Results for 'Jazz vocals'

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  1.  49
    Jazz Vocal Interpretation: A Philosophical Analysis.Jerrold Levinson - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (1):35-43.
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  2. Jazz and the Philosophy of Art.Lee B. Brown & David Goldblatt - 2018 - Routledge.
    Co-authored by three prominent philosophers of art, Jazz and the Philosophy of Art is the first book in English to be exclusively devoted to philosophical issues in jazz. It covers such diverse topics as minstrelsy, bebop, Voodoo, social and tap dancing, parades, phonography, musical forgeries, and jazz singing, as well as Goodman's allographic/autographic distinction, Adorno's critique of popular music, and what improvisation is and is not. The book is organized into three parts. Drawing on innovative strategies adopted (...)
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  3.  3
    Song, Songs, and Singing.Jeanette Bicknell & John Andrew Fisher (eds.) - 2013 - Wiley.
    The last twenty years or so have seen a surge of interest in the philosophy of music. However there is comparatively little philosophical literature devoted specifically to songs, singing and vocal music in general. This new collection of essays on the philosophical aspects of song and singing includes articles on the relationship between words and music in songs, the ontology of songs and recordings, meaning in songs, the metaphysics of vocal music in opera and the movies, and the ethical challenges (...)
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  4.  49
    Vocal Development as a Guide to Modeling the Evolution of Language.D. Kimbrough Oller, Ulrike Griebel & Anne S. Warlaumont - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):382-392.
    Modeling of evolution and development of language has principally utilized mature units of spoken language, phonemes and words, as both targets and inputs. This approach cannot address the earliest phases of development because young infants are unable to produce such language features. We argue that units of early vocal development—protophones and their primitive illocutionary/perlocutionary forces—should be targeted in evolutionary modeling because they suggest likely units of hominin vocalization/communication shortly after the split from the chimpanzee/bonobo lineage, and because early development of (...)
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  5.  25
    Jazz and Musical Works: Hypnotized by the Wrong Model.John Andrew Fisher - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (2):151-162.
    It is difficult to place jazz within a philosophy of music dominated by the concepts and practices of classical music. One key puzzle concerns the nature and role, if any, of musical works in jazz. I briefly describe the debate between those who deny that there are musical works in jazz (Kania) and those who affirm that there are such (Dodd and others). I argue that musical works are performed in jazz but that jazz performance (...)
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  6.  19
    Jazz and Philosophical Contrapunteo: Philosophies of La Vida in the Americas on Behalf of Radical Democracy.Gregory Fernando Pappas - 2021 - The Pluralist 16 (1):1-25.
    the saap 2020 conference in mexico is the culmination of an internal and gradual transformation in SAAP that has taken many years. I came to this organization as a graduate student. I was then the only Latino and Leonard Harris the only African American philosopher in SAAP. Thanks to the efforts of many scholars and presidents, SAAP has come to recognize the important philosophical contributions of female, African American, Indigenous, and Latinx philosophers. Let's not take for granted how we got (...)
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  7.  9
    Learning Jazz Language by Aural Imitation: A Usage-Based Communicative Jazz Theory.Mattias Solli, Erling Aksdal & John Pål Inderberg - 2021 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 55 (4):82-122.
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  8. Jazz Bands, Camping Trips and Decommodification: G. A. Cohen on Community.N. Vrousalis - 2012 - Socialist Studies 8 (1):141-163.
  9.  10
    Vocal Emotion Recognition Across Disparate Cultures.Gregory Bryant & H. Clark Barrett - 2008 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 8 (1-2):135-148.
    There exists substantial cultural variation in how emotions are expressed, but there is also considerable evidence for universal properties in facial and vocal affective expressions. This is the first empirical effort examining the perception of vocal emotional expressions across cultures with little common exposure to sources of emotion stimuli, such as mass media. Shuar hunter-horticulturalists from Amazonian Ecuador were able to reliably identify happy, angry, fearful and sad vocalizations produced by American native English speakers by matching emotional spoken utterances to (...)
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  10.  6
    The Evolution of Human Vocal Emotion.Gregory A. Bryant - 2020 - Emotion Review 13 (1):25-33.
    Vocal affect is a subcomponent of emotion programs that coordinate a variety of physiological and psychological systems. Emotional vocalizations comprise a suite of vocal behaviors shaped by evolution to solve adaptive social communication problems. The acoustic forms of vocal emotions are often explicable with reference to the communicative functions they serve. An adaptationist approach to vocal emotions requires that we distinguish between evolved signals and byproduct cues, and understand vocal affect as a collection of multiple strategic communicative systems subject to (...)
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  11.  4
    Learning Jazz Language by Aural Imitation: A Usage-Based Communicative Jazz Theory.Mattias Solli, Erling Aksdal & John Pål Inderberg - 2022 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 56 (1):94-123.
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  12.  21
    The Jazz Solo as Virtuous Act.Stefan Caris Love - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (1):61-74.
    This article presents a new aesthetic of the improvised jazz solo, an aesthetic grounded in the premise that a solo is an act indivisible from the actor and the context. The solo's context includes the local and large-scale conventions of jazz performance as well as the soloist's other work. The theme on which a solo is based serves not as a “work,” but as part of the solo's stylistic context. Knowledge of this context inheres directly into proper apprehension (...)
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  13.  32
    Different Vocal Parameters Predict Perceptions of Dominance and Attractiveness.Carolyn R. Hodges-Simeon, Steven J. C. Gaulin & David A. Puts - 2010 - Human Nature 21 (4):406-427.
    Low mean fundamental frequency (F 0) in men’s voices has been found to positively influence perceptions of dominance by men and attractiveness by women using standardized speech. Using natural speech obtained during an ecologically valid social interaction, we examined relationships between multiple vocal parameters and dominance and attractiveness judgments. Male voices from an unscripted dating game were judged by men for physical and social dominance and by women in fertile and non-fertile menstrual cycle phases for desirability in short-term and long-term (...)
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  14.  6
    Revisiting Vocal Perception in Non-Human Animals: A Review of Vowel Discrimination, Speaker Voice Recognition, and Speaker Normalization. [REVIEW]Buddhamas Kriengwatana, Paola Escudero & Carel ten Cate - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  15.  22
    Jazz Improvisers' Shared Understanding: A Case Study.Michael F. Schober & Neta Spiro - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  16. Primate Vocal and Gestural Communication.Michael Tomasello & Klaus Zuberbühler - 2002 - In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. MIT Press. pp. 293--29.
  17.  2
    Jazz-Philosophy Fusion.James Tartaglia - 2016 - Performance Philosophy 2 (1):99-114.
    In this paper I describe and provide a justification for the fusion of jazz music and philosophy which I have developed; the justification is provided from the perspectives of both jazz and philosophy. I discuss two of my compositions, based on philosophical ideas presented by Schopenhauer and Derek Parfit respectively; links to sound files are provided. The justification emerging from this discussion is that philosophy produces ‘non-argumentative effects’ which provide suitable material for artistic expression and exploration. These effects (...)
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  18. Jazz Improvisation and Ethical Interaction : A Sketch of the Connections.Garry L. Hagberg - 2008 - In Garry Hagberg (ed.), Art and Ethical Criticism. Blackwell.
     
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  19. Jazz is the Sound of God Laughing.Colleen Shaddox - 2006 - In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
     
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  20. Jazz Improvisation, the Body, and the Ordinary.William Day - 2002 - Tidskrift För Kulturstudier 5:80-94.
    What is one doing when one improvises music, as one does in jazz? There are two sorts of account prominent in jazz literature. The traditional answer is that one is organizing sound materials in the only way they can be organized if they are to be musical. This implies that jazz solos are to be interpreted with the procedures of written music in mind. A second, more controversial answer is offered in David Sudnow's pioneering account of the (...)
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  21.  86
    Jazz Redux: A Reply to Möller.Laura Schroeter & François Schroeter - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 170 (2):303-316.
    This paper is a response to Niklas Möller’s (Philosophical Studies, 2013) recent criticism of our relational (Jazz) model of meaning of thin evaluative terms. Möller’s criticism rests on a confusion about the role of coordinating intentions in Jazz. This paper clarifies what’s distinctive and controversial about the Jazz proposal and explains why Jazz, unlike traditional accounts of meaning, is not committed to analycities.
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  22.  10
    Vocal Delivery of Audio Description by Genre: Measuring Users’ Presence.Agnieszka Walczak & Louise Fryer - 2018 - Perspectives 26 (1):69-83.
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  23.  13
    Gestural-Vocal Deixis and Representational Skills in Early Language Development.Elena Antinoro Pizzuto, Micaela Capobianco & Antonella Devescovi - 2005 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 6 (2):223-252.
    This study explores the use of deictic gestures, vocalizations and words compared to content-loaded, or representational gestures and words in children’s early one- and two-element utterances. We analyze the spontaneous production of four children, observed longitudinally from 10–12 to 24–25 months of age, focusing on the components of children’s utterances, the information encoded, and the temporal relationship between gestures and vocalizations or words that were produced in combination. Results indicate that while the gestural and vocal modalities are meaningfully and temporally (...)
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  24.  20
    Jazz, the Wound: Negative Identity, Culture, and the Problem of Weak Subjectivity in Theodor Adorno’s Twentieth Century.Eric Oberle - 2016 - Modern Intellectual History 13 (2):357-386.
    This essay addresses the emergence of theories of “identity” in twentieth-century politics, aesthetics, and philosophy by considering Theodor Adorno's understanding of “negative identity” as a form of coercive categorization that nevertheless contains social knowledge. A historical account of the Frankfurt school's relation to questions of race, anti-Semitism, and the idea of culture, the essay analyzes Adorno's infamous jazz articles in light of the transatlantic history of Marxian political theory and its understanding of racism, subject–object relations, and models of cultural (...)
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  25. Jazz: A People's Music.Sidney Finkelstein & Charles T. Smith - 1949 - Science and Society 13 (2):186-191.
     
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  26.  34
    Über Jazz.Hektor Rottweiler - 1936 - Zeitschrift für Sozialforschung 5 (2):235-59.
    The social function of jazz in its theoretical aspects is the subject of the present article. The author opens his discussion with a technical analysis of jazz music, on the basis of which the social significance of jazz phenomena is elucidated.The peculiar effects of jazz music are by no means limited to the upper layers of society ; they permeate the whole of society. The music has a pseudo-democratic quality, characteristic of the monopolistic phase of capitalism. (...) music is usually trite, and its orginality, however limited, manifests itself chiefly in the variations of forms in which it is reproduced*The realm of jazz ranges from „salon music“ to the military march* The former expresses a false individualism ; the latter a false collectivism. The Jazz represents a sort of conduit between these two poles, particularly in its form of „hot music“. A theory of jazz will have to dwell especially on this ambivalence. Its meaning is explained by an analogy to eccentric clowns whose inability to obey the norm of regular movement reveals itself finally as a superiority over these rules, which allows the eccentric to play with them. Thus the idea of jazz is to prove that divergence from the norm is observed as a rule throughout the total structure.The pattern of this breaking and observing of the rule at the same time is the syncope. The mechanism of its function is interpreted as a kind of unconscious and paradoxical unity of fear and fulfillment, through obedience and reward by society. The antagonistic character of jazz is expressed by the formula that the „subject of jazz“ permits itself to be annihilated by society in order to feel itself endorsed and vindicated by society.L'article présente certains éléments d'une théorie sociale du Jazz* Il utilise en particulier l'analyse technique, dont les résultats sont interprétés comme expression psychologique de réalités sociales. Le Jazz est défini „phénomène d'interférence“ entre une liberté d'improvisation du sujet, liberté tout apparente, et l'instance sociale à laquelle le sujet est soumis et qui est représenté dans la musique par le rythme et le son fondamentaux rigidement maintenus. Le Jazz lui-même n'est pas irrationnel ou archaïque, il est donné comme tel, il est „fuite du monde des marchandises dans le monde des marchandises“ ; ses traits archaïques sont en tant que tels modernes, c'est-à-dire des régressions psychologiques. C'est pourquoi, précisément en tant que marchandise, il doit se donner à la fois pour ancien et nouveau, original et banal.A l'origine, le produit est banal, originales sont, dans des limites très étroites, les transformations de celui-ci par la reproduction. Mais l'apparente liberté de la reproduction est démasquée par la démonstration qu'elle ne touche pas à la „substance“ banale. Même la rationalisation, en apparence progressive, du processus du travail entre production et reproduction ne correspond pas à la réalité. Particulièrement importante, sur ce point,, est la signification de l'amateur comme représentant du public. Au pôle opposé on trouve la musique d'art d'hier, dépravée et dépouillée de ses éléments progressifs : celle de l'impressionnisme.L'extension du Jazz est limitée par les pôles extrêmes de la musique de salon d'une part, et de la marche d'autre part, celle-là expression d'une illusoire subjectivité, celle-ci expression d'une instance sociale inhumaine. Entre ces extrêmes la „Hot Musique“ prend une position intermédiaire paradoxale et elle s’est stabilisée aujourd’hui en „Jazz classique“. C’est celui-ci que doit considérer en premier lieu la théorie du Jazz. Celle-ci est rapprochée de la figure de 1’ „excentrique“ : de même que l’incapacité de celui-ci d’obéir aux lois du mouvement s’affirme comme un jeu supérieur, ainsi l’idée du Jazz est de démontrer la rupture de la norme — la syncope — à travers toute la structure comme l’achèvement de la norme même. Le mécanisme qui agit dans ce cas, comme dans celui des „steeps“ ralentis est de nature érotique : unité d’angoisse, de tentative d’évasion, et d’assouvissement par le fait de trouver dans la société à la fois place et récompense. (shrink)
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  27. Report Vocal-Tract Resonances as Indexical Cues in Rhesus Monkeys.Nikos Logothetis - unknown
    Asif A. Ghazanfar,1,3,* Hjalmar K. Turesson,1,3 statistical pattern recognition [16, 17] and psychophys- Joost X. Maier,1 Ralph van Dinther,2 ics [13, 18–23] have suggested that formants are signif- Roy D. Patterson,2 and Nikos K. Logothetis1 icant contributors to these indexical cues. It is likely, 1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics then, that detecting formants could have provided 72076 Tuebingen ancestral primates with indexical cues necessary for Germany navigating the complex social interactions that are the 2Centre for the Neural Basis of (...)
     
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  28.  6
    Civic Jazz by Gregory Clark.Maurice Charland - 2017 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 50 (1):119-125.
    Civic Jazz asks us to expand our understanding of what it means to say that jazz is an American art form. While Clark is clearly a fan, with an intimate knowledge of jazz, its culture, and community, this book offers more than anecdote and description, which is so common in jazz studies. Rather, this well-crafted book extends and offers a theoretical basis to the idea, put forward by Wynton Marsalis, Albert Murray, Ralph Ellison, and most recently (...)
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  29.  12
    Vocal Parameters of Speech and Singing Covary and Are Related to Vocal Attractiveness, Body Measures, and Sociosexuality: A Cross-Cultural Study.Jaroslava Varella Valentova, Petr Tureček, Marco Antonio Corrêa Varella, Pavel Šebesta, Francisco Dyonisio C. Mendes, Kamila Janaina Pereira, Lydie Kubicová, Petra Stolařová & Jan Havlíček - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  30.  40
    Audio-Vocal Monitoring System Revealed by Mu-Rhythm Activity.Takeshi Tamura, Atsuko Gunji, Hiroshige Takeichi, Hiroaki Shigemasu, Masumi Inagaki, Makiko Kaga & Michiteru Kitazaki - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
  31.  6
    Vocal Signals Only Impact Speakers’ Own Emotions When They Are Self-Attributed.Louise Goupil, Petter Johansson, Lars Hall & Jean-Julien Aucouturier - 2021 - Consciousness and Cognition 88:103072.
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  32.  5
    Danse, jazz et technique chez Siegfried Kracauer.Pascal Michon - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    Ce texte est un extrait de P. Michon, Rythmes, pouvoir, mondialisation, Paris, PUF, 2005, p. 199-206. De 1921 à 1933, Siegfried Kracauer, un ancien élève de Simmel, était journaliste à la Frankfurter Zeitung, où il s'est rapidement imposé comme l'un des observateurs les plus aigus de son époque. On connaît le contexte : à l'instar de la Russie, l'Allemagne est sortie totalement bouleversée de la guerre perdue ; la monarchie s'y est écroulée et une tentative de révolution communiste y a (...)
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  33.  32
    Jazz Improvisation : A Mimetic Art ?Garry Hagberg - 2006 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 4:469-485.
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  34.  2
    Jazz - Fans.Roger Lefèvre - 1957 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 12 (3):323 - 324.
  35. Jazz, Modernism, and Murals in New Deal New York.Jody Patterson - 2011 - In Charlotte De Mille (ed.), Music and Modernism, C. 1849-1950. Cambridge Scholars Press.
     
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  36. Knowing as Instancing: Jazz Improvisation and Moral Perfectionism.William Day - 2000 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):99-111.
    This essay presents an approach to understanding improvised music, finding in the work of certain outstanding jazz musicians an emblem of Ralph Waldo Emerson's notion of self-trust and of Stanley Cavell's notion of moral perfectionism. The essay critiques standard efforts to interpret improvised solos as though they were composed, contrasting that approach to one that treats the procedures of improvisation as derived from our everyday actions. It notes several levels of correspondence between our interest in jazz improvisations and (...)
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  37.  20
    A Vocal Basis for the Affective Character of Musical Mode in Melody.Daniel L. Bowling - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
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  38.  27
    Vocal Imitation of Song and Speech.James T. Mantell & Peter Q. Pfordresher - 2013 - Cognition 127 (2):177-202.
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  39.  7
    Enacting a Jazz Beat: Temporality in Sonic Environment and Symbolic Communication.Mattias Solli & Thomas Netland - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (4):485-504.
    What does it mean to enact a jazz beat as a creative performer? This article offers a critical reading of Iyer’s much-cited theory on rhythmic enaction. We locate the sonic environment approach in Iyer’s theory, and criticize him for advancing a one-to-one relationship between everyday perception and full-fledged aural competence of jazz musicians, and for comparing the latter with non-symbolic behaviour of non-human organisms. As an alternative, we suggest a Merleau-Ponty-inspired concept of rhythmic enaction, which we call the (...)
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  40.  7
    Complex Vocal Learning and Three-Dimensional Mating Environments.Jan Verpooten - 2021 - Biology and Philosophy 36 (2):1-31.
    Complex vocal learning, the capacity to imitate new sounds, underpins the evolution of animal vocal cultures and song dialects and is a key prerequisite for human speech and song. Due to its relevance for the understanding of cultural evolution and the biology and evolution of language and music, the trait has gained much scholarly attention. However, while we have seen tremendous progress with respect to our understanding of its morphological, neurological and genetic aspects, its peculiar phylogenetic distribution has remained elusive. (...)
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  41.  26
    Vocal Learning, Prosody, and Basal Ganglia: Don't Underestimate Their Complexity.Andrea Ravignani, Mauricio Martins & W. Tecumseh Fitch - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (6):570-571.
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  42. Introduction: Vocalize to Localize? A Call for Better Crosstalk Between Auditory and Visual Communication Systems Researchers.Christian Abry, Anne Vilain & Jean-Luc Schwartz - 2005 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 5 (3):313-325.
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  43.  11
    Jazz at the Crossroads.Ronald Pearsall - 1963 - New Blackfriars 44 (515):224-227.
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  44.  28
    Animal Vocalization and Human Polyglossia in Walter of Bibbesworth’s Thirteenth-Century Domestic Treatise in Anglo-Norman French and Middle English.William Sayers - 2009 - Sign Systems Studies 37 (3/4):525-541.
    Walter of Bibbesworth’s late thirteenth-century versified treatise on French vocabulary relevant to the management of estates in Britain has the first extensive list of animal vocalizations in a European vernacular. Many of the Anglo-Norman French names for animals and their sounds are glossed in Middle English, inviting both diachronic and synchronic views of the capacity of these languages for onomatopoetic formation and reflection on the interest of these social and linguistic communities in zoosemiotics.
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  45. Vocal Interaction Dynamics of Children with and Without Autism.Anne S. Warlaumont, D. Kimbrough Oller, Rick Dale, Jeffrey A. Richards, Jill Gilkerson & Dongxin Xu - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society.
     
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  46.  21
    Introduction: Vocalize to Localize? A Call for Better Crosstalk Between Auditory and Visual Communication Systems Researchers: From Meerkats to Humans.Christian Abry, Anne Vilain & Jean-Luc Schwartz - 2005 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 5 (3):313-325.
  47.  11
    Jazz as Critique: Adorno and Black Expression Revisited.James B. Haile - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
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  48.  57
    Jazz After Jazz : Ken Burns and the Construction of Jazz History.Theodore Gracyk - 2002 - Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):173-187.
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  49.  4
    Contentious Tactics as Jazz Performances: A Pragmatist Approach to the Study of Repertoire Change.Tomás Gold - forthcoming - Sociological Theory:073527512211106.
    The metaphor of “repertoire” is increasingly used in the study of contention to convey the fact that people act collectively through a limited set of cultural routines. Yet despite its broad adoption, the term is loosely defined and rarely subject to empirical verification. This has led to unfruitful scholarly disputes, with most perspectives assuming that change in repertoires is independent from how actors perform them. Drawing a parallel between the dynamics of repertoire performance and jazz improvisation, I propose a (...)
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  50.  8
    Jurus, Jazz Riffs and the Constitution of a National Martial Art in Indonesia.Lee Wilson - 2009 - Body and Society 15 (3):93-119.
    Pencak Silat is a martial art, performance practice and system of body cultivation prevalent throughout much of Indonesia and the Malay-speaking world. This article compares different modalities of the practice and pedagogy of Sundanese Pencak Silat in West Java with more recent attempts to standardize practice at a national level under the auspices of the Indonesian Pencak Silat Association. Drawing on David Sudnow’s seminal account of learning how to play jazz piano, it is suggested that learning how to improvise (...)
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