Results for 'Aegina'

24 found
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  1.  18
    Augustus on Aegina.G. W. Bowersock - 1964 - Classical Quarterly 14 (1):120-121.
    [Plutarch] records that Augustus passed a winter on the island of Aegina, rather than in Athens, as a sign of his wrath toward the Athenians. Paul Graindor assumed that the most likely time for Augustus to have been angry with the Athenians was immediately after Actium, and so he dated [Plutarch]'s anecdote to the winter of 31/30. This is impossible.
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  2.  12
    The “Rough Stones” of Aegina: Pindar, Pausanias, and the Topography of Aeginetan Justice.Leslie Kurke - 2017 - Classical Antiquity 36 (2):236-287.
    This paper considers Pindar's diverse appropriations of elements of the sacred topography of Aegina for different purposes in epinikia composed for Aeginetan victors. It focuses on poems likely performed in the vicinity of the Aiakeion for their different mobilizations of a monument that we know from Pausanias stood beside the Aiakeion—the tomb of Phokos, an earth mound topped with the “rough stone” that killed him. The more speculative final part of the paper suggests that it may also be possible (...)
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  3.  10
    The "Rough Stones" of Aegina: Pindar, Pausanias, and the Topography of Aeginetan Justice.L. Kurke - 2017 - Classical Antiquity Recent Issues 36 (2):236-287.
    This paper considers Pindar's diverse appropriations of elements of the sacred topography of Aegina for different purposes in epinikia composed for Aeginetan victors. It focuses on poems likely performed in the vicinity of the Aiakeion for their different mobilizations of a monument that we know from Pausanias stood beside the Aiakeion—the tomb of Phokos, an earth mound topped with the "rough stone" that killed him. The more speculative final part of the paper suggests that it may also be possible (...)
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  4.  30
    Ig IV 2: AEGINA (K.) Hallof (Ed.) Inscriptiones Graecae, Vol IV: Inscriptiones Argolidis [Editio Altera], Fasc. 2: Inscriptiones Aeginae Insulae. Pp. Xii + 200, Map, Pls. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2007. Paper, €248, US$ 397. ISBN: 978-3-11-019522-. [REVIEW]Peter Thonemann - 2008 - The Classical Review 58 (2):506-.
  5.  7
    A Gold Diadem From Aegina.Reynold Higgins - 1987 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 107:182.
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  6.  4
    The Dating of the Aegina Pediments.Robert Manuel Cook - 1974 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 94:171.
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  7.  5
    A Textual Note on Paul of Aegina, Pragmateia 6.88.Aileen R. Das - 2014 - Classical Quarterly 64 (2):868-870.
    Paul of Aegina's Pragmateiais the only extant Greek medical text from antiquity that discusses the extraction of arrows and small missiles. In his book on surgery, Paul details how to extract arrows according to their properties and the parts of the body which they have wounded. He prefaces his instructions by describing how arrows differ in their material, figure, size, number, mode, and power. Paul's account of arrow varieties appears to reflect the environment of his medical practice, seventh-century Alexandria, (...)
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  8.  1
    Mental Illness in Ancient Medicine: From Celsus to Paul of Aegina.Chiara Thumiger & Peter N. Singer (eds.) - 2018 - Studies in Ancient Medicine.
    Mental Illness in Ancient Medicine: From Celsus to Paul of Aeginatraces the history of conceptions of mental disorder in Graeco-Roman medical writings, from the 1st century BCE to the 7th CE, with detailed studies of all significant authors.
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  9. Review: Furtwängler's Excavations in Aegina[REVIEW]P. Gardner - 1906 - The Classical Review 20 (6):327-330.
  10.  9
    Herodotus on the Early Hostilities Between Aegina and Athens.Thomas Figueira - 1985 - American Journal of Philology 106 (1):49-74.
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  11.  8
    Gauss W. And Kiriatzi E. With Contributions by Georgakopoulou M., Pentedeka A., Lis B., Whitbread I.K. And Iliopoulos Y. Pottery Production and Supply at Bronze Age Kolonna, Aegina. An Integrated Archaeological and Scientific Study of a Ceramic Landscape (Contributions to the Chronology of the Eastern Mediterranean 27; Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften. Denkschriften der Gesamtakademie 65). Vienna: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2011. Pp. 527. €192. 9783700168010. [REVIEW]Ann-Louise Schallin - 2013 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 133:255-256.
  12.  7
    Review: [Die Aegineten: die Marmorskulpturen des Tempels der Aphaia auf Aegina. Ein Katalog der Glyptothek München. 1. Die Ostgiebelgruppe]. [REVIEW]Martin Robertson - 1978 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 98:208-210.
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  13.  4
    Genealogies and Politics: Phocus on the Road.Elena Franchi - 2017 - Klio 99 (1):1-25.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Klio Jahrgang: 99 Heft: 1 Seiten: 1-25.
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  14. Medieval Minds: Mental Health in the Middle Ages.Thomas F. Graham & Robert B. MacLeod - 1967 - Routledge.
    Originally published in 1967 Medieval Minds looks at the Middle Ages as a period with changing attitudes towards mental health and its treatment. The book argues that it was a period that that bridged the ancient with the modern, ignorance with knowledge and superstition with science. The Middle Ages spanned almost a millennium in the history of the humanities and provided the people of this period with the benefit of this knowledge. The book looks at the promise and progress which (...)
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  15.  7
    Euclid’s Book on Divisions of Figures: A Conjecture as to its Origin.David Aboav - 2008 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 62 (6):603-612.
    It is shown how a diagram on the reverse of a Greek coin of Aegina of the fifth century b.c.e., is simply constructed with the help of Proposition 36 of Euclid’s Book on Divisions [of Figures], and it is conjectured in the absence of contemporary evidence that, since Euclid expressly designated this proposition to be the last in the book, he may have had in mind the diagram, which, some 200 years after its appearance on the coinage, may still (...)
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  16.  1
    Pre-Euclidean Geometry and Aeginetan Coin Design: Some Further Remarks.Gerhard Michael Ambrosi - 2012 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 66 (5):557-583.
    Some ancient Greek coins from the island state of Aegina depict peculiar geometric designs. Hitherto they have been interpreted as anticipations of some Euclidean propositions. But this paper proposes geometrical constructions which establish connections to pre-Euclidean treatments of incommensurability. The earlier Aeginetan coin design from about 500 bc onwards appears as an attempt not only to deal with incommensurability but also to conceal it. It might be related to Plato’s dialogue Timaeus. The newer design from 404 bc onwards reveals (...)
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  17.  12
    The Parisinus Graecus 2293 as a Document of Scientific Activity in Swabian Sicily.Peter E. Pormann - 2003 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (1):137-161.
    The production of manuscripts can be an indication for the scientific, linguistic or medical interests of a community. In this paper the author argues that Parisinus Graecus 2293, a bilingual Greek-Arabic manuscript, containing parts of the first three books of Paul of Aegina's medical encyclopaedia, was produced in Sicily or Southern Italy, probably in Palermo during the reign of the Hohenstaufen. It is thus a testimony to the fervent scientific and medical interest of the Swabian court which promoted cultural (...)
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  18.  9
    Cleombrotus of Ambracia: Interpretations of a Suicide From Callimachus to Agathias.G. D. Williams - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (1):154-169.
    At Phaedo 59b Echecrates asks Phaedo who was present on the day when Socrates drank the hemlock in prison. Various Athenians are named, then various foreigners, but when Echecrates subsequently asks if two other foreigners, Aristippus and Cleombrotus, were present, Phaedo replies that they were said to be in Aegina. After this fleeting reference to Cleombrotus, Plato does not mention him again in the Phaedo or any other dialogue; and yet in later antiquity a certain Cleombrotus of Ambracia rose (...)
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  19.  15
    The Date of Pindar's Fifth Nemean and Bacchylides' Thirteenth Ode.Ilja Leonard Pfeijffer - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (02):318-.
    Just about every odd year in the early fifth century B.C. has been proposed as the date of the Nemean victory of Pytheas from Aegina, celebrated in Pindar's Fifth Nemean and Bacchylides' thirteenth ode. Scholars have attempted to date both odes with the help of Isthmian 6 and 5, which celebrate victories of a member of the same family and the latter of which at 48ff. refers to Salamis as a recent event. Various interpretations of the victory catalogues in (...)
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  20.  1
    Tracing Tradition. The Idea of Cancerous Contagiousness From Renaissance to Enlightenment.Daniel Droixhe - 2020 - History of European Ideas 46 (6):754-765.
    ABSTRACT This paper is concerned with landmarks in the history of the idea of cancerous contagiousness from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment. The origins of the idea of cancerous contagiousness is considered on the basis of Galen’s distinction between scabiesleprosy, cancer and elephantiasis. Paul of Aegina established the association between these latter diseases. In the fourteenth century, a ‘new line of inquiry’ developed concerning the transmission of diseases like plague, and G. Fracastoro applied this approach by stating that putrefaction (...)
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  21.  12
    Cleombrotus of Ambracia: Interpretations of a Suicide From Callimachus to Agathias.G. D. Williams - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (01):154-.
    At Phaedo 59b Echecrates asks Phaedo who was present on the day when Socrates drank the hemlock in prison. Various Athenians are named , then various foreigners , but when Echecrates subsequently asks if two other foreigners, Aristippus and Cleombrotus, were present, Phaedo replies that they were said to be in Aegina . After this fleeting reference to Cleombrotus, Plato does not mention him again in the Phaedo or any other dialogue; and yet in later antiquity a certain Cleombrotus (...)
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  22.  13
    Eau de Cleopatra: Mendesian Perfume and Tell Timai.Robert Littman, Jay Silverstein, Dora Goldsmith, Sean Coughlin & Hamedy Mashaly - 2021 - Near Eastern Archaeology 84 (3):216-229.
    Cleopatra VII, the last of the Ptolemaic rulers of Egypt, reveled in perfume (Plutarch, Life of Marcus Antonius 26.2). She even used it in her seduction of the Roman general Marc Antony. Sailing up the river Cydnus to meet him, she reclined in a canopy spangled with gold, adorned like Venus in a painting. Boys dressed as cupids fanned her and wondrous scents from incense offerings wafted along the riverbanks. Not long after her death in August 30 BCE, a book (...)
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  23.  15
    The Broken Wall, the Burning Roof and Tower: Pindar, Ol. 8.31–46. E. Robbins - 1986 - Classical Quarterly 36 (2):317-321.
    In the Eighth Olympian, for Alcimedon of Aegina, Pindar recounts a story that, according to a notice in the scholia, is not found in earlier Greek literature. Aeacus was summoned from Aegina to Troy by Apollo and Poseidon to help in the construction of the city's fortifications. Smoke, says the poet, would one day rise from the very battlements Aeacus built. The wall newly completed, a portent appeared: three snakes tried to scale the ramparts but two fell to (...)
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  24. Athenaeus of Attalia on the Psychological Causes of Bodily Health.Sean Coughlin - 2018 - In Chiara Thumiger & P. N. Singer (eds.), Mental Illness in Ancient Medicine: From Celsus to Paul of Aegina. Leiden: Brill. pp. 107-142.
    Athenaeus of Attalia distinguishes two types of exercise or training (γυμνασία) that are required at each stage of life: training of the body and training of the soul. He says that training of the body includes activities like physical exercises, eating, drinking, bathing and sleep. Training of the soul, on the other hand, consists of thinking, education, and emotional regulation (in other words, 'philosophy'). The notion of 'training of the soul' and the contrast between 'bodily' and 'psychic' exercise is common (...)
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