Results for ' Sex in popular culture'

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  1.  39
    Postfemininities in popular culture.Stéphanie Genz - 2009 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Addressing the contradictions surrounding modern-day femininity and its complicated relationship with feminism and postfeminism, this book examines a range of popular female/feminist icons and paradigms. It offers an innovative and forward-looking perspective on femininity and the modern female self.
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  2.  13
    From Possession to Compulsion: Religion, Sex, and Madness in Popular Culture.Peter Gardella - 1986 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 53.
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  3.  12
    Feel-bad postfeminism: impasse, resilience and female subjectivity in popular culture.Catherine McDermott - 2022 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    In Feel-Bad Postfeminism, Catherine McDermott provides crucial insight into what growing up during empowerment postfeminism feels like, and outlines the continuing postfeminist legacy of resilience in girlhood coming-of-age narratives. McDermott's analysis of Gone Girl (2012), Girls (2012-2017) and Appropriate Behaviour (2012) illuminates a major cultural turn in which the pleasures of postfeminist empowerment curdle into a profound sense of rage and resentment. By contrast, close examination of The Hunger Games (2008-2010), Girlhood (2014) and Catch Me Daddy (2014) reveals that contemporary (...)
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  4.  11
    Dystopias in the Realm of Popular Culture: Introducing Elements of Posthuman and Postfeminist Discourse to the Mass Audience Female Readership in Cecelia Ahern’s Roar.Katarzyna Ostalska - 2021 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 11:204-221.
    This article analyzes selected short stories in Cecelia Ahern’s thirty-narrative collection Roar to see how the perspectives of posthuman and postfeminist critique can be incorporated via the common dystopic umbrella into the mainstream female readership of romance literature. The dystopic worlds created by Ahern in Roar portray inequality and power imbalances with regard to gender and sex. The protagonists are mostly middle-aged women whose family and personal lives are either regulated by dystopic realities or acquire a “dystopic” dimension, the solutions (...)
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  5.  16
    Writing Oz pop: An insider’s account of Australian popular culture making and historiography: An interview with Clinton J Walker.Trevor Hogan & Peter Beilharz - 2012 - Thesis Eleven 109 (1):89-114.
    This interview – conducted by Peter Beilharz and Trevor Hogan with Clinton Walker over the course of three months between Melbourne and Sydney via email and Skype – explores the questions of Australian popular culture writing with, against, and of the culture industries themselves. Walker is a leading freelance Australian cultural historian and rock music journalist. He is the author of seven books, five about Australian music. He has been a radio DJ and TV presenter. He compiled (...)
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  6.  14
    The Altars Where We Worship: The Religious Significance of Popular Culture eds. by Juan M. Floyd-Thomas, Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas, and Mark G. Toulouse. [REVIEW]Michael R. Fisher - 2018 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 38 (2):194-196.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:The Altars Where We Worship: The Religious Significance of Popular Culture eds. by Juan M. Floyd-Thomas, Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas, and Mark G. ToulouseMichael R. Fisher Jr.The Altars Where We Worship: The Religious Significance of Popular Culture Juan M. Floyd-Thomas, Stacey M. Floyd-Thomas, and Mark G. Toulouse LOUISVILLE: WESTMINSTER JOHN KNOX PRESS, 2016. 250 pp. $25.00The Altars Where We Worship: The Religious Significance of (...) Culture is notable for interested readers of religion and contemporary popular culture. The authors expand scholarly understandings of religion and the sacred, but [End Page 194] more important, the spaces where they appear in society by providing analysis of the religious nature of six aspects of American culture. These "meaning-making" aspects of popular culture function as "altars of worship." They are the body and sex, big business, entertainment, politics, sports, and science and technology. How religious devotion and worship are manifest in everyday life of Americans is fully examined. This book offers an alternative entry to classical secularization debates that have garnered the attention of religious scholars across fields of study. Resisting polarized battle lines in which secularization debates have positioned the death of religion on one hand, and its resilience in industrialized societies on the other hand, this book considers the idiosyncratic nature of secularization by foregrounding historical, national, and local differences that exist in various contexts.The authors argue that "religion is important to Americans. But the religion we practice is often not the religion we confess" (1, emphasis in the original). According to them, Americans basically believe in a serviceable, friendly "God" who meets their every desire and need. In contemporary American culture, the objects that are deemed to fulfill Americans' desires and passions become their God(s) and thus their religion(s). They support their argument by citing studies by the Pew Research Center on "America's Changing Religious Landscape" and "'Nones' on the Rise," which indicate a decrease in religious affiliation among adults and a notable tension between Americans' professed religious beliefs and their actual religious practices. Given these trends, they contend that Americans discover and produce religious meaning in places outside traditional or conventional sacred spaces. Consequently, they confess, Americans have "laid our fair share, if not our all" (186) on the six altars of American popular culture. Thus, though studies indicate a trending decline in traditional religious affiliations, for the authors, this does not "sound the death knell of religion" (185). Religion, they insist, exists in different shapes and practices.In The Religious Experience of Mankind (1969), the religious historian Ninian Smart offers a seven-dimensional scheme for the interpretation of religion: doctrinal, mythological, ethical, ritual, experiential, institutional, and material. This scheme is adopted in the book as a framing device for interpreting the religious nature of popular culture. The sevenfold scheme is paralleled in each of the six chapters dedicated to a particular altar. Making their case, the authors draw on and weave thinkers from across disciplines and over time as critical interlocutors—from Friedrich Nietzsche, Rudolf Otto, Paul Tillich, and Robert Bella to Cornel West, Audre Lord, and bell hooks, among many others—in examining the religious significance of popular culture.Although a truly engaging and provocative book, The Altars Where We Worship is not without challenges. Some readers may find certain categories of analysis underdeveloped. For example, what makes big business or politics sites of popular culture? This line of inquiry may raise questions for readers about what constitutes popular culture in general. Such challenges, however, do not [End Page 195] detract from the overall accomplishments and contributions this book offers the study of religion in the United States.Michael R. Fisher Jr.Vanderbilt UniversityCopyright © 2018 Society of Christian Ethics... (shrink)
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  7.  9
    The Female Trickster: The Mask That Reveals, Post-Jungian and Postmodern Psychological Perspectives on Women in Contemporary Culture.Ricki Stefanie Tannen - 2007 - Routledge.
    _The Female Trickster_ presents a Post-Jungian postmodern perspective regarding the role of women in contemporary Western society by investigating the re-emergence of female trickster energy in all aspects of popular culture. Ricki Tannen explores the psychological aspects of what happened when women’s imagination was legally and psychologically enclosed millennia ago and demonstrates how the re-emergence of Trickster energy through the female imagination has the radical potential to effect a transformation of western consciousness. Examples are drawn from a diverse (...)
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  8.  5
    “The Limits of the Abject.” The Reception of Le Deuxième Sexe in 1949.Ingrid Galster - 2017 - In Laura Hengehold & Nancy Bauer (eds.), A Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Hoboken: Wiley. pp. 37–46.
    On appearing in 1949, The Second Sex provoked violent controversy in the world of French literary reviews and in the popular press. It was attacked by the religious right wing for daring to speak frankly about female sexuality and by the Communists for taking women's emotional and sexual well‐being as seriously as their economic welfare. Reactions to Beauvoir's text indicate the depth of misogyny at the time of its publication and the ways in which class and educational prestige were (...)
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  9.  16
    When Vulgarism Comes through Popular music: An Investigation of Slackness in Zimdancehall Music.Wonder Maguraushe - 2023 - Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions 12 (1):131-144.
    In Zimbabwe, popular music, particularly the Zimdancehall music genre, has become a cultural site where Shona moral values clash with explicit sexual lyrical content despite a censorship regime in the country. This article examines the nature and cultural consequences of the moral decadence that emerges in popular Zimdancehall song lyrics by several musicians. The article illustrates how vulgar language popularises Zimdancehall songs in unheralded ways that foster identities laced with cultural ambivalences that may portray the artists as both (...)
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  10.  9
    Oh, Wait--Now I Get It: Essays in Popular Philosophy.Peter Heinegg - 2007 - Hamilton Books.
    Like war and politics, philosophy is too important to be left to professionals. Oh Wait_Now I Get It illustrates this basic truth by tackling a broad spectrum of issues, which include: history, religion, government, sex, family, and death. In fact, the entire contemporary cultural scene from the perspective of a thoughtful amateur philosopher is brought forth within this book. Recalling Neitzsche's dictum that all philosophy is also confession, Professor Peter Heinegg begins with some autobiographical pieces on his background, which include (...)
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  11.  7
    Ethics in Popular Culture.June O'Connor - 2004 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 24 (2):3-23.
    ETHICS IS ABUNDANT IN POPULAR CULTURE—IN RADIO TALK SHOWS, television, films, moral advice columns, books and workshops on popular psychology and spirituality, and other venues. This essay explores the ways in which ethics is presented in three select popular settings; the ethical questions addressed in those settings; the moral theories, perspectives, and values that are privileged in opinions offered; and the judgments that are proffered. Of special interest to professional ethicists are the ways in which ethics (...)
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  12.  9
    When We Collide: Sex, Social Risk, and Jewish Ethics by Rebecca J. Epstein-Levi.Joshua Stein - 2024 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 17 (1):99-101.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:When We Collide: Sex, Social Risk, and Jewish Ethics by Rebecca J. Epstein-LeviJoshua Stein (bio)When We Collide: Sex, Social Risk, and Jewish Ethics by Rebecca J. Epstein-Levi. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2023Sex is messy:Ethicists have an unfortunate habit of speaking of sex—or "good" sex, anyway—in lofty, aspirational terms: the physical and spiritual union of committed partners, the human sharing in divine creativity, the two becoming one, and so (...)
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  13.  13
    Lying in early modern English culture: from the Oath of Supremacy to the Oath of Allegiance.Andrew Hadfield - 2017 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    Lying in Early Modern English Culture is a major study of ideas of truth and falsehood in early modern England from the advent of the Reformation to the aftermath of the failed Gunpowder Plot. The period is characterised by panic and chaos when few had any idea how religious, cultural, and social life would develop after the traumatic division of Christendom. While many saw the need for a secular power to define the truth others declared that their allegiances belonged (...)
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  14.  3
    When We Collide: Sex, Social Risk, and Jewish Ethics by Rebecca J. Epstein-Levi (review).Joshua Stein - 2024 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 17 (1):99-101.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:When We Collide: Sex, Social Risk, and Jewish Ethics by Rebecca J. Epstein-LeviJoshua Stein (bio)When We Collide: Sex, Social Risk, and Jewish Ethics by Rebecca J. Epstein-Levi. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2023Sex is messy:Ethicists have an unfortunate habit of speaking of sex—or "good" sex, anyway—in lofty, aspirational terms: the physical and spiritual union of committed partners, the human sharing in divine creativity, the two becoming one, and so (...)
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  15. Zombie Sex.Steve Jones & Shaka McGlotten - 2014 - In Steve Jones & Shaka McGlotten (eds.), Zombies and Sexuality: Essays on Desire and the Living Dead. McFarland. pp. 1-18.
    Since the early 2000s, zombies have become an increasingly significant presence in popular culture. Zombies are social monsters, epitomizing aspects of social horror. What is at once central and yet strangely absent from current debates about zombies is any detailed consideration of sex and sexuality. This oversight is startling, not least since sex is arguably the most intimate form of social engagement, and is a profound aspect of human social identity. What makes the omission even more remarkable is (...)
     
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  16. Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications.John Danaher & Neil McArthur - 2017 - MIT Press.
    Sexbots are coming. Given the pace of technological advances, it is inevitable that realistic robots specifically designed for people's sexual gratification will be developed in the not-too-distant future. Despite popular culture's fascination with the topic, and the emergence of the much-publicized Campaign Against Sex Robots, there has been little academic research on the social, philosophical, moral, and legal implications of robot sex. This book fills the gap, offering perspectives from philosophy, psychology, religious studies, economics, and law on the (...)
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  17.  20
    Social Theory in Popular Culture.Lee Barron - 2013 - Basingstoke: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Social theory can sometimes seem as though it's speaking of a world that existed long ago, so why should we continue to study and discuss the theories of these dead white men? Can their work still inform us about the way we live today? Are they still relevant to our consumer-focused, celebrity-crazy, tattoo-friendly world? This book explains how the ideas of classical sociological theory can be understood, and applied to, everyday activities like listening to hip-hop, reading fashion magazines or watching (...)
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  18.  25
    “The Proof Is in the Pudding”: How Mental Health Practitioners View the Power of “Sex Hormones” in the Process of Transition.Jaye Cee Whitehead, Kath Bassett, Leia Franchini & Michael Iacolucci - 2015 - Feminist Studies 41 (3):623-650.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Feminist Studies 41, no. 3. © 2015 by Feminist Studies, Inc. 623 Jaye Cee Whitehead, Kath Bassett, Leia Franchini, and Michael Iacolucci “The Proof Is in the Pudding”: How Mental Health Practitioners View the Power of “Sex Hormones” in the Process of Transition In the United States today, popular discourse touts the power of “sex hormones” and hormone receptors in the brain to chemically produce gender expressions (manifested (...)
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  19.  37
    Alchemy in Popular Culture: Leonardo Fioravanti and the Search for the Philosopher's Stone.William Eamon - 2000 - Early Science and Medicine 5 (2):196-212.
    This article examines the alchemical ideas and practices of the sixteenth-century Italian surgeon Leonardo Fioravanti.
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  20.  65
    The placebo effect in popular culture.Mary Faith Marshall - 2004 - Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (1):37-42.
    This paper gives an overview of the placebo effect in popular culture, especially as it pertains to the work of authors Patrick O’Brian and Sinclair Lewis. The beloved physician as placebo, and the clinician scientist as villain are themes that respectively inform the novels, The Hundred Days and Arrowsmith. Excerpts from the novels, and from film show how the placebo effect, and the randomized clinical trial, have emerged into popular culture, and evolved over time.
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  21.  2
    The Untermensch in Popular Culture.Henry Winthrop - 1974 - The Journal of Aesthetic Education 8 (1):107.
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  22.  18
    Apocalypse and heroism in popular culture: allegories of white masculinity in crisis.Katherine Sugg - 2022 - Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers.
    Over the past two decades, stories of world-ending catastrophe have featured prominently in film and television. Zombie apocalypses, climate disasters, alien invasions, global pandemics and dystopian world orders fill our screens-typically with a singular figure or tenacious group tasked with saving or salvaging the world. Why are stories of End Times crisis so popular with audiences? And why is the hero so often a white man who overcomes personal struggles and incredible obstacles to lead humanity toward a restored future? (...)
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  23.  68
    Shows About Nothing: Nihilism in Popular Culture.Thomas S. Hibbs - 2011 - Baylor University Press.
    Nihilism, American style -- The quest for evil -- The negative zone : suburban familial malaise in American beauty, Revolutionary road, and Mad men -- Normal nihilism as comic : Seinfeld, Trainspotting, and Pulp fiction -- Romanticism and nihilism -- Defense against the dark arts : from Se7en to the Dark knight and Harry Potter -- God got involved : sacred quests and overcoming nihilism -- Feels like the movies.
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  24.  11
    Lies that go unchallenged in popular culture.Charles W. Colson - 2005 - Wheaton, Ill.: Tyndale House Publishers. Edited by James S. Bell.
    Using Biblical quotes and his own personal beliefs, the author presents analysis and a critique on some of the contemporary viewpoints presented to the public by the popular media, educational leaders, scientists, and politicians.
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  25.  11
    Sex and the failed absolute.Slavoj Žižek - 2019 - New York City: Bloomsbury Academic.
    In the most rigorous articulation of his philosophical system to date, Slavoj Žižek provides nothing short of a new definition of dialectical materialism. In forging this new materialism, Žižek critiques and challenges not only the work of Alain Badiou, Robert Brandom, Joan Copjec, Quentin Meillassoux, and Julia Kristeva (to name but a few), but everything from popular science and quantum mechanics to sexual difference and analytic philosophy. Alongside striking images of the Möbius strip, the cross-cap, and the Klein bottle, (...)
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  26. Evaluating Arguments for the Sex/Gender Distinction.Tomas Bogardus - 2020 - Philosophia 48 (3):873-892.
    Many philosophers believe that our ordinary English words man and woman are “gender terms,” and gender is distinct from biological sex. That is, they believe womanhood and manhood are not defined even partly by biological sex. This sex/gender distinction is one of the most influential ideas of the twentieth century on the broader culture, both popular and academic. Less well known are the reasons to think it’s true. My interest in this paper is to show that, upon investigation, (...)
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  27. What a girl wants?: fantasizing the reclamation of self in postfeminism.Diane Negra - 2009 - New York: Routledge.
    From domestic goddess to desperate housewife, this book explores the importance and centrality of postfeminism in contemporary popular culture.
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  28.  13
    ""Constructing identities, mediating desires III desire" to have" and desire" to be": The influence of representations of the idealized masculine body on the subject and the object in male same-sex attraction.Robert Pralat - 2010 - Dialogue and Universalism 20 (5-6):101-117.
    In this essay, I attempt to consider a difficult issue: the triangular relationship between the subject, the object and the visual representations of masculinity in the context of male homosexual desire. I outline contemporary circumstances of society’s interaction with popular culture in which gay men form two images of an idealized masculine body: a concept of their own body and a concept of the body they feel sexually attracted to. My concern is to theorize these two kinds of (...)
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  29.  31
    Rome in popular culture S. R. joshel, M. malamud, D. T. McGuire (edd.): Imperial projections. Ancient Rome in modern popular culture . Pp. VIII + 299, ills. Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins university press, 2002. Cased, £31. Isbn: 0-8018-6742-. [REVIEW]Parshia Lee-Stecum - 2004 - The Classical Review 54 (01):234-.
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  30.  33
    Desire “to Have” and Desire “to Be”: the Influence of Representations of the Idealized Masculine Body on the Subject and the Object in Male Same-Sex Attraction.Robert Pralat - 2010 - Dialogue and Universalism 20 (5-6):101-117.
    In this essay, I attempt to consider a difficult issue: the triangular relationship between the subject, the object and the visual representations of masculinity in the context of male homosexual desire. I outline contemporary circumstances of society’s interaction with popular culture in which gay men form two images of an idealized masculine body: a concept of their own body and a concept of the body they feel sexually attracted to. My concern is to theorize these two kinds of (...)
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  31. Sex, love and somaesthetics Some reflections on the new book by Richard Schusterman. [REVIEW]Prasasti Pandit - 2021 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 11 (1):279–286.
    Richard Schusterman’s book, Ars erotica: sex and somaesthetics in the classical arts of love (Schusterman, 2021) is a path-finding, innovative contribution that breaks the silence around the long-held body-shying academic deprivation to erotic ideas with its free-flowing comprehensive discussion on carnal desire and erotic thoughts. Schusterman provides a panoramic yet vibrantly profound analysis of the aesthetic inclusion into erotic love following the culture of Asian and Western thoughts from the ancient era to the Renaissance. The book’s scope shows the (...)
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  32.  6
    Shows about nothing: nihilism in popular culture from the Exorcist to Seinfeld.Thomas S. Hibbs - 1999 - Dallas: Spence.
  33.  16
    Environmentalism in Popular Culture[REVIEW]Wendy Lynne Lee - 2010 - Environmental Ethics 32 (3):327-330.
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  34. A sociology of sex and sexuality.Gail Hawkes - 1996 - Philadelphia: Open University Press.
    A Sociology of Sex and Sexuality offers an historical sociological analysis of ideas about expressions of sexual desire, combining both primary and secondary historical and theoretical material with original research and popular imagery in the contemporary context. While some reference is made to the sexual ideology of Classical Antiquity and of early Christianity, the major focus of the book is on the development of ideas about sex and sexuality in the context of modernity. It questions the widespread assumption that (...)
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  35. Representing women in popular culture.Imelda Whelehan - 2014 - In Mary Evans, Clare Hemmings, Marsha Henry, Hazel Johnstone, Sumi Madhok, Ania Plomien & Sadie Wearing (eds.), The SAGE handbook of feminist theory. Thousand Oaks, California: SAGE reference.
     
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  36.  31
    Nursing under the skin: a netnographic study of metaphors and meanings in nursing tattoos.Henrik Eriksson, Mats Christiansen, Jessica Holmgren, Annica Engström & Martin Salzmann-Erikson - 2014 - Nursing Inquiry 21 (4):318-326.
    The aims of this study were to present themes in nursing motifs as depicted in tattoos and to describe how it reflects upon nursing in popular culture as well as within professional nursing culture. An archival and cross‐sectional observational study was conducted online to search for images of nursing tattoos that were freely available, by utilizing the netnographic methodology. The 400 images were analyzed in a process that consisted of four analytical steps focusing on metaphors and meanings (...)
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  37. Sex and Horror.Steve Jones - 2017 - In Feona Attwood, Brian McNair & Clarissa Smith (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Media, Sex and Sexuality. Routledge. pp. 290-299.
    The combination of sex and horror may be disquieting to many, but the two are natural (if perhaps gruesome) bedfellows. In fact, sex and horror coincide with such regularity in contemporary horror fiction that the two concepts appear to be at least partially intertwined. The sex–horror relationship is sometimes connotative rather than overt; examples of this relationship range from the seduction overtones of 'Nosferatu' and the juxtaposition of nudity and horror promised by European exploitation filmmakers to the sadomasochistic iconography of (...)
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  38.  63
    Shopping Malls, Consumer Culture and the Reshaping of Public Space in Egypt.Mona Abaza - 2001 - Theory, Culture and Society 18 (5):97-122.
    Egypt witnessed in the last decade, as in many Southeast Asian mega-cities, the reshaping of public space through the creation of new shopping malls and recreation places. This went hand in hand with the `gentrification' of certain areas of the city of Cairo, which is continuing at the expense of pushing away the poor. The 1980s and 1990s also witnessed increasing prosperity among certain classes and the appropriation of new consumer lifestyles. This article attempts to look at the variations of (...)
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  39.  9
    The Untermensch in Popular Culture.Henry Winthrop - 1974 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 8 (1):107.
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  40.  47
    Family Values: Subjects Between Nature and Culture.Kelly Oliver - 1997 - Routledge.
    Family Values shows how the various contradictions at the heart of Western conceptions of maternity and paternity problematize our relationships with ourselves and with others. Using philosophical texts, psychoanalytic theory, studies in biology and popular culture, Kelly Oliver challenges our traditional concepts of maternity which are associated with nature, and our conceptions of paternity which are embedded in culture. Oliver's intervention calls into question the traditional image of the oppositional relationship between nature and culture, maternal and (...)
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  41.  8
    Debating Gender in Early Modern England, 1500–1700.C. Malcolmson & M. Suzuki - 2002 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This book explores the construction of gender ideology in early modern England through an analysis of the querelle des femmes - the debate about the relationship between the sexes that originated on the continent during the middle ages and the Renaissance and developed in England into the Swetnam controversy, which revolved around the publication of Joseph Swetnam's The arraignment of lewd, forward, and inconstant women and the pamphlets which responded to its misogynist attacks. The volume contextualizes the debate in terms (...)
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  42.  6
    Strategic reinvention in popular culture: the encore impulse.Richard Pfefferman - 2013 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
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  43. Single Women in Popular Culture.[author unknown] - 2012
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  44.  45
    Popular culture in (and out of) American political science.Nick Dorzweiler - 2017 - History of the Human Sciences 30 (1):138-159.
    Historically, American political science has rarely engaged popular culture as a central topic of study, despite the domain’s outsized influence in American community life. This article argues that this marginalization is, in part, the by-product of long-standing disciplinary debates over the inadequate political development of the American public. To develop this argument, the article first surveys the work of early political scientists, such as John Burgess and Woodrow Wilson, to show that their reformist ambitions largely precluded discussion of (...)
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  45.  28
    Popular Culture in the Houses of Poe and Cortázar.Daniel Bautista - 2010 - Intertexts 14 (1):1-20.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Popular Culture in the Houses of Poe and CortázarDaniel Bautista (bio)"[…]at the age of nine I read Edgar Allan Poe for the first time. That book I stole to read because my mother didn't want me to read it, she thought I was too young and she was right. The book scared me and I was ill for three months, because I believed in it."…—Julio Cortázar1In interviews (...)
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  46.  31
    The media in question: popular cultures and public interests.Kees Brants, Joke Hermes & Liesbet van Zoonen (eds.) - 1998 - Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications.
    Media in Question sets the agenda for a revitalized debate on the hybrid communicative practices that constitute the postmodern media landscape: practices that cross the boundaries between fact and fiction, information and entertainment, public knowledge, and popular culture. In this challenging and provocative collection, the individual contributors rethink key issuesùthe meaning of the public interest, the quality of media performance, and deregulation. In the process they raise questions rarely addressed in normative media theories, for example, the ethics of (...)
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  47.  24
    Popular Culture and the Dilemma of Corruption in Nigeria.Adekunle A. Ibrahim & Samuel Otu Ishaya - 2018 - Human and Social Studies 7 (3):47-65.
    This paper examines the nexus between popular culture and the problem of corruption in Nigeria within the theoretical framework of the Socratic dictum that “the unexamined life is not worth living”. The paper argues that corruption is a social behavior that is propelled by popular culture and sustained by skewed application of logical thinking in critical decision making. Hence, the paper posits that formal education remains the bedrock upon which corruption can be curtailed and also equips (...)
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  48.  7
    The Overman in the Marketplace: Nietzschean Heroism in Popular Culture.Ishay Landa - 2007 - Lexington Books.
    This book explores the emergence and significance of 'a Nietzschean heroic model' in 20th-century popular culture, some notable examples of which are James Bond, Tarzan, and Hannibal Lecter.
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  49.  15
    Popular Cultural Pedagogy, in Theory; Or: What can cultural theory learn about learning from popular culture?☆.Paul Bowman - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (6):601-609.
    Central to politicized academic projects such as cultural studies and politicized work in cultural theory and philosophy is a critique of the cultural power of institutions—pedagogical institutions...
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  50. Popular Culture and Lettered Culture in Ancient Vietnam.Lê Thành Khôi - 1986 - Diogenes 34 (133):122-143.
    In all societies that have arrived at a certain degree of social differentiation, there are two types of culture that may be qualified respectively as “popular” and “lettered”. Popular culture is that of the people as opposed to the dominant political and intellectual classes. The latter two may be distinct (but allied), as in ancient India with the pair Brahman-kshatriva. or mixed as in Confucian China with the bureaucracy of scholars-civil servants. The duality between the two (...)
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