22 (2):195-216.
    A. John Simmons is widely regarded as one of the most innovative and creative of today's political philosophers. His work on political obligation is regarded as definitive and he is also internationally respected as an interpreter of John Locke. The characteristic features of clear argumentation and careful scholarship that have been hallmarks of his philosophy are everywhere evident in this collection. The essays focus on the problems of political obligation and state legitimacy as well as on historical theories of property (...)
     
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  17. Is There a Duty to Obey the Law?Christopher Wellman & John Simmons - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    The central question in political philosophy is whether political states have the right to coerce their constituents and whether citizens have a moral duty to obey the commands of their state. In this 2005 book, Christopher Heath Wellman and A. John Simmons defend opposing answers to this question. Wellman bases his argument on samaritan obligations to perform easy rescues, arguing that each of us has a moral duty to obey the law as his or her fair share of the communal (...)
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  18. Recognizing One's Own Face.Tilo T. J. Kircher, Carl Senior, Mary L. Phillips, Sophia Rabe-Hesketh, Philip J. Benson, Edward T. Bullmore, Mick Brammer, Andrew Simmons, Mathias Bartels & Anthony S. David - 2001 - Cognition 78 (1):B1-B15.
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  19. The Use of Force Against Deflationism: Assertion and Truth.Dorit Bar-On & Keith Simmons - 2007 - In Dirk Greimann & Geo Siegwart (eds.), Truth and Speech Acts: Studies in the Philosophy of Language. Routledge. pp. 61--89.
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  20. Are Cartesian Sensations Representational?Alison Simmons - 1999 - Noûs 33 (3):347-369.
  21.  17
    Algorithm Aversion: People Erroneously Avoid Algorithms After Seeing Them Err.Berkeley J. Dietvorst, Joseph P. Simmons & Cade Massey - 2015 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 144 (1):114-126.
  22. Cartesian Consciousness Reconsidered.Alison Simmons - 2012 - Philosophers' Imprint 12.
    Descartes revolutionized our conception of the mind by identifying consciousness as the mark of the mental: all and only thoughts are conscious. Today the idea that all thoughts are conscious seems obviously wrong. Worse, however, Descartes himself seems to posit a whole host of unconscious thoughts. Something is not as it seems. Either Descartes is remarkably inconsistent, or his claim that all thought is conscious is more nuanced than it appears. In this paper I argue that while Descartes was indeed (...)
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  23. Associative Political Obligations.A. John Simmons - 1996 - Ethics 106 (2):247-273.
    It is claimed by philosophers as diverse as Burke, Walzer, Dworkin, and MacIntyre that our political obligations are best understood as "associative" or "communal" obligations--that is, as obligations that require neither voluntary undertaking nor justification by "external" moral principles, but rather as "local" moral responsibilities whose normative weight derives entirely from their assignment by social practice. This paper identifies three primary lines of argument that appear to support such assertions: conceptual arguments, the arguments of nonvoluntarist contract theory, and communitarian arguments (...)
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  24. Justification and Legitimacy: Essays on Rights and Obligations.A. John Simmons (ed.) - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    A. John Simmons is widely regarded as one of the most innovative and creative of today's political philosophers. His work on political obligation is regarded as definitive and he is also internationally respected as an interpreter of John Locke. The characteristic features of clear argumentation and careful scholarship that have been hallmarks of his philosophy are everywhere evident in this collection. The essays focus on the problems of political obligation and state legitimacy as well as on historical theories of property (...)
     
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  25.  27
    On the Territorial Rights of States.A. John Simmons - 2001 - Philosophical Issues 11 (1):300-326.
  26. The Principle of Fair Play.A. John Simmons - 1979 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 8 (4):307-337.
  27. Tacit Consent and Political Obligation.A. John Simmons - 1976 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 5 (3):274-291.
  28.  98
    Pattern of Neuronal Activity Associated with Conscious and Unconscious Processing of Visual Signals.Arash Sahraie, Lawrence Weiskrantz, J. L. Barbur, Alison Simmons & M. Brammer - 1997 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Usa 94:9406-9411.
  29.  1
    Christian Philosophy: Conceptions, Continuations, and Challenges.J. Aaron Simmons (ed.) - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    The contributors consider the idea of Christian philosophy in light of current debates in such areas as philosophy of religion, moral theory, epistemology, and metaphysics in order to show that these important historical questions continue to press upon us today.
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  30. Sensible Ends: Latent Teleology in Descartes' Account of Sensation.Alison J. Simmons - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (1):49-75.
  31.  63
    Historical Rights and Fair Shares.A. John Simmons - 1995 - Law and Philosophy 14 (2):149 - 184.
    My aim of this paper is to clarify, and in a certain very limited way to defend, historical theories of property rights (and their associated theories of social or distributive justice). It is important, I think, to better understand historical rights for several reasons: first, because of the extent to which historical theories capture commonsense, unphilosophical views about property and justice; then, because historical theories have fallen out of philosophical fashion, and are consequently not much scrutinized anymore; and finally, because (...)
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  32.  48
    Embedding Corporate Social Responsibility in Corporate Governance: A Stakeholder Systems Approach.Chris Mason & John Simmons - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):77-86.
    Current research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) illustrates the growing sense of discord surrounding the ‘business of doing good’ (Dobers and Springett, Corp Soc Responsib Environ Manage 17(2):63–69, 2010). Central to these concerns is that CSR risks becoming an over-simplified and peripheral part of corporate strategy. Rather than transforming the dominant corporate discourse, it is argued that CSR and related concepts are limited to “emancipatory rhetoric…defined by narrow business interests and serve to curtail interests of external stakeholders.” (Banerjee, Crit Sociol (...)
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  33.  11
    Social Justice.A. John Simmons - 1977 - Philosophical Review 86 (4):590.
  34. On the Territorial Rights of States.A. John Simmons - 2001 - Noûs 35 (s1):300-326.
    When officials of some political society portray their state as legitimate - and when do they not! - they intend to be laying claim to a large body of rights, the rights in which their state's legitimacy allegedly consists. The rights claimed are minimally those that states must exercise if they are to retain effective control over their territories and populations in a world composed of numerous autonomous states. Often the rights states are trying to claim in asserting their legitimacy (...)
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  35.  75
    Fundamental non-qualitative properties.Byron Simmons - 2021 - Synthese 198 (7):6183-6206.
    The distinction between qualitative and non-qualitative properties should be familiar from discussions of the principle of the identity of indiscernibles: two otherwise exactly similar individuals, Castor and Pollux, might share all their qualitative properties yet differ with respect to their non-qualitative properties—for while Castor has the property being identical to Castor, Pollux does not. But while this distinction is familiar, there has not been much critical attention devoted to spelling out its precise nature. I argue that the class of non-qualitative (...)
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  36. Philosophical Anarchism.A. John Simmons - 2001 - In Social Science Research Network. Cambridge University Press.
    Anarchist political philosophers normally include in their theories (or implicitly rely upon) a vision of a social life very different than the life experienced by most persons today. Theirs is a vision of autonomous, noncoercive, productive interaction among equals, liberated from and without need for distinctively political institutions, such as formal legal systems or governments or the state. This "positive" part of anarchist theories, this vision of the good social life, will be discussed only indirectly in this essay. Rather, I (...)
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  37.  38
    Impure Concepts and Non-Qualitative Properties.Byron Simmons - 2020 - Synthese 197 (7):3065-3086.
    Some properties such as having a beard and being a philosopher are intuitively qualitative, while other properties such as being identical to Plato and being a student of Socrates are intuitively non-qualitative. It is often assumed that, necessarily, a property is qualitative if and only if it can be designated descriptively without the aid of directly referential devices. I argue that this linguistic thesis fails in both directions: there might be non-qualitative properties that can be designated descriptively, and there appear (...)
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  38. Descartes on the Cognitive Structure of Sensory Experience.Alison Simmons - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (3):549–579.
    Descartes is often thought to bifurcate sensory experience into two distinct cognitive components: the sensing of secondary qualities and the more or less intellectual perceiving of primary qualities. A closer examination of his analysis of sensory perception in the Sixth Replies and his treatment of sensory processing in the Dioptrics and Treatise on Man teIls a different story. I argue that Descartes offers a unified cognitive account of sensory experience according to which the senses and intellect operate together to produce (...)
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  39.  79
    Deflationary Truth and the Liar.Keith Simmons - 1999 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 28 (5):455-488.
  40.  42
    Tangled Up in Views: Beliefs in the Nature of Science and Responses to Socioscientific Dilemmas.Dana L. Zeidler, Kimberly A. Walker, Wayne A. Ackett & Michael L. Simmons - 2002 - Science Education 86 (3):343-367.
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  41. Locke and the Right to Punish.A. John Simmons - 1991 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 20 (4):311-349.
  42.  15
    Better P-Curves: Making P-Curve Analysis More Robust to Errors, Fraud, and Ambitious P-Hacking, a Reply to Ulrich and Miller.Uri Simonsohn, Joseph P. Simmons & Leif D. Nelson - 2015 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 144 (6):1146-1152.
  43.  15
    Universality and the Liar: An Essay on Truth and the Diagonal Argument.Patrick Grim & Keith Simmons - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (3):467.
  44.  10
    On the Edge of Anarchy: Locke, Consent, and the Limits of Society.A. John Simmons - 1995 - Princeton University Press.
    This book completes A. John Simmons's exploration and development of Lockean moral and political philosophy, a project begun in The Lockean Theory of Rights. Here Simmons discusses the Lockean view of the nature of, grounds for, and limits on political relations between persons. Originally published in 1993. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books (...)
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  45.  10
    Political Philosophy.A. John Simmons - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    The most recent addition to the Fundamentals of Philosophy Series, Political Philosophy is a concise yet thorough and highly engaging introduction to the essential problems of the discipline. Organized topically and presented in a straightforward manner by an eminent political philosopher, A. John Simmons, it investigates the nature and basis of political authority and the structure and organization of political life. Each chapter focuses on a central problem, considers how it could be addressed, and outlines the various philosophical positions surrounding (...)
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  46.  33
    The Limits of Obligation.A. John Simmons - 1984 - Philosophical Review 93 (2):300-303.
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  47. Animals, Predators, the Right to Life, and the Duty to Save Lives.Aaron Simmons - 2009 - Ethics and the Environment 14 (1):pp. 15-27.
    One challenge to the idea that animals have a moral right to life claims that any such right would require us to intervene in the wild to prevent animals from being killed by predators. I argue that belief in an animal right to life does not commit us to supporting a program of predator-prey intervention. One common retort to the predator challenge contends that we are not required to save animals from predators because predators are not moral agents. I suggest (...)
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  48. Democratic Authority and the Boundary Problem.A. John Simmons - 2013 - Ratio Juris 26 (3):326-357.
    Theories of political authority divide naturally into those that locate the source of states' authority in the history of states' interactions with their subjects and those that locate it in structural (or functional) features of states (such as the justice of their basic institutions). This paper argues that purely structuralist theories of political authority (such as those defended by Kant, Rawls, and contemporary “democratic Kantians”) must fail because of their inability to solve the boundary problem—namely, the problem of locating the (...)
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  49.  23
    God and the Other: Ethics and Politics After the Theological Turn.J. Aaron Simmons (ed.) - 2011 - Indiana University Press.
    The theological turn in French phenomenology has been of great interest to scholars working in contemporary continental thought, but according to J. Aaron Simmons, not enough has been done to bring these debates into conversation with more mainstream philosophy. Building on the work of Kierkegaard, Levinas, Marion, and Derrida, among others, Simmons suggests how continental philosophy of religion can intersect with political philosophy, environmental philosophy, and theories of knowledge. By productively engaging philosophical "God-talk," Simmons proposes a robust model of postmodern (...)
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  50. The Anarchist Position: A Reply to Klosko and Senor.A. John Simmons - 1987 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 16 (3):269-279.
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