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  1. Informed Consent and Research Involving the Newly Dead.Mark R. Wicclair - 2002 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (4):351-372.
    : This paper examines informed consent in relation to research involving the newly dead. Reasons are presented for facilitating advance decision making in relation to postmortem research, and it is argued that the informed consent of family members should be sought when the deceased have not made a premortem decision. Regardless of whether the dead can be harmed, there are two important respects in which family consent can serve to protect the dead: (1) protecting the deceased's body from being used (...)
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  • Ethics and Research with Deceased Patients.Mark R. Wicclair - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (1):87-97.
    In a provocative 1974 article entitled “Harvesting the Dead,” Willard Gaylin explored potential uses of “neomorts,” or what are currently referred to as “heart-beating cadavers”—that is, humans determined to be dead by neurological criteria and whose cardiopulmonary function is medically maintained by ventilators, vasopressors, and so forth. Medical research was one of the potential uses Gaylin identified. He pointed out that tests of drugs and medical procedures that would have unacceptable health risks if performed on living human subjects could be (...)
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  • Specified Principlism: What is It, and Does It Really Resolve Cases Better Than Casuistry?Carson Strong - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (3):323 – 341.
    Principlism has been advocated as an approach to resolving concrete cases and issues in bioethics, but critics have pointed out that a main problem for principlism is its lack of a method for assigning priorities to conflicting ethical principles. A version of principlism referred to as 'specified principlism' has been put forward in an attempt to overcome this problem. However, none of the advocates of specified principlism have attempted to demonstrate that the method actually works in resolving detailed clinical cases. (...)
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  • How Anonymous is 'Anonymous'? Some Suggestions Towards a Coherent Universal Coding System for Genetic Samples.Harald Schmidt & Shawneequa Callier - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (5):304-309.
    So-called ‘anonymous’ tissue samples are widely used in research. Because they lack externally identifying information, they are viewed as useful in reconciling conflicts between the control, privacy and confidentiality interests of those from whom the samples originated and the public (or commercial) interest in carrying out research, as reflected in ‘consent or anonymise’ policies. High level guidance documents suggest that withdrawal of consent and samples and the provision of feedback are impossible in the case of anonymous samples. In view of (...)
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  • Death.Thomas Nagel - 1970 - Noûs 4 (1):73-80.
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  • Informed Consent and Biobanks.Ellen Wright Clayton - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (1):15-21.
    Biomedical research has always relied on access to human biological materials and clinical information, resources that when combined form biobanks. In the past, it appears that investigators sometimes used these resources with relatively little oversight, and without the consent of the individuals from whom these materials and information were obtained. Several developments in the last ten to fifteen years have converged to place greater emphasis on the role of individual consent in the creation and use of biobanks. The most important (...)
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  • Informed Consent and Biobanks.Ellen Wright Clayton - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (1):15-21.
    Biomedical research has always relied on access to human biological materials and clinical information, resources that when combined form biobanks. In the past, it appears that investigators sometimes used these resources with relatively little oversight, and without the consent of the individuals from whom these materials and information were obtained. Several developments in the last ten to fifteen years have converged to place greater emphasis on the role of individual consent in the creation and use of biobanks. The most important (...)
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  • Nicomachean Ethics.Martin Aristotle & Ostwald - 1962 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    C. C. W. Taylor presents a clear and faithful new translation of one of the most famous and influential texts in the history of Western thought, accompanied by an analytical and critical commentary focusing on philosophical issues. In Books II to IV of the Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle gives his account of virtue of character, which is central to his ethical theory as a whole and a key topic in much modern ethical writing.
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