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Moral Status and Agent-Centred Options

Utilitas 31 (1):83-105 (2019)

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  1. The Impotence of the Demandingness Objection.David Sobel - 2007 - Philosophers' Imprint 7:1-17.
    Consequentialism, many philosophers have claimed, asks too much of us to be a plausible ethical theory. Indeed, the theory's severe demandingness is often claimed to be its chief flaw. My thesis is that as we come to better understand this objection, we see that, even if it signals or tracks the existence of a real problem for Consequentialism, it cannot itself be a fundamental problem with the view. The objection cannot itself provide good reason to break with Consequentialism, because it (...)
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  • Philosophical Papers.Graeme Forbes & David Lewis - 1985 - Philosophical Review 94 (1):108.
  • Common Sense Morality and Consequentialism.Michael A. Slote - 1986 - Philosophical Quarterly 36 (144):399-412.
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  • Value Receptacles.Richard Yetter Chappell - 2015 - Noûs 49 (2):322-332.
    Utilitarianism is often rejected on the grounds that it fails to respect the separateness of persons, instead treating people as mere “receptacles of value”. I develop several different versions of this objection, and argue that, despite their prima facie plausibility, they are all mistaken. Although there are crude forms of utilitarianism that run afoul of these objections, I advance a new form of the view—‘token-pluralistic utilitarianism’—that does not.
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  • Normative Strength and the Balance of Reasons.Joshua Gert - 2007 - Philosophical Review 116 (4):533-562.
  • If This Is My Body … : A Defence of the Doctrine of Doing and Allowing.Fiona Woollard - 2013 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (3):315-341.
    I defend the Doctrine of Doing and Allowing: the claim that doing harm is harder to justify than merely allowing harm. A thing does not genuinely belong to a person unless he has special authority over it. The Doctrine of Doing and Allowing protects us against harmful imposition – against the actions or needs of another intruding on what is ours. This protection is necessary for something to genuinely belong to a person. The opponent of the Doctrine must claim that (...)
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  • Requiring and Justifying: Two Dimensions of Normative Strength. [REVIEW]Joshua Gert - 2003 - Erkenntnis 59 (1):5 - 36.
    Many contemporary accounts of normative reasons for action accord a single strength value to normative reasons. This paper first uses some examples to argue against such views by showing that they seem to commit us to intransitive or counterintuitive claims about the rough equivalence of the strengths of certain reasons. The paper then explains and defends an alternate account according to which normative reasons for action have two separable dimensions of strength: requiring strength, and justifying strength. Such an account explains (...)
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  • Getting Our Options Clear: A Closer Look at Agent-Centered Options.Paul Hurley - 1995 - Philosophical Studies 78 (2):163 - 188.
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  • Autonomy or Integrity: A Reply to Slote.Margaret Urban Walker - 1989 - Philosophical Papers 18 (3):253-263.
  • Morality and Self-Other Asymmetry.Michael Slote - 1984 - Journal of Philosophy 81 (4):179-192.
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  • Actions, Intentions, and Consequences: The Doctrine of Doing and Allowing.Warren S. Quinn - 1989 - Philosophical Review 98 (3):287-312.
  • Review: Non-Consequentialism, the Person as an End-in-Itself, and the Significance of Status. [REVIEW]Frances Kamm - 1992 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 21 (4):354 - 389.
  • Defending Moral OptionsThe Limits of Morality.Dan W. Brock & Shelly Kagan - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (4):909.
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  • Review: Defending Moral Options. [REVIEW]Dan W. Brock - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (4):909 - 913.
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  • Defending Moral Options. [REVIEW]Dan W. Brock - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (4):909-913.
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  • Famine, Affluence, and Morality.Peter Singer - 1972 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (3):229-243.
    As I write this, in November 1971, people are dying in East Bengal from lack of food, shelter, and medical caxc. The suffering and death that are occurring there now axe not inevitable, 1101; unavoidable in any fatalistic sense of the term. Constant poverty, a cyclone, and a civil war have turned at least nine million people into destitute refugees; nevertheless, it is not beyond Lhe capacity of the richer nations to give enough assistance to reduce any further suffering to (...)
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  • The Supererogatory, the Foolish and the Morally Required.Barry Curtis - 1981 - Journal of Value Inquiry 15 (4):311-318.
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  • A Theory of Justice.John Rawls - unknown
    Though the revised edition of A Theory of Justice, published in 1999, is the definitive statement of Rawls's view, so much of the extensive literature on Rawls's theory refers to the first edition.
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  • The Consequentialist Perspective.Philip Pettit - 1997 - In M. Baron, P. Pettit & M. Slote (eds.), Three Methods of Ethics. Blackwell.
  • Value in Ethics and Economics.Paul Seabright - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (2):303.
  • Selflessness and the Loss of Self.Jean Hampton - 1993 - Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (1):135-16.
    Sacrificing one's own interests in order to serve another is, in general, supposed to be a good thing, an example of altruism, the hallmark of morality, and something we should commend to (but not always require of) the entirely-too-selfish human beings of our society. But let me recount a story that I hope will persuade the reader to start questioning this conventional philosophical wisdom. Last year, a friend of mine was talking with me about a mutual acquaintance whose two sons (...)
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  • Moral Autonomy and Agent-Centred Options.Seana Valentine Shiffrin - 1991 - Analysis 51 (4):244 - 254.
  • The Demands of Consequentialism.Timothy Chappell - 2002 - Mind 111 (444):891-897.
  • Supererogation.Douglas N. Walton - 1985 - Noûs 19 (2):284-288.
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  • Actions, Intentions, and Consequences: The Doctrine of Double Effect.Warren S. Quinn - 1989 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (4):334-351.
    Stable URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0048-3915%28198923%2918%3A4%3C334%3AAIACTD%3E2.0.CO%3B2-P..
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  • The Supererogatory, and How to Accommodate It.Dale Dorsey - 2013 - Utilitas 25 (3):355-382.
    Many find it plausible to posit a category of supererogatory actions. But the supererogatory resists easy analysis. Traditionally, supererogatory actions are characterized as actions that are morally good, but not morally required; actions that go the call of our moral obligations. As I shall argue in this article, however, the traditional analysis can be accepted only by a view with troubling consequences concerning the structure of the moral point of view. I propose a different analysis that is extensionally correct, avoids (...)
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  • Kagan on "the Appeal to Cost".Michael E. Bratman - 1994 - Ethics 104 (2):325-332.
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  • Kagan on Requirements: Mill on Sanctions.Jeremy Waldron - 1994 - Ethics 104 (2):310-324.
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  • Defending Options.Shelly Kagan - 1994 - Ethics 104 (2):333-351.
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  • Killing in Self‐Defense.Jonathan Quong - 2009 - Ethics 119 (3):507-537.
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