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  1. Ideology and Utopia.Paul Arthur Schilpp - 1940 - Philosophical Review 49 (2):265-268.
    _Ideology and Utopia_ argues that ideologies are mental fictions whose function is to veil the true nature of a given society. They originate unconsciously in the minds of those who seek to stabilise a social order. Utopias are wish dreams that inspire the collective action of opposition groups which aim at the entire transformation of society. Mannheim shows these two opposing elements to dominate not only our social thought but even unexpectedly to penetrate into the most scientific theories in philosophy, (...)
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  • Utopianism and Education: The Legacy of Thomas More.David Halpin - 2001 - British Journal of Educational Studies 49 (3):299-315.
    'At the beginning, with Thomas More, utopia sets out an agenda for the modern world. Today, five hundred years later, what are the uses of utopia?'. This paper provides an answer to this question by examining More's utopian 'method' which, it is suggested, offers a model way of thinking imaginatively and prospectively about the form and content of social reform in general and educational change in particular.
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  • Envisioning Real Utopias, Erik Olin Wright, London: Verso, 2010.David F. Ruccio - 2011 - Historical Materialism 19 (4):219-227.
  • Anarchism, Utopias and Philosophy of Education.Judith Suissa - 2001 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (4):627–646.
  • Biopolitical Utopianism in Educational Theory.Tyson Lewis - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (7):683–702.
    In this paper I shift the center of utopian debates away from questions of ideology towards the question of power. As a new point of departure, I analyze Foucault's notion of biopower as well as Hardt and Negri's theory of biopolitics. Arguing for a new hermeneutic of biopolitics in education, I then apply this lens to evaluate the educational philosophy of John Dewey. In conclusion, the paper suggests that while Hardt and Negri are missing an educational theory, John Dewey is (...)
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  • Anarchism, Utopias and Philosophy of Education.Judith Suissa - 2001 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (4):627-646.
  • Utopia or Utopias in the Gaps: From the Political to the 'Domestic'.Michel Maffesoli - 2005 - Diogenes 52 (2):25-28.
    There is a question mark hanging over the two great markers of modern civilization in the so-called Judeo-Christian, or more accurately Semitic-western-modern tradition: monotheism is the first of these two great markers. The second is the Project, that is, the idea that real life is elsewhere, messianism. Life must be saved, healed. Based on this structural schizophrenia and this transcendent project can we talk about a humanism? Our western civilization has reached saturation point. This saturation is expressed in a polytheism (...)
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  • Against Prophecy and Utopia: Foucault and the Future.Mark G. E. Kelly - 2014 - Thesis Eleven 120 (1):104-118.
    In this essay, I take as a starting point Foucault’s rejection of two different ways of thinking about the future, prophecy and utopianism, and use this rejection as a basis for the elaboration of a more detailed rejection of them, invoking complexity-based epistemic limitations in relation to thinking about the future of political society. I follow Foucault in advocating immanent political struggle, which does not seek to build a determinate vision of the future but rather focuses on negating aspects of (...)
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  • Utopia with No Topos.Zygmunt Bauman - 2003 - History of the Human Sciences 16 (1):11-25.
    To measure the life `as it is' by a life `as it might or should be' is a defining, constitutive feature of humanity. The urge to transcend is nearest to a universal, and arguably the least destructible, attribute of human existence. This cannot be said, however, of its articulations into `projects' - that is, of cohesive and comprehensive programmes of change and of visions of life that the change is hoped to bring about - visions that stand out of reality, (...)
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  • Education: Not a Real Utopian Design.Jaime Ahlberg & Harry Brighouse - 2014 - Politics and Society 42 (1):51-72.
    This paper identifies four criteria, all of which an ideal real utopian proposal would meet. We argue for a moderate skepticism that it is possible to give a real utopian proposal to guide the design of education for a society that meets these criteria; both for the practical reason that what happens in schools depends on the background environment within which they operate, and for the principled reason that when educating children we should attend to their individual future well-being in (...)
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  • The Poverty of Historicism.Patrick Gardiner - 1959 - Philosophical Quarterly 9 (35):172-180.
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  • The Principle of Hope.Ronald Aronson - 1991 - History and Theory 30 (2):220.
  • Ivan Illich's Late Critique of Deschooling Society: “I Was Largely Barking Up the Wrong Tree”.Jon Igelmo Zaldívar Rosa Bruno‐jofré - 2012 - Educational Theory 62 (5):573-592.
    In this article, Rosa Bruno‐Jofré and Jon Igelmo Zaldívar examine Ivan Illich's own critique of Deschooling Society, and his subsequent revised critique of educational institutions and understanding of education, within the context of both his personal intellectual journey and the general epistemological shift that started to take shape in the early 1980s. Bruno‐Jofré and Zaldívar consider how, over time, Illich refocused his quest on examining the roots of modern certitudes and explored how human beings are integrated into the systems generated (...)
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  • Book Reviews. [REVIEW][author unknown] - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (2):300-303.
  • Book Reviews. [REVIEW][author unknown] - 2004 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 38 (2):297-300.
  • Espacio, Saber y Poder.Michel Foucault - 1984 - In The Foucault Reader.
    “ S pace, K no w l edge and P o w e r ” , en tr ev i s t a r ea l i z a d a en 1982 y pub li cada en P aul R ab i no w , The Foucau l t R eade r , N ueva Y o r k, 1984. A quí se pub li ca de acue r do a l a ve r s i ón f r (...)
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  • The Cards of Confusion: Reflections on Historical Communism and the 'End of History'.Gregory Elliott - 1993 - Radical Philosophy 64.
     
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  • Utopianism.Krishan Kumar - 1991 - Utopian Studies 2 (1):212-215.
  • Picture Imperfect: Utopian Thought in an Anti-Utopian Age.Russell Jacoby - 2006 - Utopian Studies 17 (2):387-388.
  • The Reform of Utopia.Wayne Hudson - 2005 - Utopian Studies 16 (3):503-506.
    Wayne Hudson's Reform of Utopia is one of the most interesting of recent books. It challenges utopian-studies scholars because it poses some interesting questions, underlines unexplored points, and suggests new areas for research. Without doubt, it is a book that takes utopian thought seriously. In that line, The Reform of Utopia tries to remove some clichés about utopianism, bases its arguments on epistemology and ideology, and leaves history to one side. So, Hudson defends utopian thought against liberals since it is (...)
     
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