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  1. The Exemplification of Rules: An Appraisal of Pettit’s Approach to the Problem of Rule-Following.Daniel Watts - 2012 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (1):69-90.
    Abstract This paper offers an appraisal of Phillip Pettit's approach to the problem how a merely finite set of examples can serve to represent a determinate rule, given that indefinitely many rules can be extrapolated from any such set. I argue that Pettit's so-called ethnocentric theory of rule-following fails to deliver the solution to this problem he sets out to provide. More constructively, I consider what further provisions are needed in order to advance Pettit's general approach to the problem. I (...)
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  • Critique of the Power of Judgment.Hannah Ginsborg, Immanuel Kant, Paul Guyer & Eric Matthews - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):429.
    This new translation is an extremely welcome addition to the continuing Cambridge Edition of Kant’s works. English-speaking readers of the third Critique have long been hampered by the lack of an adequate translation of this important and difficult work. James Creed Meredith’s much-reprinted translation has charm and elegance, but it is often too loose to be useful for scholarly purposes. Moreover it does not include the first version of Kant’s introduction, the so-called “First Introduction,” which is now recognized as indispensable (...)
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  • The Paradoxical Rationality of Søren Kierkegaard.Richard Phillip McCombs - 2013 - Indiana University Press.
    Discusses Soren Kierkegaard's use of irrationality in his pseudonymous writings to bolster important truths about rationality.
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  • Nature and Divinity in Plato's Timaeus.Sarah Broadie - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's Timaeus is one of the most influential and challenging works of ancient philosophy to have come down to us. Sarah Broadie's rich and compelling study proposes new interpretations of major elements of the Timaeus, including the separate Demiurge, the cosmic 'beginning', the 'second mixing', the Receptacle and the Atlantis story. Broadie shows how Plato deploys the mythic themes of the Timaeus to convey fundamental philosophical insights and examines the profoundly differing methods of interpretation which have been brought to bear (...)
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  • Something About Kierkegaard.David F. Swenson - 1945 - Minneapolis, Augsburg Publishing House.
    Swenson's discovery of Kierkegaard for himself led him to resolve to devote his career to the task of making Kierkegaard available in translation to the ...
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  • Beyond the Limits of Thought.Graham Priest - 1995 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
    This is a philosophical investigation of the nature of the limits of thought. Drawing on recent developments in the field of logic, Graham Priest shows that the description of such limits leads to contradiction, and argues that these contradictions are in fact veridical. Beginning with an analysis of the way in which these limits arise in pre-Kantian philosophy, Priest goes on to illustrate how the nature of these limits was theorised by Kant and Hegel. He offers new interpretations of Berkeley's (...)
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  • Kierkegaard and the Art of Irony.Roy Martinez - 2001 - Humanity Books.
  • Humour and Irony in Kierkegaard’s Thought.John Lippitt - 2000 - St. Martin's Press.
    Irony, humor and the comic play vital yet under-appreciated roles in Kierkegaard's thought. Focusing upon the Concluding Unscientific Postscript , this book investigates these roles, relating irony and humor as forms of the comic to central Kierkegaardian themes. How does the comic function as a form of "indirect communication"? What roles can irony and humor play in the infamous Kierkegaardian "leap"? Do certain forms of wisdom depend upon possessing a sense of humor? And is such a sense of humor thus (...)
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  • Kierkegaard and Socrates: A Study in Philosophy and Faith.Jacob Howland - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    This volume is a study of the relationship between philosophy and faith in Søren Kierkegaard's Philosophical Fragments. It is also the first book to examine the role of Socrates in this body of writings, illuminating the significance of Socrates for Kierkegaard's thought. Jacob Howland argues that in the Fragments, philosophy and faith are closely related passions. A careful examination of the role of Socrates demonstrates that Socratic, philosophical eros opens up a path to faith. At the same time, the work (...)
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  • Kierkegaard's Socratic Art.Benjamin Daise - 1999 - Mercer University Press.
    Based on the definitive English edition of Kierkegaard's works by Princeton University Press, this series of commentaries addresses all the published texts of ...
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  • The Encyclopaedia Logic, with the ZusŠTze: Part I of the Encyclopaedia of Philosophical Sciences with the Zusätze.Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (ed.) - 1991 - Indianapolis, IN, USA: Hackett Publishing Company.
    The appearance of this translation is a major event in English-language Hegel studies, for it is more than simply a replacement for Wallace's translation cum paraphrase. Hegel's Prefaces to each of the three editions of the Enzyklopädie are translated for the first time into English. There is a very detailed Introduction translating Hegel's German, which serves not only as a guide to the translator's usage but also to Hegel's. Also included are a detailed bilingual annotated glossary, very extensive bibliographic and (...)
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  • The Philosophy of Horror: Or, Paradoxes of the Heart.Noel Carroll - 1990 - Routledge.
    Noel Carroll, film scholar and philosopher, offers the first serious look at the aesthetics of horror. In this book he discusses the nature and narrative structures of the genre, dealing with horror as a "transmedia" phenomenon. A fan and serious student of the horror genre, Carroll brings to bear his comprehensive knowledge of obscure and forgotten works, as well as of the horror masterpieces. Working from a philosophical perspective, he tries to account for how people can find pleasure in having (...)
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  • Philosophical Investigations.Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein - 1953 - New York, NY, USA: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Restoring the Conversation Socratic Dialectic in the Authorship of Søen Kierkegaard.M. W. Sinnett - 2000 - Theology in Scotland for St. Mary's College, University of St. Andrews.
     
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  • Beyond the Limits of Thought.Graham Priest - 1996 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (2):331-334.
     
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  • Socrates: Fictions of a Philosopher.Sarah Kofman - 1998 - Burns & Oates.
    Socrates is an elusive figure, Sarah Kofman asserts, and he is necessarily so since he did not write or directly state his beliefs. Kofman suggests that Socrates' avowal of ignorance was meant to be ironic. Later philosophers who interpreted his text invariably resisted the profoundly ironic character of his way of life and diverged widely in their interpretations of him. Kofman focuses especially on the views of Plato, Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche.
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  • Both/and Reading Kierkegaard : From Irony to Edification.Michael Strawser - 1997 - Perspectives in Continental Ph.
    The author presents a holistic interpretation of Soren Kierkegaard's diverse writings. The study is claimed to be philosophical in the sense that it considers Kierkegaard's ever-developing conception of Socrates as a significant clue for understanding his own thought. This view undergoes several changes and culminates in the ironic idea that Socrates himself has become a Christian. The bare suggestion that this is the case implies that irony and Christianity are in some sense compatible. ;In Part One, the author explores Kierkegaard' (...)
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  • The Disenchantment of Reason the Problem of Socrates in Modernity.Paul R. Harrison - 1994 - SUNY Press.
    This book is an examination of nineteenth-century interpretations of Socrates by Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche in the light of the contemporary debates over rationality in the modern world. These interpretations of Socrates have fundamentally influenced modern and postmodern thought, and their complexity reflects both an attraction to, and a fear of, the peculiarly modern concept of reason that Socrates is read as embodying. Socrates is seen in this book as an emblematic figure through which the constitutive tensions between enlightenment and (...)
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  • Beyond the Limits of Thought.Graham Priest - 1995 - Philosophy 71 (276):308-310.
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  • Aristotle on learning to be good.Myles F. Burnyeat - 1980 - In Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.), Essays on Aristotle's Ethics. University of California Press. pp. 69--92.
  • Kierkegaard and the Limits of Thought.Daniel Watts - 2016 - Hegel Bulletin (1):82-105.
    This essay offers an account of Kierkegaard’s view of the limits of thought and of what makes this view distinctive. With primary reference to Philosophical Fragments, and its putative representation of Christianity as unthinkable, I situate Kierkegaard’s engagement with the problem of the limits of thought, especially with respect to the views of Kant and Hegel. I argue that Kierkegaard builds in this regard on Hegel’s critique of Kant but that, against Hegel, he develops a radical distinction between two types (...)
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  • Thinking Through Kierkegaard's Anti-Climacus: Art, Imagination, and Imitation.Brian Gregor - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (3):448-465.
  • Kierkegaard and the Search for Self‐Knowledge.Daniel Watts - 2013 - European Journal of Philosophy 21 (4):525-549.
    In the first part of this essay (Sections I and II), I argue that Kierkegaard's work helps us to articulate and defend two basic requirements on searching for knowledge of one's own judgements: first, that searching for knowledge whether one judges that P requires trying to make a judgement whether P; and second that, in an important range of cases, searching for knowledge of one's own judgements requires attending to how one's acts of judging are performed. In the second part (...)
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  • What Abraham Couldn't Say.Michelle Kosch - 2008 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 82 (1):59-78.
    The explicit topic of Fear and Trembling's third Problema (the longest single section, accounting for a third of the book's total length), the theme of Abraham's silence stands not far in the background in every other section, and its importance is flagged by the pseudonym—Johannes de silentio—under which Kierkegaard had the book published. Here I aim to defend an interpretation of the meaning of the third Problema's central claim—that Abraham cannot explain himself, 'cannot speak'—and to argue on its basis for (...)
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  • Kierkegaard’s Socrates: A Venture in Evolutionary Theory.Mary‐Jane Rubenstein - 2001 - Modern Theology 17 (4):441-473.
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  • The Standard Meter by Any Name is Still a Meter Long.Heather J. Gert - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (1):50-68.
    In §50 of Philosophical Investigations Wittgenstein wrote the sentence, “There is one thing of which one can say neither that it is one metre long, nor that it is not one metre long, and that is the standard metre in Paris.” Although some interpreters have claimed that Wittgenstein’s statement is mistaken, while others have proposed various explanations showing that this must be correct, none have questioned the fact that he intended to assert that it is impossible to describe the standard (...)
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  • Dilemmatic Deliberations In Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling.Daniel Watts - 2011 - Faith and Philosophy 28 (2):174-189.
    My central claim in this paper is that Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling is governed by the basic aim to articulate a real dilemma, and to elicit its proper recognition as such. I begin by indicating how Kierkegaard’s works are shaped in general by this aim, and what the aim involves. I then show how the dilemmaticstructure of Fear and Trembling is obscured in a recent dispute between Michelle Kosch and John Lippitt regarding the basic aims and upshot of the book. (...)
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  • Kierkegaard on Truth: One or Many?Daniel Watts - 2018 - Mind 127 (505):197-223.
    This paper re-examines Kierkegaard's work with respect to the question whether truth is one or many. I argue that his famous distinction between objective and subjective truth is grounded in a unitary conception of truth as such: truth as self-coincidence. By explaining his use in this context of the term ‘redoubling’ [ Fordoblelse ], I show how Kierkegaard can intelligibly maintain that truth is neither one nor many, neither a simple unity nor a complex multiplicity. I further show how these (...)
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  • Kierkegaard on Truth: One or Many?Daniel Watts - 2016 - Mind:fzw010.
    This paper reexamines Kierkegaard's work with respect to the question whether truth is one or many. I argue that his famous distinction between objective and subjective truth is grounded in a unitary conception of truth as such: truth as self-coincidence. By explaining his use in this context of the term ‘redoubling’ [Fordoblelse], I show how Kierkegaard can intelligibly maintain that truth is neither one nor many, neither a simple unity nor a complex multiplicity. I further show how these points shed (...)
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  • Kierkegaard and Greek Philosophy.Rick Anthony Furtak - 2013 - In John Lippitt & George Pattison (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Kierkegaard. Oxford University Press. pp. 129-149.
    This chapter analyses Soren Kierkegaard's thoughts and opinions about ancient Greek philosophy. It examines the significance of Kierkegaard's references to Greek philosophy in his writings and suggests that his use of classical thought was part of his effort to define his own intellectual project. The chapter investigates how Greek philosophy influenced Kierkegaard's works and views about ethics, existential thought, Socratic faith, love, and virtue, and also considers what Kierkegaard believed was the legacy of ancient Greek philosophy.
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  • Subjective Thinking: Kierkegaard on Hegel’s Socrates.Daniel Watts - 2010 - Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 61:23-44.
    This paper aims to understand Hegel’s claim in the introduction to his Philosophy of Mind that mind is an actualization of the Idea and argues that this claim provides us with a novel and defensible way of understanding Hegel’s naturalism. I suggest that Hegel’s approach to naturalism should be understood as ‘formal’, and argue that Hegel’s Logic, particularly the section on the ‘Idea’, provides us with a method for this approach. In the first part of the paper, I present an (...)
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  • Subjective Thinking: Kierkegaard on Hegel's Socrates.Daniel Watts - 2010 - Hegel Bulletin 31 (1):23-44.
    This paper aims to understand Hegel’s claim in the introduction to his Philosophy of Mind that mind is an actualization of the Idea and argues that this claim provides us with a novel and defensible way of understanding Hegel’s naturalism. I suggest that Hegel’s approach to naturalism should be understood as ‘formal’, and argue that Hegel’s Logic, particularly the section on the ‘Idea’, provides us with a method for this approach. In the first part of the paper, I present an (...)
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  • The Standard Meter by Any Name is Still a Meter Long.Heather J. Gert - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (1):50-68.
    In §50 of Philosophical Investigations Wittgenstein wrote the sentence, “There is one thing of which one can say neither that it is one metre long, nor that it is not one metre long, and that is the standard metre in Paris.” Although some interpreters have claimed that Wittgenstein’s statement is mistaken, while others have proposed various explanations showing that this must be correct, none have questioned the fact that he intended to assert that it is impossible to describe the standard (...)
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  • Kierkegaard’s Aesthetics and the Aesthetic of Imitation.Wojciech Kaftański - 2014 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 19 (1):111-134.
    This paper challenges the general approach to Kierkegaard ’ s engagement with imitation, which privileges a strictly religious reading. Heretofore imitation has been apprehended as a coherent concept shaped within the context of imitatio Christi in the devotio moderna. I locate Kierkegaard ’ s writings in the broader context of mimesis. Analysing particular mimetic structures woven into the text, I show that a plurality of imitative models that are different fromChrist occurs therein. Addressing the distinction between the religious and the (...)
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  • Philosophical investigations.Ludwig Wittgenstein & G. E. M. Anscombe - 1953 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 161:124-124.
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  • Socratic Irony, Plato's Apology, and Kierkegaard's On the Concept of Irony.Paul Muench - 2009 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 2009 (1):71-126.
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  • The Blue and Brown Books.Newton Garver - 1961 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21 (4):576-577.
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  • Kierkegaard and Socrates: A Study in Philosophy and Faith.Christopher A. P. Nelson - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 65 (1):53-57.
  • Beyond the Limits of Thought.Patrick Grim - 1995 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 58 (3):719-723.
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  • Kierkegaard's Socratic Point of View.Paul Muench - 2007 - Kierkegaardiana 24:132-162.
  • Socratic Irony, Plato's Apology, and Kierkegaard's On the Concept of Irony.Paul Muench - 2009 - In Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, Hermann Deuser & K. Brian Söderquist (eds.), Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook. de Gruyter. pp. 71-125.
    In this paper I argue that Plato's Apology is the principal text on which Kierkegaard relies in arguing for the idea that Socrates is fundamentally an ironist. After providing an overview of the structure of this argument, I then consider Kierkegaard's more general discussion of irony, unpacking the distinction he draws between irony as a figure of speech and irony as a standpoint. I conclude by examining Kierkegaard's claim that the Apology itself is “splendidly suited for obtaining a clear concept (...)
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  • Philosophical Investigations.Ludwig Wittgenstein & G. E. M. Anscombe - 1953 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 4 (15):258-260.
     
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  • The Blue and Brown Books.Ludwig Wittgenstein - 1958 - Philosophy 34 (131):367-368.
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  • Philosophical Investigations.Ludwig Wittgenstein, G. E. M. Anscombe & R. Rhees - 1954 - Philosophy of Science 21 (4):353-354.
     
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  • On Søren Kierkegaard: Dialogue, Polemics, Lost Intimacy, and Time.Edward F. Mooney - 2008 - Ars Disputandi 8:1566-5399.
     
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  • The Varieties of Aesthetic Disinterestedness.Norman Kreitman - 2006 - Contemporary Aesthetics 4.
  • Moral Exemplars and Commitment in Kierkegaard's "Fear and Trembling".Andrew Alan Cross - 1994 - Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    I defend an interpretation of Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling according to which that text's discussion of the "teleological suspension of the ethical" is merely one part of a larger project, and cannot be properly understood outside the context of that project. I argue that the question of the rightness of Abraham's action is embedded in a larger question, that of what way of life is exemplified by Abraham; and that this larger question is embedded in yet another, that of whether (...)
     
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