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  1. Mutual Benevolence and the Theory of Happiness.David M. Estlund - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (4):187-204.
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  • Ethics and the History of Philosophy. Selected Essays.George Boas - 1952 - Journal of Philosophy 49 (24):762-765.
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  • Utilitarianism, Sociobiology, and the Limits of Benevolence.Danny Scoccia - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (7):329.
  • The Reward Event and Motivation.Carolyn R. Morillo - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (4):169-186.
    In philosophy, the textbook case for the discussion of human motivation is the examination (and almost always, the refutation) of psychological egoism. The arguments have become part of the folklore of our tribe, from their inclusion in countless introductory texts. [...] One of my central aims has been to define the issues empirically, so we do not just settle them by definition. Although I am inclined at present to put my bets on the reward-event theory, with its internalism, monism, and (...)
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  • Ethics.William Frankena - 1967 - Philosophy of Science 34 (1):74-74.
     
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  • John Clarke and Francis Hutcheson on Self-Love and Moral Motivation.Robert Michael Stewart - 1982 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (3):261-277.
  • Bishop Butler's Refutation of Psychological Hedonism.Reginald Jackson - 1943 - Philosophy 18 (70):114 - 139.
    To the question ‘Why do you try to realize this?’ your answer may be ‘Because I desire that and I think that the realization of this would involve the realization of that.’ Or your answer may be ‘Because I desire this.’ If ‘Why?’ is interpreted as ‘Desiring what?’ the question ‘Why do you desire this?’ is improper. The word ‘desire’ is, however, frequently used in such a way as to countenance the impropriety. It is so used not only when what (...)
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  • Butler on Disinterested Actions.M. J. Scott-Taggart - 1968 - Philosophical Quarterly 18 (70):16-28.