Results for ' Mythology, Maori'

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  1. Maori philosophy: indigenous thinking from Aotearoa.Georgina Stewart - 2020 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    This book is a concise introduction to Maori philosophy, covering the symbolic systems and worldviews of the indigenous people of Aotearoa, New Zealand. This book addresses core philosophical issues including Maori notions of the self, the world, epistemology, the form in which Maori philosophy is conveyed, and whether or not Maori philosophy has a teleological agenda. The book introduces key texts, thinkers and themes and includes pedagogical features including: - A Maori-to-English glossary; - Accessible English (...)
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  2. Exploring Maori Values.John Patterson - 1994 - Philosophy East and West 44 (1):183-186.
  3. Maori environmental virtues.John Patterson - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (4):397-409.
    The standard sources for Maori ethics are the traditional narratives. These depict all things in the environment as sharing a common ancestry, and as thereby required, ideally, to exhibit certain virtues of respect and responsibility for each other. These environmental virtues are expressed in terms of distinctively Maori concepts: respect for mauri and tapu, kaitiakitanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, and environmental balance. I briefly explore these Maori environmental virtues, and draw from them some messages for the world at large.
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  4.  28
    Māori in the Kingdom of the Gaze: Subjects or critics?Carl Mika & Georgina Stewart - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (3).
    For Māori, a real opportunity exists to flesh out some terms and concepts that Western thinkers have adopted and that precede disciplines but necessarily inform them. In this article, we are intent on describing one of these precursory phenomena—Foucault’s Gaze—within a framework that accords with a Māori philosophical framework. Our discussion is focused on the potential and limits of colonised thinking, which has huge implications for such disciplines as education, among others. We have placed Foucault’s Gaze alongside a Māori metaphysics (...)
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  5. Māori concepts of learning and knowledge.Brian Findsen & Lavinia Tamarua - 2007 - In Sharan B. Merriam (ed.), Non-Western Perspectives on Learning and Knowing. Krieger Pub. Co..
     
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  6.  11
    Maori Environmental Virtues.John Patterson - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (4):397-409.
    The standard sources for Maori ethics are the traditional narratives. These depict all things in the environment as sharing a common ancestry, and as thereby required, ideally, to exhibit certain virtues of respect and responsibility for each other. These environmental virtues are expressed in terms of distinctively Maori concepts: respect for mauri and tapu, kaitiakitanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, and environmental balance. I briefly explore these Maori environmental virtues, and draw from them some messages for the world at large.
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  7.  17
    Maori Wellbeing and Being-in-the-World: Challenging Notions for Psychological Research and Practice in New Zealand.Gabriel Rossouw - 2008 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 8 (2):1-11.
    Psychological research and practice in New Zealand has a long history of a positivist inspired epistemology and a pragmatic evidence-based approach to therapeutic treatment. There is a growing realization that a more meaningful interface between research and practice is required to accommodate indigenous Maori knowledge of wellbeing and living. The dominant Western psychological view in New Zealand of world, time, illness and wellbeing results in practices that do not make sense in cultural terms. The medicalisation and classification of psychological (...)
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  8.  17
    Mäori in the science curriculum: Developments and possibilities.Georgina Stewart - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (6):851–870.
    The aim of this paper is to examine the current state of development of Mäori science curriculum policy, and the roles that various discourses have played in shaping these developments. These discussions provide a background for suggestions about a possible future direction, and the presentation of a new concept for Mäori science education.
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  9.  87
    Mythology, Madness, and Laughter: Subjectivity in German Idealism.Markus Gabriel - 2009 - Continuum.
    A hugely important book that rediscovers three crucial, but long overlooked themes in German idealism: mythology, madness and laughter.
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  10. Exile, Maori and lesbian.Michelle Erai - 2004 - In Lynne Alice & Lynne Star (eds.), Queer in Aotearoa New Zealand. Dunmore Press. pp. 35--46.
     
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  11. Dossier Aldo Capitini: sorvegliato speciale dalla polizia.Andrea Maori & Giuseppe Moscati (eds.) - 2014 - [Viterbo]: Stampa alternativa/Nuovi equilibri.
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  12.  99
    White Mythologies: Writing History and the West.Robert Young - 2004 - Routledge.
    In the first edition of White Mythologies (1990) Robert Young challenged the status of history, asking whether in this postmodern era we should consider it a Western myth, with an uncertain status. Is it, he asked, possible to write history that avoids the trap of Eurocentrism? Investigating the history of History, from Hegel to Foucault, White Mythologies calls into question traditional accounts of a single 'World History' which leaves aside the 'Third World' as surplus to the narrative of the West. (...)
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  13. A Mäori concept of collective responsibility.John Patterson - 1992 - In Graham Oddie & Roy W. Perrett (eds.), Justice, Ethics, and New Zealand Society. Oxford University Press. pp. 11--26.
     
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  14.  8
    A Maori il-logical ethics of the dark: An example with ‘trauma’.Carl Mika - 2021 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (5):426-435.
    Where has all the hilarity gone – and, with it, the ethics of the dark? In this article, I engage with our metaphysical entities of darkness and nothingness. Undermining and re-declaring are more than just pleasurable exercise for my own indigenous group – Maori; they are ethical necessities that keep one’s certainties in check. Whether it is agreeable or uncomfortable, this acknowledgement of those first beings is necessary if we are to avoid taking ourselves too seriously. I then consider (...)
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  15.  9
    The maori—A problem in social assimilation.W. S. Dale - 1931 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 9 (3):203-213.
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  16.  15
    The maori—a problem in social assimilation.W. S. Dale - 1931 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):203 – 213.
  17.  14
    The Mythological Unconscious.Michael Vannoy Adams - 2001 - Spring Publications.
    Preface to the second edition -- Preface to the first edition -- Psycho-mythology : meschugge? -- Dreams and fantasies : manifestations 0f the mythological unconscious -- African-American dreaming and the "lion in the path" : racism and the cultural unconscious -- "Hapless" the Centaur : an archetypal image, amplification, and active imagination -- Pegasus and visionary experience : from the white winged horse to the "flying red horse" -- The bull, the labyrinth, and the Minotaur : from archaeology to "archetypology" (...)
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  18. Mana Mäori motuhake: Challenges to 'käwanatanga'1840-1940.Lachy Paterson - forthcoming - Ki Te Whaiao: An Introduction to Mäori Culture and Society. Edited by Tänia Ka’Ai Et. Al. Auckland: Pearson Education.
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  19.  8
    The Mythology of Transgression: Homosexuality as Metaphor.Jamake Highwater - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Jamake Highwater is a master storyteller and one of our most visionary writers, hailed as "an eloquent bard, whose words are fire and glory" (Studs Terkel) and "a writer of exceptional vision and power" (Ana"is Nin). Author of more than thirty volumes of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry, Highwater--considered by many to be the intellectual heir of Joseph Campbell--has long been intrigued by how our mythological legacies have served as a foundation of modern civilization. Now, in The Mythology of Transgression, he (...)
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  20.  40
    Mythologies.Roland Barthes & Annette Lavers - 1973 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 31 (4):563-564.
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  21. Mythologies of Tribal Art.Denis Dutton - unknown
    Forty years ago Roland Barthes defined a mythology as those “falsely obvious” ideas which an age so takes for granted that it is unaware of its own belief. An illustration of what he meant can be seen in his 1957 critique of the photographic exhibition, The Family of Man . Barthes declares that the myth it promotes stresses exoticism, complacently projecting a Babel of human diversity over the globe. From this image of diversity a pluralistic humanism “is magically produced: man (...)
     
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  22.  15
    Kaupapa Māori, Philosophy and Schools.Georgina Stewart - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (11):1-6.
    Goals for adding philosophy to the school curriculum centre on the perceived need to improve the general quality of critical thinking found in society. School philosophy also provides a means for asking questions of value and purpose about curriculum content across and between subjects, and, furthermore, it affirms the capability of children to think philosophically. Two main routes suggested are the introduction of philosophy as a subject, and processes of facilitating philosophical discussions as a way of establishing classroom ‘communities of (...)
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  23.  5
    Negative Mythology.Shane Chalmers - 2020 - Law and Critique 31 (1):59-72.
    Can mythology be a form of critical theory in the service of right? From the standpoint of an Enlightenment tradition, the answer is no. Mythology is characterised by irrationality, and works to mystify reality, whilst critical theory is set against the irrational, its entire force directed at demystifying reality. In a post-Enlightenment tradition, reason, including critical reason, may take mythological form—indeed, there is identity as much as non-identity between the two forms, a mimetic relationship in which the rational cannot be (...)
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  24. The mythological being of reflection : An essay on Hegel, Schelling, and the contingency of necessity.Markus Gabriel - 2009 - In Mythology, Madness, and Laughter: Subjectivity in German Idealism. Continuum.
  25.  19
    Classical Mythology in Context.Lisa Maurizio - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Classical Mythology in Context encourages students to directly encounter and explore ancient myths and to understand them in broader interpretative contexts. Featuring a modular structure that coincides with the four main components of a classical mythology course--history, theory, comparison, and reception--each chapter is built around one central figure or topic. Classical Mythology in Context provides: A sustained discussion of religious practices and sacred places that offers a key approach to the historical contextualization of Greek myths An introduction to--and integration of--theoretical (...)
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  26.  21
    Creative Mythology. [REVIEW]T. J. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 22 (3):565-565.
    This is the fourth and final volume in Campbell's history of world mythology entitled, The Masks of God. It takes for its narrative the disintegration of the tradition from the middle of the twelfth century to the present-day, ending with a discussion of Mann and Joyce. Although sometimes stunning in insight, in an overall way it is less illuminating than the earlier three volumes. In his earlier works on primitive, oriental, and occidental mythological traditions he was dealing with complete and (...)
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  27.  8
    A Maori il-logical ethics of the dark: An example with ‘trauma’.Carl Mika - forthcoming - Tandf: Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-10.
  28. Mythology of the Given.Ernest Sosa - 1997 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 14 (3):275 - 286.
  29. Mythology of the Factive.John Turri - 2011 - Logos and Episteme 2 (1):141-150.
    It’s a cornerstone of epistemology that knowledge requires truth – that is, that knowledge is factive. Allan Hazlett boldly challenges orthodoxy by arguing thatthe ordinary concept of knowledge is not factive. On this basis Hazlett further argues that epistemologists shouldn’t concern themselves with the ordinary concept of knowledge, or knowledge ascriptions and related linguistic phenomena. I argue that either Hazlett is wrong about the ordinary concept of knowledge, or he’s right in a way that leaves epistemologists to carry on exactly (...)
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  30.  47
    Christmas Mythologies: Sacred and Secular.Guy Bennett-Hunter - 2010 - In Scott C. Lowe (ed.), Christmas: Philosophy For Everyone. Wiley-Blackwell.
    On the 24th and 25th of December every year two very different stories are told: one in people’s homes, by the fireplace or Christmas tree, to pyjamaed but excited and sleepless children; the other to people of all ages in the more imposing setting of candlelit churches and cathedrals. I want to ask, in this essay: Does the telling of these two stories have anything in common? What can we learn by comparing them? The first one, the one I call (...)
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  31.  6
    Rewriting Mythology: Tautegory, Ontology, and the Novel.Deborah Casewell - 2022 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (1):119-141.
    In Schelling’s Lectures on the Philosophy of Art, he outlines an aesthetic theory of the novel and how it communicates truth, based around his Identitätssystem. In doing so, he understands truth as symbolic, where the symbolic is tautegorical. In his later lectures on mythology he instantiates a new understanding of ontology and mythology as tautegorical, and makes gestures towards how to understand aesthetic forms based on these new accounts. This paper explores how that new aesthetic understanding of truth, ontology, and (...)
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  32. Socrates’ Mythological Role in Plato’s Theaetetus.Yip-Mei Loh - 2017 - International Journal of Humanities and Social Science 11 (2):343-346.
    Plato, as a poet, employs muthos extensively to express his philosophical dialectical development, so the majority of his dialogues are comprised of muthoi. We cannot separate his muthos from his philosophical thought, since the former has great influence in the latter. So the methodology of this paper is first to discuss the dialogue "Theaetetus" to find out why he compares Socrates to the Greek goddess Artemis; then his concept of Maieutikē will be investigated. At the beginning of Plato’s "Theaetetus", Socrates (...)
     
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  33.  17
    The Mythological State and its Empire.David Grant - 2008 - Routledge.
    Probing the work of key political thinkers from Hobbes to Rawls, this book examines the state as a real, mythological entity. This groundbreaking work explores the contradictions of our views towards, and interactions with the state and will be of interest to scholars of sociology, politics, philosophy and law.
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  34. The Mythological State and its Empire.David Grant - 2008 - Routledge.
    We see the modern State as the most rational form of governing yet devised, and one which properly recognises our inherent individual rights. However, as the histories of colonialism and imprisonment reveal, it is also an intruder into the lives of generally unwilling individuals, constraining rights. This book looks beneath the contradiction to see an entity willingly sustained by all individuals and for which we forgo our responsibility to and for ourselves. We place ourselves in the hands of those interests (...)
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  35.  52
    Mythological content: A problem for Milikan's teleosemantics.Tadeusz W. Zawidzki - 2003 - Philosophical Psychology 16 (4):535-538.
    I pose the following dilemma for Millikan's teleological theory of mental content. There is only one way that her theory can avoid Gauker's [(1995) Review of Millikan's White queen psychology and other essays for Alice, Philosophical Psychology, 8, 305-309] charge that it relies on an unexplained notion of mapping or isomorphism between mental state and world. Mental content must be explained in terms of the mapping relation that is required for mental state producing and consuming mechanisms to perform their biologically (...)
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  36. Mythology and theology. Second article.V. M. Naydysh - 2019 - RUDN Journal of Philosophy 23 (2):210-221.
    The concept of interpretation is applicable to any forms of knowledge, including systems of religious knowledge, designing the ideal model of the subject of religious veneration. The author analyzes the epistemological features of theology as a form of spiritual culture, its formation in ancient culture. It is shown that the epistemological basis for overcoming mythological consciousness was the decentralization of thinking, i.e. development of the ability of consciousness in the construction of the image, the picture of the world to correct (...)
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  37.  42
    Mythological Paradeigma in the Iliad.M. M. Willcock - 1964 - Classical Quarterly 14 (02):141-.
    AN inquiry into the use of paradeigma in the Iliad must begin with Niobe. At 24. 602 Achilles introduces Niobe in order to encourage Priam to have some food. The dead body of the best of Priam's sons has now been placed on the wagon ready for its journey back to Troy. Achilles says , ‘Now let us eat. For even Niobe ate food, and she had lost twelve children. Apollo and Artemis killed them all; they lay nine days in (...)
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  38. Creative Mythology.J. CAMPBELL - 1968
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  39. Instrumental mythology.Mark Schroeder - 2005 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 1 (2):1-13.
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  40.  11
    Maori Culture and Modern Ethnology.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):186.
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  41.  9
    Maori culture and modern ethnology: A preliminary survey, II.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 5 (3):186-201.
  42.  2
    Academic-Māori-Woman: The impossible may take a little longer.Georgina Tuari Stewart - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-6.
  43.  6
    Maori Culture and Modern Ethnology.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):81.
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  44.  12
    Maori culture and modern ethnology: A preliminary survey, I.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):81 – 93.
  45.  12
    Mythological Paradeigma in the Iliad.M. M. Willcock - 1964 - Classical Quarterly 14 (2):141-154.
    AN inquiry into the use of paradeigma in theIliadmust begin with Niobe. At 24. 602 Achilles introduces Niobe in order to encourage Priam to have some food. The dead body of the best of Priam's sons has now been placed on the wagon ready for its journey back to Troy. Achilles says, ‘Now let us eat. For even Niobe ate food, and she had losttwelvechildren. Apollo and Artemis killed them all; they lay nine days in their blood and there was (...)
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  46.  8
    Mythology, Weltanschauung, symbolic universe and states of consciousness.Gert Malan - 2016 - HTS Theological Studies 72 (1).
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  47.  4
    Maori culture and modern ethnology: A preliminary survey, I.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 5 (2):81-93.
  48.  1
    African Mythology, Femininity, and Maternity.Ismahan Soukeyna Diop - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    This book explores feminine archetypes and mythological figures in African and European traditions with an underlying goal of describing the foundations of social status for women. The author provides a rich corpus of mythology and tales to illustrate aspects of female and mother-daughter relationships. Diop analyzes the symbolic aspects of maternity and femininity, describing the social meaning of the matrix, breasts, and breastfeeding. A retrospective of female characters in African literature brings an interesting approach to explore the figures of femininity (...)
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  49. Refusing the ‘Foolish Wisdom of Resignation’: Kaupapa Māori in conversation with Adorno.Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach & Carl Mika - 2019 - European Journal of Social Theory:1-18.
    Drawing on select works of Adorno, we will first rehearse his reasons for a rejuvenation of philosophy and apply them to philosophers working on world philosophical traditions. We will then analyse Adorno’s arguments pertaining to the theory–praxis relation to ascertain whether his thought could accommodate a study of world philosophical traditions for the simple reason that they are present in a particular society. Shifting our focus slightly, we reflect upon how current ways of professional philosophizing affect the study of world (...)
     
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  50.  4
    Maori culture and modern ethnology: A preliminary survey, II.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):186 – 201.
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