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  1. Gestures of Ethical Life: Reading Holderlin's Question of Measure After Heidegger.David Michael Kleinberg-Levin - 2005 - Stanford University Press.
    For Greek antiquity, the question of right or fitting measure constituted the very heart of both ethics and politics. But can the Good of the ethical life and the Justice of the political be reduced to measurement and calculation? If they are matters of measure, are they not also absolutely immeasurable? In critical dialogue with texts by Plato, Hölderlin, Rilke, Heidegger, Benjamin, Adorno, Marx, Merleau-Ponty, Levinas, and Levi, the author argues that the question of measure has become ever more urgent (...)
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  • Philosophical Investigations.Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein - 1953 - New York, NY, USA: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Zoographies: The Question of the Animal From Heidegger to Derrida.Matthew Calarco - 2008 - Columbia University Press.
    Matthew Calarco draws on ethological and evolutionary evidence and the work of Heidegger, who called for a radicalized responsibility toward all forms of life.
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  • The Roots of Morality.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 2008 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    This book argues the case for a foundationalist ethics centrally based on an empirical understanding of human nature. For Maxine Sheets-Johnstone, “an ethics formulated on the foundations of anything other than human nature, hence on anything other than an identification of pan-cultural human realities, lacks solid empirical moorings. It easily loses itself in isolated hypotheticals, reductionist scenarios, or theoretical abstractions—in the prisoner’s dilemma, selfish genes, dedicated brain modules, evolutionary altruism, or psychological egoism, for example—or it easily becomes itself an ethical (...)
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  • The Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics: World, Finitude, Solitude.Martin Heidegger - 1995 - Indiana University Press.
    This work, the text of Martin Heidegger's lecture course of 1929/30, is crucial for an understanding of Heidegger's transition from the major work of his early years, Being and Time, to his later preoccupations with language, truth, and ...
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  • Forms of Vitality: Exploring Dynamic Experience in Psychology, the Arts, Psychotherapy, and Development.Daniel N. Stern - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    In his new book, eminent psychologist - Daniel Stern, explores the hitherto neglected topic of 'vitality'. Truly a tour de force from a brilliant clinician and scientist, Forms of Vitality is a profound and absorbing book - one that will be essential reading for psychologists, psychotherapists, and those in the creative arts.
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  • The Primacy of Movement.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 2004 - Springer.
    chapter 1 Neandertals Experience shows the problem of the mind cannot be solved by attacking the citadel itself. — the mind is function of body. ...
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  • The Perception of the Environment: Essays on Livelihood, Dwelling & Skill.Tim Ingold - 2000 - Routledge.
    In this work Tim Ingold provides a persuasive new approach to the theory behind our perception of the world around us. The core of the argument is that where we refer to cultural variation we should be instead be talking about variation in skill. Neither genetically innate or culturally acquired, skills are incorporated into the human organism through practice and training in an environment.They are as much biological as cultural.
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  • Material Phenomenology.Michel Henry - 2008 - Fordham University Press.
    Translator's preface -- Introduction: The question of phenomenology -- Hyletic phenomenology and material phenomenology -- The phenomenological method -- Pathos-with reflections on Husserl's Fifth cartesian meditation -- For a phenomenology of community.
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  • I Am the Truth: Toward a Philosophy of Christianity.Michel Henry - 2003 - Stanford University Press.
    A part of the “return to religion” now evident in European philosophy, this book represents the culmination of the career of a leading phenomenological thinker whose earlier works trace a trajectory from Marx through a genealogy of psychoanalysis that interprets Descartes’s “I think, I am” as “I feel myself thinking, I am.” In this book, Henry does not ask whether Christianity is “true” or “false.” Rather, what is in question here is what Christianity considers as truth, what kind of truth (...)
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  • The Animal That Therefore I Am.Jacques Derrida - 2002 - Fordham University Press.
    The animal that therefore I am (more to follow) -- But as for me, who am I (following)? -- And say the animal responded -- I don't know why we are doing this.
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  • The Open: Man and Animal.Giorgio Agamben - 2003 - Stanford University Press.
    The end of human history is an event that has been foreseen or announced by both messianics and dialecticians. But who is the protagonist of that history that is coming—or has come—to a close? What is man? How did he come on the scene? And how has he maintained his privileged place as the master of, or first among, the animals? In The Open, contemporary Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben considers the ways in which the “human” has been thought of as (...)
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  • Animation: Analyses, Elaborations, and Implications.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 2014 - Husserl Studies 30 (3):247-268.
    This article highlights a neglected, if not wholly overlooked, topic in phenomenology, a topic central to Husserl’s writings on animate organism, namely, animation. Though Husserl did not explore animation to the fullest in his descriptions of animate organism, his texts are integral to the task of fathoming animation. The article’s introduction focuses on seminal aspects of animate organisms found within several such texts and elaborates their significance for a phenomenological understanding of animation. The article furthermore highlights Husserl’s pointed recognition of (...)
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  • Riding in the Skin of the Movement: An Agogic Practice.Stephen J. Smith - 2015 - Phenomenology and Practice 9 (1):41-54.
    The art of riding imagines the human-horse relation in the image of the centaur. In synchronous motions, riding is a dance of sorts, contact of bodies in the skin of the moment. Yet always there is the possibility of fussing, flailing, falling and failing in moments of resistance, evasion and contrariness. Through phenomenological reflection on such moments, riding can be understood not simply in terms of its difficulties of centaurian mastery, but in terms of the postural, positional, gestural, expressive nuances (...)
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  • Essential Clarifications of ‘Self-Affection’ and Husserl’s ‘Sphere of Ownness’: First Steps Toward a Pure Phenomenology of (Human) Nature.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 2006 - Continental Philosophy Review 39 (4):361-391.
    This article begins with a critical discussion of the commonly used phenomenological term “self-affection,” showing how the term is problematic. It proceeds to clarify obscurities and other impediments in current usage of the term through initial analyses of experience and to single out a transcendental clue found in Husserl’s descriptive remarks on wakeful world-consciousness, a clue leading to a basic phenomenological truth of wakeful human life. The truth centers on temporality and movement, and on animation. The three detailed investigations that (...)
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  • The First Rush of Movement: A Phenomenological Preface to Movement Education.Stephen J. Smith - 2007 - Phenomenology and Practice 1 (1):47-75.
    Children’s lived experiences of movement indicate possibilities for teaching them to be at home in increasingly challenging domains of activity. Especially significant are movements that reflect landscape connection, that carry an intention not confined to individual purpose, and that are enhanced by observational glance. The first rush of movement is described phenomenologically as an essential feature of these movements and of the vital consciousness they engender. The phenomenon of the first rush of movement attests to a mimetic impulse towards otherness (...)
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  • Caring Caresses and the Embodiment of Good Teaching.Stephen Smith - 2012 - Phenomenology and Practice 6 (2):65-83.
    Attention is drawn to the movements of the body and to the ethical imperative that emerges in compelling, flowing moments of teaching. Such moments of teaching are not primarily intellectual, discursive events, but physical, sensual experiences in which the body surrenders to its own movements. Teaching is recognized momentarily as a carnal intensity embedded in and emerging from the flesh. The ethical imperative to this teaching is felt proprioceptively and kinaesthetically when one holds in self-motion the well-being of another as (...)
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  • The Animal That Therefore I Am.Jacques Derrida & David Wills - 2002 - Critical Inquiry 28 (2):369-418.
  • Heidegger's Animals.Stuart Elden - 2006 - Continental Philosophy Review 39 (3):273-291.
    This paper provides a reading of Heidegger's work on the question of animality. Like the majority of discussions of this topic it utilises the 1929–30 course The Fundamental Concepts of Metaphysics, but the analysis seeks to go beyond this course alone in order to look at the figure or figures of animals in Heidegger's work more generally. This broader analysis shows that animals are always figured as lacking: as poor in world, without history, without hands, without dwelling, without space. The (...)
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  • Becoming Horse in the Duration of the Moment: The Trainer's Challenge.Stephen Smith - 2011 - Phenomenology and Practice 5 (1):7-26.
    Language skirts the somatic fringes of the moment, particularly in practices where the powers of human speech and writing seem nullified. Horse training is one such practice. We tell stories of horse training that sensitize us and bring us close to creatures whose movements, resonating with our own, connect us to a prelinguistic, animate world. In so doing, we bridge the gap between the reflective detachment of our customary, wordy practices and the wordlessness of pre-reflective animality. Yet a phenomenological discursiveness (...)
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  • Heidegger’s Later Thinking of Animality.Andrew J. Mitchell - 2011 - Gatherings: The Heidegger Circle Annual 1:74-85.
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  • From Life to Existence: A Reconsideration of the Question of Intentionality in Michel Henry’s Ethics.Frédéric Seyler - 2012 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 20 (2):98-115.
    Michel Henry has renewed our understanding of life as immanent affectivity: life cannot be reduced to what can be made visible; it is – as immanent and as affectivity – radically invisible. However, if life (la vie) is radically immanent, the living (le vivant ) has nonetheless to relate to the world: it has to exist . But, since existence requires and includes intentional components, human reality – being both living and existing – implies that immanence and intentionality be related (...)
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  • Like Water in Water.Tom Tyler - 2005 - Journal for Cultural Research 9 (3):265-279.
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  • How Not to Be a Jellyfish.Ted Toadvine - 2007 - In Christian Lotz & Corinne Painter (eds.), Phenomenology and the Non-Human Animal. Springer. pp. 39--55.
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