Results for 'Praj��akaragupta'

7 found
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  1.  25
    Bh?Vaviveka's Praj�?Prad?Pa.William L. Ames - 1994 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 22 (2):93-135.
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  2.  5
    The Gurudharmas in Taiwanese Buddhist Nunneries.Ann Heirman & Tzu-Lung Chiu - 2013 - Buddhist Studies Review 29 (2):273-300.
    According to tradition, Mah?praj?pat?, the Buddha’s aunt and stepmother, when allowed to join the Buddhist monastic community, accepted eight ‘fundamental rules’ that made the nuns’ order dependent upon the monks’ order. This story has given rise to much debate, in the past as well as in the present. This article first shows how the eight rules became an integrated part of the vinaya, and more particularly of the Dharmaguptakavinaya, that forms the basis of monastic ordinations in East Asia. Against the (...)
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  3.  15
    Delivering the Last Blade of Grass: Aspects of the Bodhisattva Ideal in the Mahāyāna.Harry Oldmeadow - 1997 - Asian Philosophy 7 (3):181 – 194.
    The ideal of the bodhisattva was crucial in the development of the Mah y na branch of the Buddhist tradition. It provided a meeting ground for cardinal Mah y nist doctrines concerning praj, karun and ś nvat, as well as introducing into Buddhism more overtly religious elements which help to account for its popular appeal in those areas where the Mah y na took hold. The vow of the bodhisattva to forego entry into nirv na until all beings “down to (...)
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  4.  33
    The Theory of Meaning in Buddhist Logicians: The Historical and Intellectual Context of Apoha. [REVIEW]R. K. Payne - 1987 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 15 (3):261-284.
    These supporting concepts enable us to much more adequately understand the meaning of apoha. First, a sharp distinction is drawn between the real and the conceptual; the real is particular, unique, momentary and the basis of perception, while the conceptual is universal, general, only supposedly objective and the basis of language. Second, the complex nature of negation discloses the kind of negation meant by apoha. Negation by implication is seen as disclosing the necessary relation between simple affirmations and simple negations. (...)
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  5.  5
    The Gurudharmas in Buddhist Nunneries of Mainland China.Tzu-Lung Chiu & Ann Heirman - 2015 - Buddhist Studies Review 31 (2):241-272.
    According to tradition, when the Buddha’s aunt and stepmother Mah?praj?pat? was allowed to join the Buddhist monastic community, she accepted eight ‘fundamental rules’ that made the nuns’ order dependent upon the monks’ order. This story has given rise to much debate, in the past as well as in the present, and this is no less the case in Mainland China, where nunneries have started to re-emerge in recent decades. This article first presents new insight into Mainland Chinese monastic practitioners’ common (...)
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  6.  7
    Fifth Century Chinese Nuns: An Exemplary Case.Ann Heirman - 2010 - Buddhist Studies Review 27 (1):61-76.
    According to tradition, the first Buddhist nun, Mah?praj?pat?, accepted eight fundamental rules as a condition for her ordination. One of these rules says that a full ordination ceremony, for a nun, must be carried out in both orders: first in the nuns’ order, and then in the monks’ order. Both orders need to be represented by a quorum of legal witnesses. It implies that in the absence of such a quorum, an ordination cannot be legally held, in vinaya terms. This (...)
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  7.  11
    The Way of the Lotus: Critical Reflections on the Ethics of the Saddharmapundarika S Tra.A. L. Herman - 1997 - Asian Philosophy 7 (1):5 – 22.
    Edward Conze once observed of the thirty-eight books constituting the Praj p ramit S tras that their central message could be summed up in two sentences: (1) One should become a Bodhisattva (or Buddha-to-be), i.e. one who is content with nothing less than all-knowledge attained through the perfection of wisdom for the sake of all beings. (2) There is no such thing as a Bodhisattva or as all-knowledge or as a being or as the perfection of wisdom or as an (...)
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