Switch to: Citations

References in:

Kant's Theory of Punishment

Utilitas 15 (2):206 (2003)

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Kantian Ethics Almost Without Apology.Robert N. Johnson - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (4):594.
    Alas, you were at a Kant conference—or many philosophers’ idea of one—and if you are shocked, perhaps you are not a Kantian. For this scenario illustrates two fundamental criticisms of Kant’s vision of morality as “duty”: It is outrageous to hold that even for the hero “all the good he can ever perform still is merely duty”. And those who, like these parents, are moved to every morally significant action by a sense of duty are, far from exemplary, morally repugnant. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Cummiskey's Kantian Consequentialism.Richard Dean - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (1):25.
    In Kantian Consequentialism, David Cummiskey argues that the central ideas of Kant's moral philosophy provide claims about value which, if applied consistently, lead to consequentialist normative principles. While Kant himself was not a consequentialist, Cummiskey thinks he should have been, given his fundamental positions in ethics. I argue that Cummiskey is mistaken. Cummiskey's argument relies on a non-Kantian idea about value, namely that value can be defined, and objects with value identified, conceptually prior to and independent of the choices that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Kantian Consequentialism.David Cummiskey - 1990 - Ethics 100 (3):586-615.
    The central problem for normative ethics is the conflict between a consequentialist view--that morality requires promoting the good of all--and a belief that the rights of the individual place significant constraints on what may be done to help others. Standard interpretations see Kant as rejecting all forms of consequentialism, and defending a theory which is fundamentally duty-based and agent-centered. Certain actions, like sacrificing the innocent, are categorically forbidden. In this original and controversial work, Cummiskey argues that there is no defensible (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  • Kant's Political Thought: Its Origins and Development.Jeffrie G. Murphy, Hans Saner & E. B. Ashton - 1975 - Philosophical Review 84 (3):433.
  • Lectures on Kant’s Political Philosophy,.Hannah Arendt & Ronald Beiner - 1982 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 56 (2):386-386.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   169 citations  
  • Kant's Political Philosophy.James Scheuermann - 1985 - Ethics 95 (2):366-368.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  • On Kant’s Rechtslehre.Katrin Flikschuh - 1997 - European Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):50-73.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Political Liberalism by John Rawls. [REVIEW]Philip Pettit - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy 91 (4):215-220.
  • A Theory of Justice.John Rawls - unknown
    Though the revised edition of A Theory of Justice, published in 1999, is the definitive statement of Rawls's view, so much of the extensive literature on Rawls's theory refers to the first edition.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3729 citations  
  • Critique of Pure Reason.I. Kant - 1787/1998 - Philosophy 59 (230):555-557.
  • Has Kant a Philosophy of Law?Stuart M. Brown - 1962 - Philosophical Review 71 (1):33-48.
  • Kant’s Derivation of the Formula of the Categorical Imperative: How to Get It Right.Jacqueline Mariña - 1998 - Kant Studien 89 (2):167-178.
    This paper explores the charge by Bruce Aune and Allen Wood that a gap exists in Kant's derivation of the Categorical Imperative. I show that properly understood, no such gap exists, and that the deduction of the Categorical Imperative is successful as it stands.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Kant's Transcendental Deduction of Political Authority.Kevin Thompson - 2001 - Kant Studien 92 (1):62-78.
    The concept of political authority is the guiding problematic of Kant's mature political philosophy. The proper foundation of state authority lies, according to him, in the idea of an “original contract” and it is only in terms of this regulative principle that the sovereign nature of the state can even be conceived. By placing this doctrine at the core of his political thought Kant appears to affirm the fundamental tenet of the contractarian tradition: legitimate political authority arises only from the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Is Kant a Retributivist?M. Tunick - 1996 - History of Political Thought 17 (1):60-78.
    Retributivists are often thought to give 'deontological' theories of punishment, arguing that we should punish not for the beneficial consequences of doing so such as deterrence or incapacitation, but purely because justice demands it. Kant is often regarded as the paradigmatic retributivist. In some passages Kant does appear to give a deontological theory of punishment. For example, Kant insists that on an island where all the people were to leave the next day, forever dissolving and dispersing the community, the last (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Laws of Freedom: A Study of Kant's Method of Applying the Categorical Imperative in the Metaphysik der Sitten.J. Kemp - 1965 - Philosophical Quarterly 15 (59):182.
  • A Critical Reevaluation of the Alleged "Empty Formalism" of Kantian Ethics.Ping-Cheung Lo - 1981 - Ethics 91 (2):181-201.
  • Critique of Pure Reason.Wolfgang Schwarz - 1966 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 26 (3):449-451.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   678 citations  
  • Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy.Bernard Williams - 1987 - Behaviorism 15 (2):179-181.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   404 citations  
  • Kant's Theory of Punishment: Deterrence in its Threat, Retribution in its Execution. [REVIEW]B. Sharon Byrd - 1989 - Law and Philosophy 8 (2):151 - 200.
    Kant's theory of punishment is commonly regarded as purely retributive in nature, and indeed much of his discourse seems to support that interpretation. Still, it leaves one with certain misgivings regarding the internal consistency of his position. Perhaps the problem lies not in Kant's inconsistency nor in the senility sometimes claimed to be apparent in the Metaphysic of Morals, but rather in a superimposed, modern yet monistic view of punishment. Historical considerations tend to show that Kant was discussing not one, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Utilitarianism and the Punishment of the Innocent: The Origins of a False Doctrine1: F. Rosen.F. Rosen - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (1):23-37.
    This paper examines the commonplace assertion that utilitarianism allows for and even, at times, requires the punishment of the innocent. It traces the origins of this doctrine to the writings of the British Idealists and the subsequent development of what is called the post-utilitarian paradigm which posits various justifications for punishment such as retribution, deterrence and reform, finds all of them inadequate, and then, with the addition of other ideas, reconciles them. The idea of deterrence is falsely depicted as the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Was T. H. Green a Utilitarian?*: Avital Simhony.Avital Simhony - 1995 - Utilitas 7 (1):121-144.
    Was Green a utilitarian? At least two studies suggest that he was, at least in some sense. One claim is inspired by Macpherson's association of nineteenth-century liberalism with utilitarianism. Drawing on this argument, Greengarten and Hansen claim that Green's departure from utilitarianism is only partial. His commitment to capitalism indicates a subscription to utilitarianism since the latter is the justificatory force of capitalist institutions.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Could Kant Have Been A Utilitarian?*: R. M. Hare.R. M. Hare - 1993 - Utilitas 5 (1):1-16.
    … the supreme end, the happiness of all mankind. The law concerning punishment is a Categorical Imperative; and woe to him who rummages around in the winding paths of a theory of happiness, looking for some advantage to be gained by releasing the criminal from punishment or by reducing the amount of it.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • The Demography of the Kingdom of Ends: Daniel N. Robinson and Rom Harre.Daniel N. Robinson - 1994 - Philosophy 69 (267):5-19.
    In the Groundwork of the Metaphysic of Morals' Kant is explicit, sometimes to the point of peevishness, in denying anthropology and psychology any part or place in his moral science. Recognizing that this will strike many as counterintuitive he is unrepentant: ‘We require no skill to make ourselves intelligible to the multitude once we renounce all profundity of thought’. That the doctrine to be defended is not exemplified in daily experience or even in imaginable encounters is necessitated by the very (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Toward Social Reform: Kant's Penal Theory Reinterpreted.Sarah Williams Holtman - 1997 - Utilitas 9 (1):3-21.
    Here I set the stage for developing a Kantian account of punishment attuned to social and economic injustice and to the need for prison reform. I argue that we cannot appreciate Kant's own discussion of punishment unless we read it in light of the theory of justice of which it is a part and the fundamental commitments of that theory to freedom, autonomy and equality. As important, we cannot properly evaluate Kant's advocacy of the law of retribution unless we recognize (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Egoism and Formalism in the Development of Kant’s Moral Philosophy.Jeffrey Edwards & Stony Brook - 2000 - Kant Studien 91 (4):411-432.
  • A Framework for the Derivation and Reconstruction of the Categorical Imperative.Christian J. Onof - 1998 - Kant Studien 89 (4):410-427.
  • Kant's Psychological Hedonism.A. Phillips Griffiths - 1991 - Philosophy 66 (256):207 - 216.
    As far as consideration of man as phenomenon, as appearance, as an empirical self, is concerned, Kant appears to be a thoroughgoing psychological hedonist.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Ethical Theory. By Charles A. Baylis. [REVIEW]Richard B. Brandt - 1959 - Ethics 70:328.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  • Making Sense of Retributivism.J. Angelo Corlett - 2001 - Philosophy 76 (1):77-110.
    This paper explicates and challenges John Rawl's argument concerning a rule-utilitarian theory of punishment. In so doing, it argues in favour of a retributivist theory of punishment, one that seeks to justify, not only particular forms of punishment, but the institution of punishment itself. Some crucial objections to retributivism are then considered: one regarding the adverse effects of punishment on the innocent, another concerning proportional punishment, a third pertaining to vengeance and retribution, a Marxian concern with retributive punishment, and a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • The Standard View of the Categorical Imperative.Peter J. Steinberger - 1999 - Kant Studien 90 (1):91-99.
  • Kant's Practical Philosophy.Allen W. Wood - 2000 - In Karl Ameriks (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to German Idealism. Cambridge University Press. pp. 57--75.
  • 10 Autonomy, Obligation, and Virtue: An Overview of Kant's Moral Philosophy.J. B. Schneewind - 1992 - In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Kant. Cambridge University Press. pp. 3--309.