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  1. Games as Pastimes in Suits’s Utopia: Meaningful Living and the “Metaphysics of Leisure”.M. Andrew Holowchak - 2007 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 34 (1):88-96.
  • Game as Paradox: A Rebuttal of Suits.David Myers - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (1):155-168.
    Here I examine Bernard Suits?s definition of games and explain why that definition is in need of reference to representation or, put more generally, to semiosis. And, once admitting the necessity of the representational in games, Suits?s definition must also then admit the essential paradoxy of games.
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  • John Tasioulas.John Tasioulas - 2006 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):237–264.
  • Games and the Good.Thomas Hurka - 2006 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (1):217-235.
    Using Bernard Suits’s brilliant analysis (contra Wittgenstein) of playing a game, this paper examines the intrinsic value of game-playing. It argues that two elements in Suits’s analysis make success in games difficult, which is one ground of value, while a third involves choosing a good activity for the property that makes it good, which is a further ground. The paper concludes by arguing that game-playing is the paradigm modern (Marx, Nietzsche) as against classical (Aristotle) value: since its goal is intrinsically (...)
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  • Categories of Art.Kendall L. Walton - 1970 - Philosophical Review 79 (3):334-367.
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  • Utopia is Intelligible and Game-Playing is What Makes Utopia Intelligible.Deborah P. Vossen - 2016 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 43 (2):251-265.
    Via the existential questioning outlook supplied by the Grasshopper’s three visions as relevant to the fate of humankind – oblivion, delusion, and really magnificent games – this article seeks to alleviate some of the ambiguity surrounding Bernard Suits’ provocative claim that Utopian existence is fundamentally concerned with game-playing. Specifically, after proposing an interpretation of Suits’ parable designed to enrich the logical intelligibility of his Utopian thesis, I advance the suggestion that the Grasshopper’s picture of people playing really magnificent games is (...)
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  • Video Games as Self‐Involving Interactive Fictions.Jon Robson & Aaron Meskin - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):165-177.
    This article explores the nature and theoretical import of a hitherto neglected class of fictions which we term ‘self-involving interactive fictions’. SIIFs are interactive fictions, but they differ from standard examples of interactive fictions by being, in some important sense, about those who consume them. In order to better understand the nature of SIIFs, and the ways in which they differ from other fictions, we focus primarily on the most prominent example of the category: video-game fictions. We argue that appreciating (...)
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  • Video Games and Imaginative Identification.Stephanie Patridge - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (2):181-184.
  • The Force of Truth1.Alex Blum - 2011 - Philosophical Investigations 34 (4):393-395.
    The theme of the paper is that what is true cannot be false and conversely. This position was anticipated by Aristotle in De Interpretatione and by G. H. von Wright. The latter calls it “a truth of the logic of relative modalities.”Aristotle has been taken to task by Susan Haack and others for arguing fallaciously from the Principle of Bivalence, that every statement is either true or false, to fatalism. The implication holds, but we show that it is unreasonable to (...)
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  • Video Games as Self-Involving Interactive Fictions.Jon Robson & Aaron Meskin - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):165-177.
    This article explores the nature and theoretical import of a hitherto neglected class of fictions which we term ‘self-involving interactive fictions’. SIIFs are interactive fictions, but they differ from standard examples of interactive fictions by being, in some important sense, about those who consume them. In order to better understand the nature of SIIFs, and the ways in which they differ from other fictions, we focus primarily on the most prominent example of the category: video-game fictions. We argue that appreciating (...)
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  • Sport and Utopia.Keith Thompson - 2004 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 31 (1):60-63.
  • The Intelligibility of Suits’s Utopia: The View From Anthropological Philosophy.R. Scott Kretchmar - 2006 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 33 (1):67-77.
  • Triad Trickery: Playing With Sport and Games.Klaus V. Meier - 1988 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 15 (1):11-30.
  • Gaming Up Life: Considerations for Game Expansions.Scott Kretchmar - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (2):142-155.
  • The Paper World of Bernard Suits.Allan Bäck - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (2):156-174.
  • Game-Playing Without Rule-Following.A. J. Kreider - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (1):55-73.
  • Sprints, Sports, and Suits.Mitchell N. Berman - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (1):163-176.
    Philosophy of sport orthodoxy maintains the following three theses: (1) all sports (or all refereed sports) are games; (2) games are as Suits defined them; and (3) sprints are sports. This article argues that these three theses cannot be jointly maintained and offers exploratory thoughts regarding what might follow.
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  • Are Video Games Art?Aaron Smuts - 2005 - Contemporary Aesthetics 3.
    I argue that by any major definition of art many modern video games should be considered art. Rather than defining art and defending video games based on a single contentious definition, I offer reasons for thinking that video games can be art according to historical, aesthetic, institutional, representational and expressive theories of art. Overall, I argue that while many video games probably should not be considered art, there are good reasons to think that some video games should be classified as (...)
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  • Historical Narratives and the Philosophy of Art.Noel Carroll - 1993 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (3):313-326.
  • Art and the Aesthetic: A N Institutional Analysis.Kendall L. Walton - 1977 - Philosophical Review 86 (1):97.
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  • Performance Prestidigitation.Klaus V. Meier - 1989 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 16 (1):13-33.
  • The Paradoxes of Utopian Game-Playing.Deborah P. Vossen - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):315-328.
    In The Grasshopper: Games, Life, and Utopia, Suits maintains the following two theses: game-playing is defined as ‘activity directed towards bringing about a specific state of affairs, using only means permitted by rules, where the rules prohibit more efficient in favour of less efficient means, and where such rules are accepted just because they make possible such activity’ and ‘game playing is what makes Utopia intelligible.’ Observing that these two theses cannot be jointly maintained absent paradox, this essay explores the (...)
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  • Games as Pastimes in Suits’s Utopia: Meaningful Living and the “Metaphysics of Leisure”.M. Andrew Holowchak - 2007 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 34 (1):88-96.
  • On Beautiful Games.R. Scott Kretchmar - 1989 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 16 (1):34-43.
  • Groundrules in the Philosophy of Art.Nick Zangwill - 1995 - Philosophy 70 (274):533 - 544.
    What are the groundrules in the philosophy of art? What criteria of adequacy should we use for assessing theories of art?
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  • The Grasshopper: Games, Life and Utopia.By Bernard Suits. Toronto, University of Toronto Press 1978.Robert J. Paddick - 1979 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 6 (1):73-78.
  • Pre-Lusory Goals for Games: A Gambit Declined.Angela J. Schneider & Robert B. Butcher - 1997 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 24 (1):38-46.
  • A Critique of Mr. Suits' Definition of Game Playing.Frank McBride - 1979 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 6 (1):59-65.
  • Books Received. [REVIEW][author unknown] - 2011 - Philosophical Investigations 34 (4):410-411.
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  • II—John Tasioulas.John Tasioulas - 2006 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):237-264.
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