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  1. The Interaction of Emotion and Cognition: The Relation Between the Human Amygdala and Cognitive Awareness.Elizabeth A. Phelps - 2005 - In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. pp. 61-76.
  • Rethinking Expertise.H. M. Collins & Robert Evans - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    ISBN-13: 978-0-226-11360-9 (cloth : alk. paper) ISBN-10: 0-226-11360-4 ... HM651.C64 2007 158.1—dc22 2007022671 The paper used in this publication meets the minimum requirements of the American National Standard for Information ...
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  • The Evolution of Imagination: An Archaeological Perspective.Steven J. Mithen - 2001 - Substance 30 (1/2):28.
  • Emotion Words, Regardless of Polarity, Have a Processing Advantage Over Neutral Words.Stavroula-Thaleia Kousta, David P. Vinson & Gabriella Vigliocco - 2009 - Cognition 112 (3):473-481.
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  • Demystifying Social Cognition: A Hebbian Perspective.Christian Keysers & David I. Perrett - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (11):501-507.
  • Grounded Cognition: Past, Present, and Future.Lawrence W. Barsalou - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):716-724.
    Thirty years ago, grounded cognition had roots in philosophy, perception, cognitive linguistics, psycholinguistics, cognitive psychology, and cognitive neuropsychology. During the next 20 years, grounded cognition continued developing in these areas, and it also took new forms in robotics, cognitive ecology, cognitive neuroscience, and developmental psychology. In the past 10 years, research on grounded cognition has grown rapidly, especially in cognitive neuroscience, social neuroscience, cognitive psychology, social psychology, and developmental psychology. Currently, grounded cognition appears to be achieving increased acceptance throughout cognitive (...)
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  • Language as a Tool for Interacting Minds.Kristian Tylén, Ethan Weed, Mikkel Wallentin, Andreas Roepstorff & Chris D. Frith - 2010 - Mind and Language 25 (1):3-29.
    What is the role of language in social interaction? What does language bring to social encounters? We argue that language can be conceived of as a tool for interacting minds, enabling especially effective and flexible forms of social coordination, perspective-taking and joint action. In a review of evidence from a broad range of disciplines, we pursue elaborations of the language-as-a-tool metaphor, exploring four ways in which language is employed in facilitation of social interaction. We argue that language dramatically extends the (...)
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  • Enactive Intersubjectivity: Participatory Sense-Making and Mutual Incorporation.Thomas Fuchs & Hanne De Jaegher - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):465-486.
    Current theories of social cognition are mainly based on a representationalist view. Moreover, they focus on a rather sophisticated and limited aspect of understanding others, i.e. on how we predict and explain others’ behaviours through representing their mental states. Research into the ‘social brain’ has also favoured a third-person paradigm of social cognition as a passive observation of others’ behaviour, attributing it to an inferential, simulative or projective process in the individual brain. In this paper, we present a concept of (...)
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  • Why Animals Are Not Robots.Theresa S. S. Schilhab - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (3):599-611.
    In disciplines traditionally studying expertise such as sociology, philosophy, and pedagogy, discussions of demarcation criteria typically centre on how and why human expertise differs from the expertise of artificial expert systems. Therefore, the demarcation criteria has been drawn between robots as formalized logical architectures and humans as creative, social subjects, creating a bipartite division that leaves out animals. However, by downsizing the discussion of animal cognition and implicitly intuiting assimilation of living organisms to robots, key features to explain why human (...)
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  • Six Views of Embodied Cognition.Margaret Wilson - 2002 - Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 9 (4):625--636.
  • Language and Embodiment.Claudia Scorolli & Anna Borghi - 2008 - Anthropology and Philosophy 9 (1-2):7-23.
    The paper focuses on the embodied view of cognition applied to language. First we discuss what we intend when we say that concepts are “embodied”. Then we briefly explain the notion of simulation, addressing also its neuro-physiological basis. In the main part of the paper we will focus on concepts mediated by language, presenting behavioral and neuro-physiological evidence of the action/perception systems activation during words and sentences comprehension.
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  • Understanding and Sharing Intentions: The Origins of Cultural Cognition.Michael Tomasello, Malinda Carpenter, Josep Call, Tanya Behne & Henrike Moll - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):675-691.
    We propose that the crucial difference between human cognition and that of other species is the ability to participate with others in collaborative activities with shared goals and intentions: shared intentionality. Participation in such activities requires not only especially powerful forms of intention reading and cultural learning, but also a unique motivation to share psychological states with others and unique forms of cognitive representation for doing so. The result of participating in these activities is species-unique forms of cultural cognition and (...)
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  • The Embodied Mind Extended: Using Words as Social Tools.Anna M. Borghi, Claudia Scorolli, Daniele Caligiore, Gianluca Baldassarre & Luca Tummolini - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
  • The Midwife Case: Do They “Walk the Talk”? [REVIEW]Theresa S. S. Schilhab, Gudlaug Fridgeirsdottir & Peter Allerup - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):1-13.
    Expertise depends on hours and hours of practice within a field before a state of proficiency is achieved. Normally, expert skills involve bodily knowledge associated to the practices of a field. Interactional expertise, i.e. the ability to talk competently about the field, however, is not causally dependent on bodily proficiency. Instead, interactional experts are verbally skilled to an extent that makes them impossible to distinguish from so-called contributory experts, the experienced practitioners. The concept of interactional expertise defines linguistic skills as (...)
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  • On Derived Embodiment: A Response to Collins. [REVIEW]Theresa Schilhab - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):423-425.
    In derived embodiment, intangible phenomena become as-if tangible as a result of their almost promiscuous borrowing of corporeality from experiences of real objects.
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  • Derived Embodiment and Imaginative Capacities in Interactional Expertise.Theresa Schilhab - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):309-325.
    Interactional expertise is said to be a form of knowledge achieved in a linguistic community and, therefore, obtained entirely outside practice. Supposedly, it is not or only minimally sustained by the so-called embodied knowledge. Here, drawing upon studies in contemporary neuroscience and cognitive psychology, I propose that ‘derived’ embodiment is deeply involved in competent language use and, therefore, also in interactional expertise. My argument consists of two parts. First, I argue for a strong relationship among language acquisition, language use and (...)
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  • Interactional Expertise as a Third Kind of Knowledge.Harry Collins - 2004 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (2):125-143.
    Between formal propositional knowledge and embodied skill lies ‘interactional expertise’—the ability to converse expertly about a practical skill or expertise, but without being able to practice it, learned through linguistic socialisation among the practitioners. Interactional expertise is exhibited by sociologists of scientific knowledge, by scientists themselves and by a large range of other actors. Attention is drawn to the distinction between the social and the individual embodiment theses: a language does depend on the form of the bodies of its members (...)
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  • Ecological Pragmatics: Values, Dialogical Arrays, Complexity, and Caring.Bert Hodges - 2009 - Pragmatics and Cognition 17 (3):628-652.
    This paper explores the hypothesis that first-order linguistic activities are better understood in terms of ecological, values-realizing dynamics rather than in terms of rule-governed processes. Conversing, like other perception-action skills is constrained by multiple values, heterarchically organized. This hypothesis is explored in terms of three broad approaches that contrast with models of language which view it as a cognitive system: conversing as a perceptual system for exploring dialogical arrays ; conversing as an action system for integrating diverse space-time scales ; (...)
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  • Sound Symbolism Facilitates Early Verb Learning.Mutsumi Imai, Sotaro Kita, Miho Nagumo & Hiroyuki Okada - 2008 - Cognition 109 (1):54-65.
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  • Where Do Mirror Neurons Come From.Cecilia Heyes - forthcoming - Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews.
    1. Properties of mirror neurons in monkeys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (...)
     
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  • Three Dimensions of Expertise.Harry Collins - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):253-273.
    Psychologists and philosophers tend to treat expertise as a property of special individuals. These are individuals who have devoted much more time than the general population to the acquisition of their specific expertises. They are often said to pass through stages as they move toward becoming experts, for example, passing from an early stage, in which they follow self-conscious rules, to an expert stage in which skills are executed unconsciously. This approach is ‘one-dimensional’. Here, two extra dimensions are added. They (...)
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  • The Core of Expertise.Harry Collins - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):399-416.
    I reply to my critics in respect of my work on expertise. I define the 'core' of the multidisciplinary 'expertise studies'. I argue that those who have taken the work seriously could resolve their problems by paying more attention to the core. Each could have made good use of an aspect of the core.
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  • Interactional Expertise Through The Looking Glass: A Peek at Mirror Neurons.Theresa Schilhab - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):741-747.
    Interactional expertise is here to stay. Undoubtedly, in some sense of the word, one can attain a linguistic expert level within a field without full scale practical immersion. In the context of the idea of embodied cognition, the claim is provocative. How can an interactional expert acquire full linguistic competence without the simultaneous bodily engagement and real life interaction needed to get the language right? How can one understand the concept of hammering if one has never seen a hammer or (...)
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  • They Give You The Keys And Say ‘Drive It!’ Managers, Referred Expertise, And Other Expertises.Harry Collins & Gary Sanders - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (4):621-641.
    On the face of it, the directors of new large scientific projects have an impossible task. They have to make technical decisions about sciences in which they have never made a research contribution—sciences in which they have no contributory expertise. Furthermore, these decisions must be accepted and respected by the scientists who are making research contributions. The problem is discussed in two interviews conducted with two directors of large scientific projects. The paradox is resolved for the managers by their use (...)
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  • Are Abstract Action Words Embodied? An fMRI Investigation at the Interface Between Language and Motor Cognition.Katrin Sakreida, Claudia Scorolli, Mareike M. Menz, Stefan Heim, Anna M. Borghi & Ferdinand Binkofski - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  • Grounding Conceptual Knowledge in Modality-Specific Systems.Lawrence W. Barsalou, W. Kyle Simmons, Aron K. Barbey & Christine D. Wilson - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):84-91.
  • Experiments with Interactional Expertise.Harry Collins, Rob Evans, Rodrigo Ribeiro & Martin Hall - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (4):656-674.
    ‘Interactional expertise’ is developed through linguistic interaction without full scale practical immersion in a culture. Interactional expertise is the medium of communication in peer review in science, in review committees, and in interdisciplinary projects. It is also the medium of specialist journalists and of interpretative methods in the social sciences. We describe imitation game experiments designed to make concrete the idea of interactional expertise. The experiments show that the linguistic performance of those well socialized in the language of a specialist (...)
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  • Grasping Language – A Short Story on Embodiment☆.Doreen Jirak, Mareike M. Menz, Giovanni Buccino, Anna M. Borghi & Ferdinand Binkofski - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (3):711-720.
    The new concept of embodied cognition theories has been enthusiastically studied by the cognitive sciences, by as well as such disparate disciplines as philosophy, anthropology, neuroscience, and robotics. Embodiment theory provides the framework for ongoing discussions on the linkage between “low” cognitive processes as perception and “high” cognition as language processing and comprehension, respectively. This review gives an overview along the lines of argumentation in the ongoing debate on the embodiment of language and employs an ALE meta-analysis to illustrate and (...)
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  • Neural Perspectives on Interactional Expertise.Theresa Schilhab - 2011 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (7-8):7-8.
    How flexible is language? To what extent does language 'absorb' individual differences, for example physical interaction, in knowledge acquisition within a domain? Current neuropsychological findings show that conceptual knowledge is embodied. When reading the word 'cinnamon', supportive neural activity includes brain areas usually engaged in perceptual tasks. Such findings suggest that perceptual and somatosensory processes influence the conceptual knowledge of the competent language user. Here, I explore what I name the 'plasticity' of language, to hone in on characteristics of language, (...)
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