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  1. Should We Want God to Exist?Guy Kahane - 2011 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (3):674-696.
    Whether God exists is a metaphysical question. But there is also a neglected evaluative question about God’s existence: Should we want God to exist? Very many, including many atheists and agnostics, appear to think we should. Theists claim that if God didn’t exist things would be far worse, and many atheists agree; they regret God’s inexistence. Some remarks by Thomas Nagel suggest an opposing view: that we should want God not to exist. I call this view anti-theism. I explain how (...)
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  • Personal Anti-Theism and the Meaningful Life Argument.Myron A. Penner - 2015 - Faith and Philosophy 32 (3):325-337.
    In a recent paper, Guy Kahane asks whether God’s existence is something we should want to be true. Expanding on some cryptic remarks from Thomas Nagel, Kahane’s informative and wide-ranging piece eventually addresses whether personal anti-theism is justified, where personal anti-theism is the view that God’s existence would make things worse overall for oneself. In what follows, I develop, defend, but ultimately reject the Meaningful Life Argument, according to which if God’s existence precludes the realization of certain goods that seem (...)
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  • The Last Word.Thomas Nagel - 1999 - Philosophical Quarterly 49 (197):529-536.
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  • The Will Not to Believe.Joshua Cockayne & Jack Warman - 2019 - Sophia 58 (3):511-523.
    Is it permissible to believe that God does not exist if the evidence is inconclusive? In this paper, we give a new argument in support of atheistic belief modelled on William James’s The Will to Believe. According to James, if the evidence for a proposition, p, is ambiguous, and believing that p is a genuine option, then it can be permissible to let your passions decide. Typically, James’s argument has been used as a defence of passionally caused theistic belief. However, (...)
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  • The Will to Believe.W. James - 1896 - Philosophical Review 6:88.
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  • Anti-Theism and the Objective Meaningful Life Argument.Kirk Lougheed - 2017 - Dialogue 56 (2).
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  • On the Objective Meaningful Life Argument: A Response to Kirk Lougheed.Myron A. Penner - 2018 - Dialogue 57 (1):173-182.
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