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Paul Faulkner [37]Joanne Faulkner [27]Andrew Faulkner [16]Andrew T. Faulkner [6]
Wendy Faulkner [6]Nadine Faulkner [5]Robert Faulkner [5]E. A. Faulkner [5]

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Paul Faulkner
University of Sheffield
  1.  28
    Knowledge on Trust.Paul Faulkner - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Paul Faulkner presents a new theory of testimony - the basis of much of what we know. He addresses the questions of what makes it reasonable to accept a piece of testimony, and what warrants belief formed on that basis. He rejects rival theories and argues that testimonial knowledge and testimonially warranted belief are based on trust.
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  2. On Telling and Trusting.Paul Faulkner - 2007 - Mind 116 (464):875-902.
    A key debate in the epistemology of testimony concerns when it is reasonable to acquire belief through accepting what a speaker says. This debate has been largely understood as the debate over how much, or little, assessment and monitoring an audience must engage in. When it is understood in this way the debate simply ignores the relationship speaker and audience can have. Interlocutors rarely adopt the detached approach to communication implied by talk of assessment and monitoring. Audiences trust speakers to (...)
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  3. The Philosophy of Trust.Paul Faulkner & Thomas W. Simpson (eds.) - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
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  4. The Social Character of Testimonial Knowledge.Paul Faulkner - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (11):581-601.
    Through communication, we form beliefs about the world, its history, others and ourselves. A vast proportion of these beliefs we count as knowledge. We seem to possess this knowledge only because it has been communicated. If those justifications that depended on communication were outlawed, all that would remain would be body of illsupported prejudice. The recognition of our ineradicable dependence on testimony for much of what we take ourselves to know has suggested to many that an epistemological account of testimony (...)
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  5. The Attitude of Trust is Basic.Paul Faulkner - 2015 - Analysis 75 (3):424-429.
    Most philosophical discussion of trust focuses on the three-place trust predicate: X trusting Y to φ. This article argues that it is the one-place and two-place predicates – X is trusting, and X trusting Y – that are fundamental.
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  6.  27
    Memory and Mystery: The Cultural Selection of Minimally Counterintuitive Narratives.Ara Norenzayan, Scott Atran, Jason Faulkner & Mark Schaller - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (3):531-553.
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  7. What Is Wrong with Lying?Paul Faulkner - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):535-557.
    One thing wrong with lying is that it can be manipulative. Understanding why lying can be a form of manipulation involves understanding how our telling someone something can give them a reason to believe it, and understanding this requires seeing both how our telling things can invite trust and how trust can be a reason to believe someone. This paper aims to outline the mechanism by means of which lies can be manipulative and through doing so identify a unique reason (...)
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  8. A Genealogy of Trust.Paul Faulkner - 2007 - Episteme 4 (3):305-321.
    In trusting a speaker we adopt a credulous attitude, and this attitude is basic: it cannot be reduced to the belief that the speaker is trustworthy or reliable. However, like this belief, the attitude of trust provides a reason for accepting what a speaker says. Similarly, this reason can be good or bad; it is likewise epistemically evaluable. This paper aims to present these claims and offer a genealogical justification of them.
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  9. The Practical Rationality of Trust.Paul Faulkner - 2014 - Synthese 191 (9).
    Most action can be explained in Humean or teleological terms; that is, in most cases, one can explain why someone acted by reference to that person’s beliefs and desires. However, trusting and being trustworthy are actions that do not permit such explanation. The action of trusting someone to do something is a matter of expecting someone to act for certain reasons, and acting trustworthily is one of acting for these reasons. It is better to say that people act out of (...)
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  10.  3
    Don’T Walk So Close to Me: Physical Distancing and Adult Physical Activity in Canada.Katie M. Di Sebastiano, Tala Chulak-Bozzer, Leigh M. Vanderloo & Guy Faulkner - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  11. The Moral Obligations of Trust.Paul Faulkner - 2014 - Philosophical Explorations 17 (3):332-345.
    Moral obligation, Darwall argues, is irreducibly second personal. So too, McMyler argues, is the reason for belief supplied by testimony and which supports trust. In this paper, I follow Darwall in arguing that the testimony is not second personal ?all the way down?. However, I go on to argue, this shows that trust is not fully second personal, which in turn shows that moral obligation is equally not second personal ?all the way down?
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  12. On the Rationality of Our Response to Testimony.P. Faulkner - 2002 - Synthese 131 (3):353-370.
    The assumption that we largely lack reasons for accepting testimony has dominated its epistemology. Given the further assumption that whatever reasons we do have are insufficient to justify our testimonial beliefs, many conclude that any account of testimonial knowledge must allow credulity to be justified. In this paper I argue that both of these assumptions are false. Our responses to testimony are guided by our background beliefs as to the testimony as a type, the testimonial situation, the testifier's character and (...)
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  13. Norms of Trust.Paul Faulkner - 2010 - In Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Social Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    Should we tell other people the truth? Should we believe what other people tell us? This paper argues that something like these norms of truth-telling and belief govern our production and receipt of testimony in conversational contexts. It then attempts to articulate these norms and determine their justification. More fully specified these norms prescribe that speakers tell the truth informatively, or be trustworthy, and that audiences presume that speakers do this, or trust. These norms of trust, as norms of conversational (...)
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  14. Lying and Deceit.Paul Faulkner - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  15.  5
    Generation of Random Sequences by Human Subjects: Cognitive Operations or Psychological Process?Michel Treisman & Andrew Faulkner - 1987 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 116 (4):337-355.
  16.  22
    The Nature and Rationality of Conversion.Paul Faulkner - 2019 - European Journal of Philosophy 27 (4):821-836.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  17.  73
    Good Knowledge, Bad Knowledge.Paul Faulkner - 2003 - Mind 112 (446):346-349.
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  18. David Hume's Reductionist Epistemology of Testimony.Paul Faulkner - 1998 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 79 (4):302–313.
    David Hume advances a reductionist epistemology of testimony: testimonial beliefs are justified on the basis of beliefs formed from other sources. This reduction, however, has been misunderstood. Testimonial beliefs are not justified in a manner identical to ordinary empirical beliefs; it is true, they are justified by observation of the conjunction between testimony and its truth, it is the nature of the conjunctions that has been misunderstood. The observation of these conjunctions provides us with our knowledge of human nature and (...)
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  19.  54
    Thinking About Knowing.Paul Faulkner - 2004 - Mind 113 (450):390-394.
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  20. ‘Nuts and Bolts and People’ Gender Troubled Engineering Identities.Wendy Faulkner - 2015 - In Byron Newberry, Carl Mitcham, Martin Meganck, Andrew Jamison, Christelle Didier & Steen Hyldgaard Christensen (eds.), Engineering Identities, Epistemologies and Values. Springer Verlag.
  21.  19
    Settler-Colonialism’s “Miscarriage”.Joanne Faulkner - 2019 - Angelaki 24 (3):137-154.
    The relation between Australia’s First Nations peoples and settler-colonial Australians may be characterised as having “miscarried” to the extent that colonial difference is unacknowledged,...
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  22.  72
    Collective Testimony and Collective Knowledge.Paul Faulkner - 2018 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 5.
    Testimony is a source of knowledge. On many occasions, the explanation of one’s knowing that p is that a speaker, S, told one that p. Our testimonial sources—the referents of ‘S’—can be other individuals, and they can be collectives; that is, in addition to learning from individuals, we learn things from committees, commissions, councils, clubs, teams, research groups, departments, administrations, churches, states and other social groups. North Korea might make a declaration about its missile programme, the church about the ordination (...)
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  23.  13
    What Are We Doing When We Are Training?Paul Faulkner - 2019 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (3-4):348-362.
    ABSTRACTAmateur and professional sportspersons, Bernard Suits proposed, are differentiated by their attitude towards their sport. For the amateur, competition is a game done for its own sake, while...
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  24.  67
    A Virtue Theory of Testimony.Paul Faulkner - 2014 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 114 (2pt2):189-211.
    This paper aims to outline, evaluate, and ultimately reject a virtue epistemic theory of testimony before proposing a virtue ethical theory. Trust and trustworthiness, it is proposed, are ethical virtues; and from these ethical virtues, epistemic consequences follow.
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  25.  60
    Culturing Cells, Reproducing and Regulating the Self.Julie Kent, Alex Faulkner, Ingrid Geesink & David Fitzpatrick - 2006 - Body and Society 12 (2):1-23.
    The emergence of a new tissue economy raises issues for the governance of risk and concepts of the body and self. This article explores the development of autologous cell therapies as a form of tissue engineering and considers how and why autologous applications are seen as less risky and more socially and politically acceptable. In a careful analysis of contemporary debates around the need for new international policies to regulate these technologies, we critically assess the discursive strategies employed to support (...)
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  26.  25
    Losing the Rose Tinted Glasses: Neural Substrates of Unbiased Belief Updating in Depression.Neil Garrett, Tali Sharot, Paul Faulkner, Christoph W. Korn, Jonathan P. Roiser & Raymond J. Dolan - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  27. Understanding Knowledge Transmission.Paul Faulkner - 2006 - Ratio 19 (2):156–175.
    We must allow that knowledge can be transmitted. But to allow this is to allow that an individual can know a proposition despite lacking any evidence for it and reaching belief by an unreliable means. So some explanation is required as to how knowledge rather than belief is transmitted. This paper considers two non-individualistic explanations: one in terms of knowledge existing autonomously, the other in terms of it existing as a property of communities. And it attempts to decide what is (...)
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  28. Conceptualizing Knowledge Used in Innovation: A Second Look at the Science-Technology Distinction and Industrial Innovation.Wendy Faulkner - 1994 - Science, Technology and Human Values 19 (4):425-458.
    This article reviews empirical and conceptual material from two distinct research traditions: on the science-technology relation and on industrial innovation. It aims both to shed new light on an old debate—the distinction between scientific and technological knowledge—and to refine our conceptualizations of the knowledge used by companies in the course of research and development leading to innovation. On the basis of three empirical studies, a composite categorization of different types of knowledge used in innovation is proposed, as part of a (...)
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  29.  25
    Indirect Communication, Authority, and Proclamation as a Normative Power.Christopher Bennett, Paul Faulkner & Robert Stern - 2019 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 40 (1):147-179.
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  30.  15
    Stretching and Challenging the Boundaries of Law: Varieties of Knowledge in Biotechnologies Regulation.Alex Faulkner & Lonneke Poort - 2017 - Minerva 55 (2):209-228.
    The paper addresses the question of adaptation of existing regulatory frameworks in the face of innovation in biotechnologies, and specifically the roles played in this by various expert knowledge practices. We identify two overlapping ideal types of adaptation: first, the stretching and maintenance of a pre-existing legal framework, and second, a breaking of existing classifications and establishment of a novel regime. We approach this issue by focusing on varieties of regulatory knowledge which, contributing to and parting of political legitimacy, in (...)
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  31.  19
    Innocence, Evil, and Human Frailty: Potentiality and the Child in the Writings of Giorgio Agamben.Joanne Faulkner - 2010 - Angelaki 15 (2):203-219.
    With his concept of ‘potentiality,’ Agamben offers a promising means of approaching questions of power and agency. Yet arguably, by situating potentiality as a reserve created through the sovereign ban, Agamben neglects the inter-subjective context of ordinary everyday agency. This means that while Agamben’s theory is particularly well suited to the analysis of interactions between states and their citizens, and those excluded from citizenship, it provides poor tools for understanding how social disparity develops within communities, understood as networks of individuals (...)
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  32.  74
    Giving the Benefit of the Doubt.Paul Faulkner - 2018 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 26 (2):139-155.
    Faced with evidence that what a person said is false, we can nevertheless trust them and so believe what they say – choosing to give them the benefit of the doubt. This is particularly notable when the person is a friend, or someone we are close to. Towards such persons, we demonstrate a remarkable epistemic partiality. We can trust, and so believe, our friends even when the balance of the evidence suggests that what they tell us is false. And insofar (...)
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  33.  39
    The Decoupling of "Explicit" and "Implicit" Processing in Neuropsychological Disorders: Insights Into the Neural Basis of Consciousness?Deborah Faulkner & Jonathan K. Foster - 2002 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 8.
    A key element of the distinction between explicit and implicit cognitive functioning is the presence or absence of conscious awareness. In this review, we consider the proposal that neuropsychological disorders can best be considered in terms of a decoupling between preserved implicit or unconscious processing and impaired explicit or conscious processing. Evidence for dissociations between implicit and explicit processes in blindsight, amnesia, object agnosia, prosopagnosia, hemi-neglect, and aphasia is examined. The implications of these findings for a) our understanding of a (...)
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  34.  30
    Communicating Your Point of View.Paul Faulkner - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):661-675.
    European Journal of Philosophy, Volume 30, Issue 2, Page 661-675, June 2022.
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  35.  16
    Negotiating Vulnerability Through “Animal” and “Child”: Agamben and Rancière at the Limit of Being Human.Joanne Faulkner - 2011 - Angelaki 16 (4):73-85.
    While ethics and justice are domains that concern the human, this paper argues that these spheres are organized and given meaning in terms of what lies at the limits of the human subject: children and non-human animals. In this respect, the orientation to ethical life takes the form of a disavowal: in the attempt to negotiate human vulnerability, a subjectivity that defines itself in terms of the control of nature displaces its fragility onto children and animals. In the face of (...)
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  36.  35
    Innocence, Evil, and Human Frailty: Potentiality and the Child in the Writings of Giorgio Agamben.Joanne Faulkner - 2010 - Angelaki 15 (2):203-219.
  37.  14
    Negotiating Vulnerability Through “Animal” and “Child”: Agamben and Rancière at the Limit of Being Human.Joanne Faulkner - 2011 - Angelaki 16 (4):73 - 85.
    Angelaki, Volume 16, Issue 4, Page 73-85, December 2011.
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  38.  2
    Francis Bacon and the Project of Progress.Robert K. Faulkner - 1993 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    'The book is clearly written and makes available a wide range of issues concerning the style of Bacon's writings and his politics. Highly recommended to both general and academic libraries at all levels.'-CHOICE.
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  39.  29
    Innocents and Oracles: The Child as a Figure of Knowledge and Critique in the Middle-Class Philosophical Imagination.Joanne Faulkner - 2011 - Critical Horizons 12 (3):323 - 346.
    This paper argues that the figure of the child performs a critical function for the middle-class social imaginary, representing both an essential “innocence” of the liberal individual, and an excluded, unconscious remainder of its project of control through the management of knowledge. While childhood is invested with affect and value, children’s agency and opportunities for social participation are restricted insofar as they are seen both to represent an elementary humanity and to fall short of full rationality, citizenship and identity. The (...)
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  40.  59
    The Exchange of Words.Paul Faulkner - 2021 - Philosophical Review 130 (1):167-171.
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  41.  1
    The Power and the Pleasure? A Research Agenda for “Making Gender Stick” to Engineers.Wendy Faulkner - 2000 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 25 (1):87-119.
    This article seeks to open up a new avenue for feminist technology studies—gender-aware research on engineers and engineering practice—on the grounds that engineers are powerful symbols of the equation between masculinity and technology and occupy significant roles in shaping new technologies. Drawing on the disparate evidence available, the author explores four themes. The first asks why the equation between masculinity and technology is so durable when there are such huge mismatches between image and practice. The second examines this mismatch in (...)
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  42.  6
    Calculation of Stored Energy From Broadening of X-Ray Diffraction Lines.E. A. Faulkner - 1960 - Philosophical Magazine 5 (53):519-521.
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  43. Really Trying or Merely Trying.Paul Faulkner - 2014 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (3):363-380.
    We enjoy first-person authority with respect to a certain class of actions: for these actions, we know what we are doing just because we are doing it. This paper first formulates an epistemological principle that captures this authority in terms of trying to act in a way that one has the capacity to act. It then considers a case of effortful action – running a middle distance race – that threatens this principle. And proposes the solution of changing the metaphysics (...)
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  44. Wittgenstein's Philosophical Grammar: A Neglected Discussion of Vagueness.Nadine Faulkner - 2010 - Philosophical Investigations 33 (2):159-183.
    In this paper I explore a neglected discussion of vagueness put forward by Wittgenstein in his Philosophical Grammar (1932–34). In this work, unlike Philosophical Investigations (1953), Wittgenstein not only discusses the venerable Sorites paradox but provides a novel conception of vagueness using an analogy with coin tossing and converging intervals. As he sees it, the problematic picture of vagueness arises because we conflate aspects of the functioning of vague concepts with those of non-vague ones. Thus, while we accept that vague (...)
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  45.  7
    Ethics, Evidence Based Sports Medicine, and the Use of Platelet Rich Plasma in the English Premier League.M. J. McNamee, C. M. Coveney, A. Faulkner & J. Gabe - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (4):344-361.
    The use of platelet rich plasma as a novel treatment is discussed in the context of a qualitative research study comprising 38 interviews with sports medicine practitioners and other stakeholders working within the English Premier League during the 2013–16 seasons. Analysis of the data produced several overarching themes: conservatism versus experimentalism in medical attitudes; therapy perspectives divergence; conflicting versions of appropriate evidence; subcultures; community beliefs/practices; and negotiation of medical decision-making. The contested evidence base for the efficacy of PRP is presented (...)
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  46. Understanding Psychoanalysis.Matthew Sharpe & Joanne Faulkner - 2008 - Routledge.
    "Understanding Psychoanalysis" presents a broad introduction to the key concepts and developments in psychoanalysis and its impact on modern thought. Charting pivotal moments in the theorization and reception of psychoanalysis, the book provides a comprehensive account of the concerns and development of Freud's work, as well as his most prominent successors, Melanie Klein and Jacques Lacan.The work of these leading psychoanalytic theorists has greatly influenced thinking across other disciplines, notably feminism, film studies, poststructuralism, social and cultural theory, the philosophy of (...)
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  47. Two-Stage Reliabilism, Virtue Reliabilism, Dualism and the Problem of Sufficiency.Paul Faulkner - 2013 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (8):121-138.
    Social epistemology should be truth-centred, argues Goldman. Social epistemology should capture the ‘logic of everyday practices’ and describe socially ‘situated’ reasoning, says Fuller. Starting from Goldman’s vision of epistemology, this paper aims to argue for Fuller’s contention. Social epistemology cannot focus solely on the truth because the truth can be got in lucky ways. The same too could be said for reliability. Adding a second layer of epistemic evaluation helps only insofar as the reasons thus specified are appropriately connected to (...)
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  48.  26
    A Core Ontology for Requirements.Ivan J. Jureta, John Mylopoulos & Stéphane Faulkner - 2009 - Applied ontology 4 (3):169-244.
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  49. On Dreaming and Being Lied To.Paul Faulkner - 2006 - Episteme 2 (3):149-159.
    As sources of knowledge, perception and testimony are both vulnerable to sceptical arguments. To both arguments a Moorean response is possible: both can be refuted by reference to particular things known by perception and testimony. However, lies and dreams are different possibilities and they are different in a way that undercuts the plausibility of a Moorean response to a scepticism of testimony. The condition placed on testimonial knowledge cannot be trivially satisfied in the way the Moorean would suggest. This has (...)
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  50.  59
    Relativism and Our Warrant for Scientific Theories.Paul Faulkner - 2004 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (3):259 – 269.
    We depend upon the community for justified belief in scientific theory. This dependence can suggest that our individual belief in scientific theory is justified because the community believes it to be justified. This idea is at the heart of an anti-realist epistemology according to which there are no facts about justification that transcend a community's judgement thereof. Ultimately, knowledge and justified belief are simply social statuses. When conjoined with the lemma that communities can differ in what they accept as justified, (...)
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