Results for ' Medical care'

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  1.  10
    Ethical Guidelines for the Care of People in Post-Coma Unresponsiveness (Vegetative State) or a Minimally Responsive State.National Health And Medical Research Council - 2009 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1):367-402.
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  2.  27
    Principles of the German Medical Association concerning terminal medical care.German Medical Association - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (2):254-58.
  3.  27
    Beyond the biomedical model.Palliative Care - 2005 - HEC Forum 17 (3):227-236.
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  4.  79
    Decisions Relating to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: a joint statement from the British Medical Association, the Resuscitation Council (UK) and the Royal College of Nursing.British Medical Association - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):310.
    Summary Principles Timely support for patients and people close to them, and effective, sensitive communication are essential. Decisions must be based on the individual patient's circumstances and reviewed regularly. Sensitive advance discussion should always be encouraged, but not forced. Information about CPR and the chances of a successful outcome needs to be realistic. Practical matters Information about CPR policies should be displayed for patients and staff. Leaflets should be available for patients and people close to them explaining about CPR, how (...)
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  5. Ethical Guidelines for the Care of People in Post-Coma Unresponsiveness (Vegetative State) or a Minimally Responsive State.National Health & Medical Research Council - 2009 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1).
     
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  6.  34
    Health Care in America.Catholic Medical Association - 2010 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 7 (1):181-209.
  7.  42
    Medical Care for Terrorists—To Treat or Not to Treat?Benjamin Gesundheit, Nachman Ash, Shraga Blazer & Avraham I. Rivkind - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (10):40-42.
    With the escalation of terrorism worldwide in recent years, situations arise in which the perpetration of violence and the defense of human rights come into conflict, creating serious ethical problems. The Geneva Convention provides guidelines for the medical treatment of enemy wounded and sick, as well as prisoners of war. However, there are no comparable provisions for the treatment of terrorists, who can be termed unlawful combatants or unprivileged belligerents. Two cases of severely injured terrorists are presented here to (...)
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  8. Medical care in the countryside near Paris, 1800-1914.Evelyn Ackerman - 1983 - In Joseph Warren Dauben & Virginia Staudt Sexton (eds.), History and Philosophy of Science: Selected Papers. New York Academy of Sciences.
     
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  9.  15
    Medical Care of Terrorists is “Beyond the Letter of the Law”.Ari Z. Zivotofsky - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (10):43-45.
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  10.  33
    Medical Care for Terrorists–Yes to Treat!Benjamin Gesundheit, Nachman Ash, Shraga Blazer & Avraham I. Rivkind - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (10):3-4.
    With the escalation of terrorism worldwide in recent years, situations arise in which the perpetration of violence and the defense of human rights come into conflict, creating serious ethical problems. The Geneva Convention provides guidelines for the medical treatment of enemy wounded and sick, as well as prisoners of war. However, there are no comparable provisions for the treatment of terrorists, who can be termed unlawful combatants or unprivileged belligerents. Two cases of severely injured terrorists are presented here to (...)
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  11.  17
    Medical Care on a Balanced Diet.Andrew Ward - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (225):396 - 398.
    Prominent among the principles put forward by Professor Bernard Williams in ‘The Idea of Equality’ were that for every difference in the way men are treated a relevant reason should be given and the proper ground of the distribution of medical care is ill health. Prominent among his conclusions was that we are confronted with an irrational state of affairs where wealth functions as a necessary condition for receiving medical care. In ‘The Idea of Equality Reconsidered’ (...)
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  12.  13
    Medical Care, Medical Costs: The Search for a Health Insurance Policy. Rashi Fein.Jane Lewis - 1987 - Isis 78 (3):444-445.
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  13.  7
    The Medical Care of the Elderly from the Care Provider's Point of View.Lilia Rosenfeld - 2019 - Humanistyka I Przyrodoznawstwo 24:435-453.
    The aging of the population presents modern Western society with a variety of different challenges, especially in the areas of health and medicine. On the one hand, there is the demand of the elderly patients to receive medical treatments that are supposed to improve or preserve the existing quality of life and to prevent the extension of a life without quality, with suffering and pain. On the other hand, aging is accompanied by the appearance and exacerbation of chronic illnesses, (...)
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  14.  8
    Rationing medical care on the basis of age: The moral dimensions.Steven Edwards - 2007 - Nursing Philosophy 8 (2):142–143.
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  15.  86
    Rationing Just Medical Care.Lawrence J. Schneiderman - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (7):7-14.
    U.S. politicians and policymakers have been preoccupied with how to pay for health care. Hardly any thought has been given to what should be paid for—as though health care is a commodity that needs no examination—or what health outcomes should receive priority in a just society, i.e., rationing. I present a rationing proposal, consistent with U.S. culture and traditions, that deals not with “health care,” the terminology used in the current debate, but with the more modest and (...)
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  16.  8
    Medical care and markets: conflicts between efficiency and justice.C. L. Buchanan & Elizabeth W. Prior (eds.) - 1985 - [Carleton, Vic.]: Centre of Policy Studies, Monash University.
  17.  19
    Medical Care for Prisoners: The Evolution of a Civil Right.Wendy K. Mariner - 1981 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 9 (2):4-8.
  18.  4
    Medical Care for Prisoners: The Evolution of a Civil Right.Wendy K. Mariner - 1981 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 9 (2):4-8.
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  19. Medical Care for Tomorrow.Michael M. Davis - 1956 - Science and Society 20 (4):364-367.
     
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  20.  6
    Medical Care at the End of Life.Robert Card - 2006 - Philosophy Now 55:14-17.
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  21.  20
    Medical care in ancient China: Nathan Sivin: Health care in eleventh-century China. New York: Springer, 2015, 223pp, $159HB.Ka-wai Fan - 2016 - Metascience 25 (2):217-220.
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  22.  38
    Crowdfunding for medical care: Ethical issues in an emerging health care funding practice.Jeremy Snyder - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (6):36-42.
    Crowdfunding websites allow users to post a public appeal for funding for a range of activities, including adoption, travel, research, participation in sports, and many others. One common form of crowdfunding is for expenses related to medical care. Medical crowdfunding appeals serve as a means of addressing gaps in medical and employment insurance, both in countries without universal health insurance, like the United States, and countries with universal coverage limited to essential medical needs, like Canada. (...)
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  23.  12
    Medical Care at the End of Life: A Catholic Perspective; Jewish Ethics and the Care of End-of-Life Patients: A Collection of Rabbinical, Bioethical, Philosophical, and Juristic Opinions; Health and Human Flourishing: Religion, Medicine, and Moral Anthropology.Karey Harwood - 2008 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 28 (1):239-243.
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  24.  4
    Medical Care of Prisoners and Detainees. Ciba Foundation Symposium 16. Edited.Gew Wolstenholme - forthcoming - Journal of Biosocial Science.
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  25.  31
    On the Ethics of Medical Care under Resource Constraints.Joseph Agassi - 2007 - Spontaneous Generations 1 (1):4.
    The aim of this discussion is practical; otherwise it largely repeats some very general observations, chiefly historical and philosophical. I boast no expertise in anything specifically medical, to do with either medical care or medical administration. My concern is with the system of medicine and with the ethical and social issues that it involves. Applied philosophy is a still uncharted territory. Philosophers traditionally focus more on justifying accepted solutions than on seeking new solutions to urgent or (...)
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  26. Toward a Standard of Medical Care: Why Medical Professionals Can Refuse to Prescribe Puberty Blockers.Ryan Kulesa - 2022 - The New Bioethics 29 (2):139-155.
    That a standard of medical care must outline services that benefit the patient is relatively uncontroversial. However, one must determine how the practices outlined in a medical standard of care should benefit the patient. I will argue that practices outlined in a standard of medical care must not detract from the patient’s well-functioning and that clinicians can refuse to provide services that do. This paper, therefore, will advance the following two claims: (1) a standard (...)
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  27.  12
    Hospitals Are Not Prisons: Decision-Making Capacity, Autonomy, and the Legal Right to Refuse Medical Care, Including Observation.Megan S. Wright - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (5):37-39.
    Marshall and colleagues (2024) contribute to the literature on autonomy and decision-making capacity by focusing on the case of individuals with opioid use disorder who refuse to remain in the hosp...
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  28.  5
    Doctors, Patients, and Society: Power and Authority in Medical Care.Martin S. Staum, Donald E. Larsen & David J. Roy - 1981 - Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press.
    This book is a collection of papers presented at an interdisciplinary workshop at the Calgary Institute for the Humanities in May 1980. The three broad issues covered are: the physician-patient relationship, the allocation of responsibility among doctors and nurses, and the political and social framework of the health care system. The first set of essays is concerned with the moral and legal aspects of the physician-patient relationship. The link between knowledge and power is examined as well as the moral (...)
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  29. Marginally effective medical care: ethical analysis of issues in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).M. Hilberman, J. Kutner, D. Parsons & D. J. Murphy - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (6):361-367.
    Outcomes from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) remain distressingly poor. Overuse of CPR is attributable to unrealistic expectations, unintended consequences of existing policies and failure to honour patient refusal of CPR. We analyzed the CPR outcomes literature using the bioethical principles of beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justice and developed a proposal for selective use of CPR. Beneficence supports use of CPR when most effective. Non-maleficence argues against performing CPR when the outcomes are harmful or usage inappropriate. Additionally, policies which usurp good clinical (...)
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  30. Dual Loyalties in Military Medical Care – Between Ethics and Effectiveness.Peter Olsthoorn, Myriame Bollen & Robert Beeres - 2013 - In Herman Amersfoort, Rene Moelker, Joseph Soeters & Desiree Verweij (eds.), Moral Responsibility & Military Effectiveness. Asser.
    Military doctors and nurses, working neither as pure soldiers nor as merely doctors or nurses, may face a ‘role conflict between the clinical professional duties to a patient and obligations, express or implied, real or perceived, to the interests of a third party such as an employer, an insurer, the state, or in this context, military command’. This conflict is commonly called dual loyalty. This chapter gives an overview of the military and the medical ethic and of the resulting (...)
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  31.  45
    The Economic Attributes of Medical Care: Implications for Rationing Choices in the United States and United Kingdom.Dwayne A. Banks - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (4):546.
    The healthcare systems of the United States and United Kingdom are vastly different. The former relies primarily on private sector incentives and market forces to allocate medical care services, while the latter is a centrally planned system funded almost entirely by the public sector. Therefore, each nation represents divergent views on the relative efficacy of the market or government in achieving social objectives in the area of medical care policy. Since its inception in 1948, the National (...)
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  32.  4
    Challenges in Medical Care.Andrew Grubb - 1992 - Wiley.
    Challenges in Medical Care Edited by Andrew Grubb School of Law and Centre of Medical Law and Ethics, King’s College, London, UK The sixth volume in the series of King’s College Studies takes a reflective view of medical law and ethics, the health care system and challenges raised by modern technology. A distinguished team of authors returns to problems and controversies that have long challenged medical law and ethics, and shows how new issues are (...)
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  33.  60
    Improving the quality of medical care: the normativity of evidence-based performance standards.Sandra J. Tanenbaum - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):263-277.
    Poor quality medical care is sometimes attributed to physicians’ unwillingness to act on evidence about what works best. Evidence-based performance standards (EBPSs) are one response to this problem, and they are increasingly employed by health care regulators and payers. Evidence in this instance is judged according to the precepts of evidence-based medicine (EBM); it is probabilistic, and the randomized controlled trial (RCT) is the gold standard. This means that EBPSs suffer all the infirmities of EBM generally—well rehearsed (...)
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  34.  44
    Rationing of expensive medical care in a transition country—nihil novum?E. Krizova - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):308-312.
    This article focuses on rationing of expensive medical care in the Czech Republic. It distinguishes between political and clinical decision levels and reviews the debate in the Western literature on explicit and implicit rules. The contemporary situation of the Czech health care system is considered from this perspective. Rationing reoccurred in the mid 90s after the shift in health care financing from fee-for-service to prospective budgets. The lack of explicit rules is obvious. Implicit forms of rationing, (...)
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  35. Corrupt practices in chinese medical care: The root in public policies and a call for confucian-market approach.Ruiping Fan - 2007 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (2):111-131.
    : This paper argues that three salient corrupt practices that mark contemporary Chinese health care, namely the over-prescription of indicated drugs, the prescription of more expensive forms of medication and more expensive diagnostic work-ups than needed, and illegal cash payments to physicians—i.e., red packages—result not from the introduction of the market to China, but from two clusters of circumstances. First, there has been a loss of the Confucian appreciation of the proper role of financial reward for good health (...). Second, misguided governmental policies have distorted the behavior of physicians and hospitals. The distorting policies include (1) setting very low salaries for physicians, (2) providing bonuses to physicians and profits to hospitals from the excessive prescription of drugs and the use of more expensive drugs and unnecessary expensive diagnostic procedures, and (3) prohibiting payments by patients to physicians for higher quality care. The latter problem is complicated by policies that do not allow the use of governmental insurance and funds from medical savings accounts in private hospitals as well as other policies that fail to create a level playing field for both private and government hospitals. The corrupt practices currently characterizing Chinese health care will require not only abolishing the distorting governmental policies but also drawing on Confucian moral resources to establish a rightly directed appreciation of the proper place of financial reward in the practice of medicine. (shrink)
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  36.  26
    Ethics of medical care and clinical research: a qualitative study of principal investigators in biomedical HIV prevention research.Bridget G. Haire - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (4):231-235.
    In clinical research there is a tension between the role of a doctor, who must serve the best interests of the patient, and the role of the researcher, who must produce knowledge that may not have any immediate benefits for the research participant. This tension is exacerbated in HIV research in low and middle income countries, which frequently uncovers comorbidities other than the condition under study. Some bioethicists argue that as the goals of medicine and those of research are distinct, (...)
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  37.  27
    Equality and rights in medical care.Charles Fried - 1976 - Hastings Center Report 6 (1):29-34.
  38.  26
    Unmet need for additional medical care for sick children in mother's view in rural bangladesh: Implications for improving child health services.Nurul Alam - 2007 - Journal of Biosocial Science 39 (5):769-778.
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  39.  24
    Consciousness and Personhood in Medical Care.Stefanie Blain-Moraes, Eric Racine & George A. Mashour - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  40.  30
    Justice, medicine, and medical care.Rosamond Rhodes - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (2):32 – 33.
  41.  6
    Acid Violence And Medical Care In Bangladesh: Women’s Activism as Carework.Afroza Anwary - 2003 - Gender and Society 17 (2):305-313.
    Acid attacks on women are increasing at alarming rates in Bangladesh, but the government has failed to provide medical care to the victims. Easily available sulfuric acid, which can mutilate a human face in moments, has emerged as a weapon used to disfigure a woman’s body. By the mid-1990s, activists had documented acid attacks, and urban protests were followed by demands for better medical care. I show how the interaction between local and international-level civil society organizations (...)
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  42.  57
    Paying for medical care: A jewish view.Elliot N. Dorff - 1997 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (1):15-30.
    : According to Jewish law, there is a clear obligation to try to heal, and this duty devolves upon both the physician and the society. Jewish sources make it clear that health care is not only an individual and familial responsibility, but also a communal one. This social aspect of health care manifests itself in Jewish law in two ways: first, no community is complete until it has the personnel (and, one assumes, the facilities) to provide health (...); second, the community must pay for the health care of those who cannot afford it as part of its provision for the poor. The community, in turn, must use its resources wisely, which is the moral basis within the Jewish tradition for some system of managed care. The community must balance its commitment to provide health care with the provision of other services. (shrink)
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  43.  10
    Navigating difficult decisions in medical care and research.Rosalind J. McDougall - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (6):351-352.
    The articles in this issue explore a number of difficult choices in medical care and research. They investigate ethical complexity in a range of decisions faced by policymakers and clinicians, and offer new evidence or normative approaches for navigating this complexity. In this issue’s feature article, Ford and colleagues engage with an ethical challenge faced by policymakers in relation to health research: should free text data contained in medical records be shared for research purposes?1 While some types (...)
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  44.  11
    Medical Care of Prisoners and Detainees. Ciba Foundation Symposium 16. G. E. W. Wolstenholme and Maeve O'connor Pp. 238. (Elsevier-Excerpta Medica, North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1973.) Price Dfl. 30.50. [REVIEW]Lord Platt - 1974 - Journal of Biosocial Science 6 (3):391-393.
  45.  36
    Depriving Prisoners of Medical Care: A 'Cruel and Unusual' Punishment.Nancy Neveloff Dubler - 1979 - Hastings Center Report 9 (5):7-10.
  46.  44
    Refusals of Medical Care in the Home Setting.Nancy Neveloff Dubler - 1990 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 18 (3):227-233.
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  47.  25
    Refusals of Medical Care in the Home Setting.Nancy Neveloff Dubler - 1990 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 18 (3):227-233.
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  48.  25
    Choosing Medical Care in Old Age: What Kind, How Much, When to Stop. Muriel R. Gillick. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1994. [REVIEW]Nancy S. Jecker - 1995 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (4):553.
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  49.  28
    Why Should Medical Care Be Family-Centered?: Understanding Ethical Responsibilities for Patients' Family Members.Nate W. Olson - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (2):159-185.
    In recent years, hospitals, clinics, and professional organizations have with increasing frequency pledged their commitment to “patient-and family-centered care”. The movement toward PFCC is especially pronounced in pediatrics, where the American Academy of Pediatrics has a long-held, explicit commitment to PFCC. However, the unified movement toward PFCC obscures differing conceptions of its purpose. First, patient-centered care, as opposed to provider- or disease-centered care, focuses on increasing patient involvement in care to accomplish two related, but distinct objectives: (...)
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  50.  8
    Limitation of Medical Care: An Ethnographic Analysis.W. Ventres, M. Nichter, R. Reed & R. Frankel - 1993 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 4 (2):134-145.
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