Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Phenomenology of Perception.Maurice Merleau-Ponty - 1962 - Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey: The Humanities Press.
    What makes this work so important is that it returned the body to the forefront of philosophy for the first time since Plato.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1115 citations  
  • Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Introduction.Edward Fullbrook & Kate Fullbrook - 1998 - Polity.
    This book provides the first comprehensive introduction to Simone de Beauvoir's philosophical thought. Beauvoir has long been recognized as the twentieth century's leading feminist writer, but the full extent of her significance as a philosopher is just coming into focus. This study examines the history of Beauvoir's development into one of the most original and influential thinkers of her era. The Fullbrooks begin with an account of Beauvoir's formation as a philosopher. They then explore her early writing on philosophical method (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Feminist Phenomenology.Linda Fisher & Lester Embree (eds.) - 2000 - Kluwer Academic Publishers, C.
    This volume is the first collection of original essays on the related issues of gender and feminism approached phenomenologically.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Black Skin, White Masks.Frantz Fanon - 1952 - Grove Press.
    A major influence on civil rights, anti-colonial, and black consciousness movements around the world, Black Skin, White Masks is the unsurpassed study of the black psyche in a white world. Hailed for its scientific analysis and poetic grace when it was first published in 1952, the book remains a vital force today. “[Fanon] demonstrates how insidiously the problem of race, of color, connects with a whole range of words and images.” — Robert Coles, The New York Times Book Review.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   240 citations  
  • Simone de Beauvoir: A Critical Introduction.Edward Fullbrook & Kate Fullbrook - 1998 - Wiley.
    This book provides the first comprehensive introduction to Simone de Beauvoir's philosophical thought. Beauvoir has long been recognized as the twentieth century's leading feminist writer, but the full extent of her significance as a philosopher is just coming into focus. This study examines the history of Beauvoir's development into one of the most original and influential thinkers of her era. The Fullbrooks begin with an account of Beauvoir's formation as a philosopher. They then explore her early writing on philosophical method (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Phenomenology of the Event: Waiting and Surprise.Françoise Dastur - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (4):178-189.
    How, asks Françoise Dastur, can philosophy account for the sudden happening and the factuality of the event? Dastur asks how phenomenology, in particular the work of Heidegger, Husserl, and Merleau-Ponty, may be interpreted as offering such an account. She argues that the "paradoxical capacity of expecting surprise is always in question in phenomenology," and for this reason, she concludes, "We should not oppose phenomenology and the thinking of the event. We should connect them; openness to phenomena must be identified with (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Playfulness, “World”-Travelling, and Loving Perception.María Lugones - 1987 - Hypatia 2 (2):3 - 19.
    A paper about cross-cultural and cross-racial loving that emphasizes the need to understand and affirm the plurality in and among women as central to feminist ontology and epistemology. Love is seen not as fusion and erasure of difference but as incompatible with them. Love reveals plurality. Unity-not to be confused with solidarity-is understood as conceptually tied to domination.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   137 citations  
  • The Voice on the Skin: Self-Mutilation and Merleau-Ponty's Theory of Language.Janice McLane - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (4):107-118.
    Self-mutilation is generally seen only as a negative response to trauma. But when trauma cannot be expressed, other forms of communication become necessary. As gestural communication, self-mutilation can reorganize and stabilize the trauma victim's world, providing a "voice on the skin" when the actual voice is forbidden. This is a plausible extension of Merleau-Ponty's gestural theory of language, and an interesting comment on his notion of "reversibility" as essential to linguistic communication.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • In Excess: The Body and the Habit of Sexual Difference.Rosalyn Diprose - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (3):156 - 171.
    Through a re-reading of Antigone, I offer a critique of Hegel's use of the story to illustrate the unity which emerges from the representation of sexual difference in ethical life. Using Hegel's own account of habits, as the mechanism by which the body becomes a sign of the self, I argue that the pretense of social unity assumes the proper construction and representation of one body only. This critique is brought to bear upon contemporary moves towards a post-Hegelian ethics of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Liberating Anger, Embodying Knowledge: A Comparative Study of María Lugones and Zen Master Hakuin.Jen McWeeny - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (2):295 - 315.
    This paper strengthens the theoretical ground of feminist analyses of anger by explaining how the angers of the oppressed are ways of knowing. Relying on insights created through the juxtaposition of Latina feminism and Zen Buddhism, I argue that these angers are special kinds of embodied perceptions that surface when there is a profound lack of fit between a particular bodily orientation and its framing world of sense. As openings to alternative sensibilities, these angers are transformative, liberatory, and deeply epistemohgical.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Sex and Existence: Simone de Beauvoir's the Second Sex.Eva Lundgren-Gothlin - 1996 - Wesleyan.
  • La Force de L''ge.Simone de Beauvoir - 1960 - Gallimard.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Beauvoir, Merleau-Ponty, and the Phenomenology of Relation.Eleanor Kaufman - 2003 - Bulletin de la Société Américaine de Philosophie de Langue Française 13 (1):68-77.
  • Borderlands/La Frontera The New Mestiza.Gloria Anzaldúa - 1987 - Aunt Lute Books.
    Rooted in Gloria Anzaldúa's experience as a Chicana, a lesbian, an activist, and a writer, the essays and poems in this volume profoundly challenged, and continue to challenge, how we think about identity.Borderlands / La Frontera remaps our understanding of what a "border" is, presenting it not as a simple divide between here and there, us and them, but as a psychic, social, and cultural terrain that we inhabit, and that inhabits all of us. This twenty-fifth anniversary edition features a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   125 citations  
  • The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Gendered Phenomenologies, Erotic Generosities.Debra Bergoffen - 1996 - State University of New York Press.
    Challenges Beauvoir's self-portrait and argues that she was a philosopher in her own right.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   49 citations  
  • Toward a Phenomenology of Sexual Difference: Husserl, Merleau-Ponty, Beauvoir.Sara Heinämaa - 2003 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Sara HeinSmaa rediscovers neglected passages of Le Duexi_me Sexe in her quest to follow Simone de Beauvoir's line of thinking. She finds the masterpiece to be grounded in the work of Husserl and Merleau-Ponty.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   62 citations  
  • Simone de Beauvoir's Philosophy of Lived Experience: Literature and Metaphysics.Eleanore Holveck - 2001 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In Simone de Beauvoir's Philosophy of Lived Experience, Eleanore Holveck presents Simone de Beauvoir's theory of literature and metaphysics, including its relationship to the philosophers Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Immanuel Kant, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Jean-Paul Sartre, with references to the literary tradition of Goethe, Maurice Barr_s, Arthur Rimbaud, AndrZ Breton, and Paul Nizan. The book provides a detailed philosophical analysis of Beauvoir's early short stories and several major novels, including The Mandarins and L'invitZe.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza.Gloria Anzaldúa - 1987 - Aunt Lute.
    Borderlands/La Frontera deals with the psychology of resistance to oppression. The possibility of resistance is revealed by perceiving the self in the process of being oppressed as another face of the self in the process of resisting oppression. The new mestiza consciousness is born from this interplay between oppression and resistance. Resistance is understood as social, collective activity, by adding to Anzaldúa's theory the distinction between the act and the process of resistance.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   153 citations  
  • She Came to Stay and Being and Nothingness.Edward Fullbrook - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):50 - 69.
    This essay, using works by Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Hazel Barnes, and Elizabeth Fallaize, documents the correspondence between the philosophical content of Beauvoir's She Came to Stay and Sartre's Being and Nothingness (both originally published in 1943). After reviewing the existential/phenomenological philosophical method, this paper examines the two philosophers' letters and diaries to show that Beauvoir wrote her book before Sartre wrote his and that the distinctive ideas and arguments the two works share originated with Beauvoir.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Phenomenology of the Event: Waiting and Surprise.Françoise Dastur - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (4):178-189.
    How, asks Françoise Dastur, can philosophy account for the sudden happening and the factuality of the event? Dastur asks how phenomenology, in particular the work of Heidegger, Husserl, and Merleau-Ponty, may be interpreted as offering such an account. She argues that the “paradoxical capacity of expecting surprise is always in question in phenomenology,” and for this reason, she concludes, “We should not oppose phenomenology and the thinking of the event. We should connect them; openness to phenomena must be identified with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Throwing Like a Girl: A Phenomenology of Feminine Body Comportment Motility and Spatiality.Iris Marion Young - 1980 - Human Studies 3 (1):137 - 156.
  • She Came to Stay and Being and Nothingness.Edward Fullbrook - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):50-69.
    This essay, using works by Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Hazel Barnes, and Elizabeth Fallaize, documents the correspondence between the philosophical content of Beauvoir's She Came to Stay and Sartre's Being and Nothingness. After reviewing the existential/phenomenological philosophical method, this paper examines the two philosophers’ letters and diaries to show that Beauvoir wrote her book before Sartre wrote his and that the distinctive ideas and arguments the two works share originated with Beauvoir.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Toward a Phenomenology of Feminist Consciousness.Sandra Lee Bartky - 1975 - Social Theory and Practice 3 (4):425-439.
  • From Murder to Morality: The Development of Beauvoir’s Ethics.Margaret A. Simons - 1999 - International Studies in Philosophy 31 (2):1-20.
  • Playfulness, “World”-Travelling, and Loving Perception.María Lugones - 1987 - Hypatia 2 (2):3-19.
    A paper about cross-cultural and cross-racial loving that emphasizes the need to understand and affirm the plurality in and among women as central to feminist ontology and epistemology. Love is seen not as fusion and erasure of difference but as incompatible with them. Love reveals plurality. Unity–not to be confused with solidarity–is understood as conceptually tied to domination.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   120 citations  
  • Sexual Difference, Phenomenology, and Alterity.Linda Fisher - 1999 - Philosophy Today 43 (9999):68-75.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Sexual Difference, Phenomenology, and Alterity.Linda Fisher - 1999 - Philosophy Today 43 (Supplement):68-75.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Beauvoir, Merleau-Ponty, and the Phenomenology of Relation.Eleanor Kaufman - 2001 - Bulletin de la Société Américaine de Philosophie de Langue Française 13 (1):68-77.
  • A Phenomenology of Gender.Johanna Oksala - 2006 - Continental Philosophy Review 39 (3):229-244.
    The article asks how phenomenology, understood as a philosophical method of investigation, can account for gender. Despite the fact that it has provided useful tools for feminist inquiry, the question remains how gender can be studied within the paradigm of a philosophy of a subject. The article explicates four different understandings of phenomenology and assesses their respective potential in terms of theorizing gender: a classical reading, a corporeal reading, an intersubjective reading and a post-phenomenological reading. It concludes by arguing that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Performative Acts and Gender Constitution: An Essay in Phenomenology and Feminist Theory.J. Butler - 1988 - Theatre Journal:519--531.
  • Reading Simone de Beauvoir with Martin Heidegger.Eva Gothlin - 2003 - In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press. pp. 45--65.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • 3 The Body as Instrument and as Expression.Sara Heinamaa - 2003 - In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press. pp. 66.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • 4 Beauvoir and Merleau-Ponty on Ambiguity.Monika Langer - 2003 - In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press. pp. 87.
  • Bergson's Influence on Beauvoir's Philosophical Methodology.Margaret A. Simons - 2003 - In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press. pp. 107-128.
    The topic of this chapter, the early philosophical influence of Henri Bergson (1859-1941) on Simone de Beauvoir, may surprise those who remember Beauvoir’s reference to Bergson in her Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter where she denies Bergson’s importance. She writes there of her interests in 1926: “I preferred literature to philosophy, and I would not have been at all pleased if someone had prophesized that I would become a kind of Bergson; I didn’t want to speak with that abstract voice (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Jealousy.Daniel M. Farrell - 1980 - Philosophical Review 89 (4):527-559.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Phenomenology of Perception.Aron Gurwitsch, M. Merleau-Ponty & Colin Smith - 1964 - Philosophical Review 73 (3):417.
  • La Phénoménologie de la Perception de Maurice Merleau-Ponty.Simone de Beauvoir - 2020 - Philosophie 1:7.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Simone de Beauvoir's L'Invitée: An Existentialist Melodrama.Toril Moi - 1991 - Paragraph 14 (2):151-169.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Sexual Ideology and Phenomenological Description.Judith Butler - 1989 - In Jeffner Allen & Iris Marion Young (eds.), The Thinking Muse: Feminism and Modern French Philosophy. Indiana University Press. pp. 85-100.
  • The Souls of Black Folk.W. E. B. DuBois - unknown
  • Jealousy.Michael J. Wreen - 1989 - Noûs 23 (5):635-652.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Beauvoir's Heideggerian Ontology.Nancy Bauer - 2006 - In Margaret A. Simons (ed.), The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Critical Essays. Indiana University Press.
  • La Phénoménologie de la Perception de Maurice Merleau-Ponty.Simone de Beauvoir - 1945 - Les Temps Modernes.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Killing Time: Simone de Beauvoir on Temporality and Mortality.Linnell Secomb - unknown
    Simone de Beauvoir's conception of temporality in her novel 'She Came to Stay' is influenced by her reading of Hegel, Heidegger and Bergson. While not explicit in the novel these influences form a background for Beauvoir's original conceptions of time that emerge in the characterisation, the phenomenological descriptions, the focalisations, and the structural devices employed. This article discusses three aspects of this temporalisation: the differing experiences of time represented by the two central characters Francoise and Xaviere; the emergence of a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Why Persons Need Jealousy.Kristján Kristjánsson - 1996 - The Personalist Forum 12 (2):163-181.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • A Review of The Phenomenology of Perception by Maurice Merleau-Ponty. [REVIEW]Simone de Beauvoir - 2004 - In Margaret A. Simons, Marybeth Timmermann & Mary Beth Mader (eds.), Philosophical Writings. University of Illinois Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • What is Feminist Phenomenology? Thinking Birth Philosophically.Johanna Oksala - 2004 - Radical Philosophy 126:16-22.
  • Jealous Thoughts.Jerome Neu - 1980 - In A. O. Rorty (ed.), Explaining Emotions. Univ of California Pr. pp. 425--463.
    Is jealousy eliminable? At what cost? Must it be pathological? Distinctions between jealousy and envy (and between malicious and admiring envy) are explored, as are the psychological and social roots of both. Jealousy need not be mere possessiveness, it may have more to do with self-identity, and envy should not be confused with legitimate resentment of injustice. The relations of jealousy to claims of right, to certain underlying fears, and to certain forms of love are considered.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Origins of Otherness: Nonconceptual Ethical Encounters in Beauvoir and Levinas.Jennifer McWeeny - 2009-2010 - Simone de Beauvoir Studies 26:5-17.