Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Weighing Goods: Equality, Uncertainty and Time.John Broome - 1991 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This study uses techniques from economics to illuminate fundamental questions in ethics, particularly in the foundations of utilitarianism. Topics considered include the nature of teleological ethics, the foundations of decision theory, the value of equality and the moral significance of a person's continuing identity through time.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   373 citations  
  • Probability in Ethics.David McCarthy - 2016 - In Alan Hájek & Christopher Hitchcock (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Probability. Oxford University Press. pp. 705–737.
    The article is a plea for ethicists to regard probability as one of their most important concerns. It outlines a series of topics of central importance in ethical theory in which probability is implicated, often in a surprisingly deep way, and lists a number of open problems. Topics covered include: interpretations of probability in ethical contexts; the evaluative and normative significance of risk or uncertainty; uses and abuses of expected utility theory; veils of ignorance; Harsanyi’s aggregation theorem; population size problems; (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Decision Theory and Morality.James Dreier - 2004 - In Piers Rawling & Al Mele (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Rationality. Oxford University Press. pp. 156--181.
    Dreier shows how the formal apparatus of decision theory is connected to some abstract issues in moral theory. He begins by explaining how to think about utility and the advice that decision theory gives us, in particular, decision theory does not assume or insist that all rational agents act in their own self-interest. Next he examines decision theory’s contributions to social contract theory, with emphasis on David Gauthier’s rationalist contractualism. Dreier’s third section considers a reinterpretation of the formal theory that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Ethical Criteria of Risk Acceptance.Sven Ove Hansson - 2003 - Erkenntnis 59 (3):291 - 309.
    Mainstream moral theories deal with situations in which the outcome of each possible action is well-determined and knowable. In order to make ethics relevant for problems of risk and uncertainty, moral theories have to be extended so that they cover actions whose outcomes are not determinable beforehand. One approach to this extension problem is to develop methods for appraising probabilistic combinations of outcomes. This approach is investigated and shown not to solve the problem. An alternative approach is then developed. Its (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   63 citations  
  • Indeterminate Oughts.J. Robert G. Williams - 2017 - Ethics 127 (3):645-673.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Risk and Radical Uncertainty in HIV Research.Caspar Hare - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (2):87-89.
  • The Morality of Risks in Research: Reflections on Kumar.F. M. Kamm - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (2):128-131.
  • Must Research Benefit Human Subjects If It is to Be Permissible?Daniel Wikler - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (2):114-117.
  • Why High-Risk, Non-Expected-Utility-Maximising Gambles Can Be Rational and Beneficial: The Case of HIV Cure Studies.Lara Buchak - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics (2):1-6.
    Some early phase clinical studies of candidate HIV cure and remission interventions appear to have adverse medical risk–benefit ratios for participants. Why, then, do people participate? And is it ethically permissible to allow them to participate? Recent work in decision theory sheds light on both of these questions, by casting doubt on the idea that rational individuals prefer choices that maximise expected utility, and therefore by casting doubt on the idea that researchers have an ethical obligation not to enrol participants (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • How to Keep High-Risk Studies Ethical: Classifying Candidate Solutions.Nir Eyal - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (2):74-77.
  • Action, Deontology, and Risk: Against the Multiplicative Model.Sergio Tenenbaum - 2017 - Ethics 127 (3):674-707.
    Deontological theories face difficulties in accounting for situations involving risk; the most natural ways of extending deontological principles to such situations have unpalatable consequences. In extending ethical principles to decision under risk, theorists often assume the risk must be incorporated into the theory by means of a function from the product of probability assignments to certain values. Deontologists should reject this assumption; essentially different actions are available to the agent when she cannot know that a certain act is in her (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Deontological Decision Theory and Agent-Centered Options.Seth Lazar - 2017 - Ethics 127 (3):579-609.
    Deontologists have long been upbraided for lacking an account of justified decision- making under risk and uncertainty. One response is to develop a deontological decision theory—a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for an act’s being permissible given an agent’s imperfect information. In this article, I show that deontologists can make more use of regular decision theory than some might have thought, but that we must adapt decision theory to accommodate agent- centered options—permissions to favor or sacrifice our own interests, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Priority or Equality for Possible People?Alex Voorhoeve & Marc Fleurbaey - 2016 - Ethics 126 (4):929-954.
    Suppose that you must make choices that may influence the well-being and the identities of the people who will exist, though not the number of people who will exist. How ought you to choose? This paper answers this question. It argues that the currency of distributive ethics in such cases is a combination of an individual’s final well-being and her expected well-being conditional on her existence. It also argues that this currency should be distributed in an egalitarian, rather than a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations