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  1. Review of Measurement Instruments in Clinical and Research Ethics, 1999-2003. [REVIEW]B. K. Redman - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (3):153-156.
    Every field of practice has the responsibility to evaluate its outcomes and to test its theories. Evidence of the underdevelopment of measurement instruments in bioethics suggests that attending to strengthening existing instruments and developing new ones will facilitate the interpretation of accumulating bodies of research as well as the making of clinical judgements. A review of 65 instruments reported in the published literature showed 10 with even a minimal level of psychometric data. Two newly developed instruments provide examples of the (...)
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  • Relationships Between the Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SORC) and Self-Reported Research Practices.A. Lauren Crain, Brian C. Martinson & Carol R. Thrush - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):835-850.
    The Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SORC) is a validated tool to facilitate promotion of research integrity and research best practices. This work uses the SORC to assess shared and individual perceptions of the research climate in universities and academic departments and relate these perceptions to desirable and undesirable research practices. An anonymous web- and mail-based survey was administered to randomly selected biomedical and social science faculty and postdoctoral fellows in the United States. Respondents reported their perceptions of the research (...)
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  • Development and Validation of the Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SORC).Brian C. Martinson, Carol R. Thrush & A. Lauren Crain - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):813-834.
    Development and targeting efforts by academic organizations to effectively promote research integrity can be enhanced if they are able to collect reliable data to benchmark baseline conditions, to assess areas needing improvement, and to subsequently assess the impact of specific initiatives. To date, no standardized and validated tool has existed to serve this need. A web- and mail-based survey was administered in the second half of 2009 to 2,837 randomly selected biomedical and social science faculty and postdoctoral fellows at 40 (...)
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