Results for 'Longus'

29 found
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  1.  3
    Longus, Antiphon, and the Topography of Lesbos.Peter Green - 1982 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 102:210-214.
    SinceDaphnis and Chloeis a work of fiction, modern criticism has paid little attention to the topographical details of Lesbos which Longus scatters through his work. Today a preoccupation with biographical or topographical realism in literature is out of fashion, and Longus's world has in any case been described, by one of his most percipient modern critics, as ‘un monde des plus irréels’. Yet just as Longus's women reveal a striking blend of fictional romance and social realism, so (...)
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  2.  2
    Longus’ Narrator: A Reassessment.Calum A. Maciver - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (2):827-845.
    An influential position in the scholarship on Longus is that the narrator of Daphnis and Chloe is dissociated from, and ironized by, the author. Two articles by John Morgan, in particular, have propounded this interpretation. Morgan argues that Longus’ narrator relates the story with simplicity and naivety, and in ignorance of the more complex subtleties to which only Longus and the more discerning reader have access: ‘Daphnis and Chloe is told by its narrator as if it were (...)
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  3.  47
    Longus' Daphnis and Chloe. [REVIEW]J. M. Edmonds - 1910 - The Classical Review 24 (5):156-157.
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  4.  37
    Longus, Daphnis and Chloe. [REVIEW]H. H. O. Chalk - 1957 - The Classical Review 7 (3-4):257-257.
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  5.  39
    Diplodocus Longus in Wyoming.J. P. Bergman, R. P. Hamilton & J. F. Thorning - 1926 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 1 (3):458-473.
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  6.  33
    Henderson Longus: Daphnis and Chloe. Xenophon of Ephesus: Anthia and Habrocomes. Pp. Xiv + 370. Cambridge, MA and London: Harvard University Press, 2009. Cased, £15.95, €22.50, US$24. ISBN: 978-0-674-99633-5. [REVIEW]I. Repath - 2010 - The Classical Review 60 (2):610-611.
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  7.  23
    Two Paintings in Longus' Daphnis and Chloe.Carole E. Newlands - 1986 - Semiotics:23-32.
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  8.  11
    Musculus Palmaris Longus: Influence on Playing Capability of Keyboard Musicians – Preliminary Report.Krzysztof Dąbrowski, Hanna Stankiewicz-Jóźwicka, Arkadiusz Kowalczyk, Michał Markuszewski & Bogdan Ciszek - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  9.  11
    The Lexicon of Love: Longus and Philetas Grammatikos.Tim Whitmarsh - 2005 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 125:145-148.
    This article offers a fresh approach to the well-known questions surrounding the identification of Longus' character Philetas with the Hellenistic poet Philetas or Philitas. Noting that the poet was famed in antiquity also for his critical writing, particularly his lexicographical work the ataktoi gls.
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  10. A New Commentary on Longus - (E.) Bowie (Ed.) Longus: Daphnis and Chloe. Pp. X + 338. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019. Paper, £24.99, Us$32.99 (Cased, £79.99, Us$105). Isbn: 978-0-521-77659-2 (978-0-521-77220-4 Hbk). [REVIEW]Claire Rachel Jackson - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
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  11.  31
    Attic Idylls: Hierarchies of Herdsmen and Social Status in Alciphron and Longus.Owen Hodkinson - 2012 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 132:41-53.
    The in pastoral (cowherd > shepherd > goatherd) as discussed by ancient critics of Theocritus and Virgil was an important facet of ancient readers' engagement with this literature; it was known to imperial authors of prose pastoral Longus (1.16.1) and Alciphron (2.33.1-2), who each allude to it and adapt it to their own unique receptions of the pastoral tradition. Alciphron is concerned with hierarchies of wealth and status among his characters; he uses his readers' awareness of hierarchy as a (...)
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  12.  20
    The Budé Edition of Longus Longus: Pastorales. Texte Établi Et Traduit Par G. Dalmeyda. Pp. Lv + 114 (106 Double). Paris: 'Les Belles Lettres,' 1934. Paper, 20 Francs. [REVIEW]R. M. Rattenbury - 1935 - The Classical Review 49 (04):135-.
  13.  27
    The Budé Longus J.-R. Vieillefond: Longus, Pastorales (Daphnis Et Chloé). (Collection des Universités de France, Budé.) Pp. Ccxxi + 166 (Text Double). Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1987. [REVIEW]B. P. Reardon - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (02):237-238.
  14.  20
    The Budé Longus.B. P. Reardon - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (02):237-.
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  15.  5
    Fulvio Orsini and Longus.Michael D. Reeve - 1979 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 99:165-167.
  16.  49
    Antiphon: Discours, suivis des fragments d'Antiphon le SophisteIsee: DiscoursJulien, I. 1: DiscoursLongus: Pastorales Platon, IV. 3: PhedrePlaton VI.: La Republique I-IIIPlaton VII. 1: La Republique IV-VII and VII. 2: La Republique VIII-XThe Greek Particles. [REVIEW]G. T., L. Gernet, Antiphon, P. Roussel, J. Bidez, I. Julien, G. Dalmeyda, Longus, L. Robin, I. V. Platon, E. Chambry, A. Dies, Platon Vi, Platon Vii & J. D. Denniston - 1935 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 55:106.
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  17.  38
    Daphnis and Chloe Michael D. Reeve: Longus, Daphnis Et Chloe. (Bibliotheca ScriptorumGraecorum Et Romanorum Teubneriana.) Pp. Xix+105; 2 Plates. Leipzig: Teubner, 1982. 39.50 M. [REVIEW]J. R. Morgan - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (01):24-25.
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  18.  5
    A Further Attempt on ‘SPE Longus', Horace A.P. 172.J. G. F. Powell - 1984 - Classical Quarterly 34 (1):240-241.
    …vel quod res omnes timide gelideque ministrat, dilator, † spe longus, iners avidusque futuri, diffcilis, querulus… I agree with Brink, and other editors referred to by him ad loe, that spe longus in Horace's description of the typical old man's character cannot be made to give sense. For earlier attempts at emendation, see Brink's note. Most of those who have tried to emend the passage concentrate on longus, and are reluctant to relinquish spe: this is largely due (...)
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  19.  28
    Theocritus' Seventh Idyll, Philetas and Longus.E. L. Bowie - 1985 - Classical Quarterly 35 (01):67-.
    Few years pass without an attempt to interpret Theocritus, Idyll 7. The poem's narrative and descriptive skill, dramatic subtlety and felicity of language are mercifully more than adequate to survive these scholarly onslaughts, so I have less hesitation in offering my own interpretation. The poem's chief problems seem to me to arise from uncertainty as to: Who is the narrator, and why are we kept waiting until line 21 before we are told that he is called Simichidas? Who, or what (...)
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  20.  7
    A Further Attempt on 'SPE Longus', Horace A.P. 172.J. G. F. Powell - 1984 - Classical Quarterly 34 (01):240-.
    …vel quod res omnes timide gelideque ministrat, dilator, † spe longus, iners avidusque futuri, diffcilis, querulus… I agree with Brink, and other editors referred to by him ad loe, that spe longus in Horace's description of the typical old man's character cannot be made to give sense. For earlier attempts at emendation, see Brink's note . Most of those who have tried to emend the passage concentrate on longus, and are reluctant to relinquish spe: this is largely (...)
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  21.  4
    Die Hirten des Dionysos: Die Dionysos-Mysterien der Römischen Kaiserzeit Und der Bukolische Roman des Longus.Reinhold Merkelbach - 1988 - De Gruyter.
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  22.  5
    Honey and the Effects of Chloe's Kiss at Longus 1.25. 2.Stephen M. Trzaskoma - 2007 - Hermes 135 (3):352-357.
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  23.  22
    Daphnis and Chloe and Dionysus Reinhold Merkelbach: Die Hirten des Dionysos: Die Dionysos-Mysterien der römischen Kaiserzeit und der bukolische Roman des Longus. Pp. xvii + 290; 88 illustrations. Stuttgart: Teubner, 1988. DM 168. [REVIEW]B. P. Reardon - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (01):81-82.
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  24.  3
    The Pronunciation of Syllable Coda M in Classical Latin: A Reassessment of Some Evidence From Latin Grammarians.Javier Uría - 2019 - American Journal of Philology 140 (3):439-476.
    This article reviews the text and interpretation of some ancient evidence on the pronunciation of syllable coda m in Latin. Crucial textual emendations are suggested for passages by Annaeus Cornutus and Velius Longus, and the resulting evidence is reinterpreted in the light of current phonological theories. Some of the accepted views on the pronunciation of –m are challenged by highlighting the likely sound variation in neutralization contexts. The evidence from both grammarians and inscriptions reveals that the possibility of m (...)
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  25.  5
    Pseudo-Lucian’s Cnidian Aphrodite: A Statue of Flesh, Stone, and Words.Laura Bottenberg - 2020 - Millennium 17 (1):115-138.
    The aim of this paper is to analyse a literary response to antiquity’s most alluring work of art, the Cnidian Aphrodite. It argues that the ecphrasis of the statue in the Amores develops textual and verbal strategies to provoke in the recipients the desire to see the Cnidia, but eventually frustrates this desire. The ecphrasis thereby creates a discrepancy between the characters’ aesthetic experience of the statue and the visualisation and aesthetic experience of the recipients of the text. The erotic (...)
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  26.  5
    Formes Et Fonctions Fictionnelles de la Muthologia.Michel Briand - 2006 - Kernos 19.
    Après la muthologia catalogique ou diégétique dans les romans sophistiques de Tatius et Longus, cette étude porte sur katalegein chez Tatius et Héliodore, puis sur les muthoi en catalogue chez Chariton et Héliodore, avant d’observer les Éphésiaques de Xénophon, en tant que catalogue ou résumé. Paradoxalement, les deux romans méta-fictionnels, qui explicitent leur énonciation mythologique en catalogue dès le préambule, Tatius et Longus, rejoignent le roman le plus linéaire, celui de Xénophon, dont la structure en catalogue est affirmée, (...)
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  27.  7
    A Note on Some Unusual Greek Words for Eyes.E. K. Borthwick - 1980 - Classical Quarterly 30 (1):252-256.
    In Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society N.S. 14, 68, D. C. C. Young drew attention to a curious variant in the text of Longus 2.2.1, where, in a description of how, at the vintage, women ‘eyed’ Daphnis, A has concluding that ‘brothers’ must be a colloquial expression for ‘eyes’, he was however unable to cite any other example of this usage, but compared ‘picked men’, in Paulus Silentiarius, a locution found in a small range of other authors, as (...)
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  28.  10
    Another Early Reader of Pausanias?Anthony M. Snodgrass - 2003 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 123:187-189.
    It is argued that Athenagoras, Leg. 17, draws on Pausanias 1.26.4, and may join Aelian, Pollux, Philostratus and Longus in the list of possible readers of the periegete.
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  29.  19
    Ecos de la novela griega en el Renacimiento.Lourdes Rojas Álvarez - 2012 - Synthesis (la Plata) 19:00-00.
    La novela griega, género polifacético de ficción en prosa, que floreció del siglo I al IV d.C., tuvo su continuación en la literatura bizantina. La trascendencia de la novela llegó al Renacimiento con Longo y su Dafnis y Cloe, que influenció obras como la Arcadia de Sanazzaro, en Italia, o la Diana, de Jorge de Montemayor, en España; y tuvo cierto influjo en la Galatea de Cervantes e incluso en El Quijote. También la Arcadia de Sidney es tributaria del tema (...)
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