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  1. Aristotle and the Virtues.Howard J. Curzer - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Howard J. Curzer presents a fresh new reading of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, which brings each of the virtues alive. He argues that justice and friendship are symbiotic in Aristotle's view; reveals how virtue ethics is not only about being good, but about becoming good; and describes Aristotle's ultimate quest to determine happiness.
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  • Akrasia Revisited: An Interpretation and Defense of Aristotle.Christopher Toner - 2003 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):283-306.
  • Akrasia Revisited: An Interpretation and Defense of Aristotle.Christopher Toner - 2003 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):283-306.
  • The Suberogatory.Julia Driver - 1992 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 70 (3):286 – 295.
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  • Self-Control in Action.Alfred Mele - 2011 - In S. Gallagher (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Self. Oxford University Press.
    This article describes a neo-Aristotelian conception of self-control, a concept that seems essential to what it means to be a mature human person. It discusses the moral condition known as akrasia and the conception of self that underpins it. While Aristotle regarded the human self to be primarily rational where reason is taken in a strong sense, this article suggests a more holistic conception of the self, where to act out of passion may not mean that one is acting without (...)
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  • Aristotle on Akrasia and Knowledge.Alfred R. Mele - 1981 - Modern Schoolman 58 (3):137-157.
    In this paper I shall argue that there is good reason to doubt a traditional supposition about this pair of distinctions between types of knowledge used to address worries about Aristotle's account of akrasia, and I shall develop an interpretation on which the supposition is not made. It will be seen that the interpretation to be advanced - on which the entire chapter expresses Aristotle's own position on akrasia - resolves the apparent internal and external inconsistencies; and I hope to (...)
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  • Aristotle, the Socratic Principle, and the Problem of Akrasia.Robert C. Solomon - 1971 - Modern Schoolman 49 (1):13-21.
  • Virtue and Duty: Negotiating Between Different Ethical Traditions.Julia Annas - 2015 - Journal of Value Inquiry 49 (4):605-618.
  • Virtue Theory, Ideal Observers, and the Supererogatory.Jason Kawall - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 146 (2):179-96.
    I argue that recent virtue theories (including those of Hursthouse, Slote, and Swanton) face important initial difficulties in accommodating the supererogatory. In particular, I consider several potential characterizations of the supererogatory modeled upon these familiar virtue theories (and their accounts of rightness) and argue that they fail to provide an adequate account of supererogation. In the second half of the paper I sketch an alternative virtue-based characterization of supererogation, one that is grounded in the attitudes of virtuous ideal observers, and (...)
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  • A Dilemma for Neo-Aristotelian Supererogation.Alan T. Wilson - 2017 - Ethics 128 (1):199-211.
    It has recently been argued that virtue ethics cannot accommodate the possibility of supererogation. In response, Rebecca Stangl proposes a neo-Aristotelian account of supererogation that, she argues, generates plausible verdicts, while also being compatible with the doctrine of the mean. I argue that Stangl’s response is unsuccessful. First, I demonstrate that the proposal in its current form is problematically indeterminate, meaning that we cannot know what verdicts would be produced in response to classic examples. Second, I argue that anyone attempting (...)
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  • Aristotle, Akrasia, and the Place of Desire in Moral Reasoning.Byron J. Stoyles - 2007 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (2):195-207.
    This paper serves both as a discussion of Henry’s (Ethical Theory Moral Practice, 5:255–270, 2002) interpretation of Aristotle on the possibility of akrasia – knowing something is wrong and doing it anyway – and an indication of the importance of desire in Aristotle’s account of moral reasoning. As I will explain, Henry’s interpretation is advantageous for the reason that it makes clear how Aristotle could have made good sense of genuine akrasia, a phenomenon that we seem to observe in the (...)
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  • Aristotle on Akrasia, Eudaimonia, and the Psychology of Action.Alfred R. Mele - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (4):375 - 393.
    ALTHOUGH Aristotle's work on akrasia has prompted numerous competing interpretations, at least one point seems clear: incontinent action is, for him, dependent upon some deficiency in the agent's cognitive condition at the time of action. But why, exactly, did he take this view? This question, my central concern in the present paper, is not just a query about Aristotle's understanding of incontinent action. It leads us at once into a tangled web of questions about his conception of human action and (...)
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  • Adopting Roles: Generosity and Presumptuousness.Rowland Stout - 2015 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 77:141-161.
    Generosity is not the same thing as kindness or self-sacrifice. Presumptuousness is incompatible with generosity, but not with kindness or self-sacrifice. I consider a kind but interfering neighbour who inappropriately takes over the role of mother to my daughter; her behaviour is not generous. Presumptuousness is the improper exercise of a disposition to adopt a role that one does not have. With this in mind I explore the idea that generosity is the proper exercise of the disposition to adopt a (...)
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  • Aristotle on Practical Inference, the Explanation of Action, and Akrasia.Gerasimos Santas - 1969 - Phronesis 14 (2):162-189.
  • Virtue and Heroism.Julia Annas - unknown
    This is the text of the Lindley Lecture for 2015 given by Julia Annas, an American philosopher.
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  • Plato and Aristotle on Belief, Habit, and "Akrasia".Amelie Rorty - 1970 - American Philosophical Quarterly 7 (1):50 - 61.
  • Saints and Heroes.J. O. Urmson - 1958 - In A. I. Melden (ed.), Essays in Moral Philosophy. University of Washington Press.
     
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  • Neo-Aristotelian Supererogation.Rebecca Stangl - 2016 - Ethics 126 (2):339-365.
    I develop and defend the following neo-Aristotelian account of supererogation: an action is supererogatory if and only if it is overall virtuous and either the omission of an overall virtuous action in that situation would not be overall vicious or there is some overall virtuous action that is less virtuous than it and whose performance in its place would not be overall vicious. I develop this account from within the virtue-ethical tradition. And I argue that it is intuitively defensible and (...)
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  • Nicomachean Ethics VII. 9 (1151b23)-10 : (In)Continence in Context.Teun Tieleman - 2009 - In Carlo Natali (ed.), Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford University Press.
  • Virtue and Duty: Negotiating Between Different Ethical Traditions.Christel Fricke - 2015 - Journal of Value Inquiry 49 (4):605-618.
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