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Logic and Divine Simplicity

Philosophy Compass 6 (4):282-294 (2011)

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  1. Perspectives on the Philosophy of William P. Alston.William P. Alston, Carl Ginet, Alvin I. Goldman, John Greco, George I. Mavrodes, Philip L. Quinn, Alessandra Tanesini, Nicholas Wolterstorff, Linda Zagzebski & Laurence BonJour - 2005 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    One of the most influential analytic philosophers of the late twentieth century, William P. Alston is a leading light in epistemology, philosophy of religion, and the philosophy of language. In this volume, twelve leading philosophers critically discuss the central topics of his work in these areas, including perception, epistemic circularity, justification, the problem of religious diversity, and truth.
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  • Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy.Brian Leftow - 1998 - Routledge.
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  • Mathematical Logic.Willard Van Orman Quine - 1940 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    INTRODUCTION MATHEMATICAL logic differs from the traditional formal logic so markedly in method, and so far surpasses it in power and subtlety, ...
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  • Logic and Theism: Arguments for and Against Beliefs in God.Jordan Howard Sobel - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a wide-ranging 2004 book about arguments for and against beliefs in God. The arguments for the belief are analysed in the first six chapters and include ontological arguments from Anselm to Gödel, the cosmological arguments of Aquinas and Leibniz, and arguments from evidence for design and miracles. The next two chapters consider arguments against belief. The last chapter examines Pascalian arguments for and against belief in God. There are discussions of Cantorian problems for omniscience, of challenges to divine (...)
  • Does God Have a Nature?Alvin Plantinga - 1962 - Marquette University Press.
    Sets of contingent objects, perhaps, are as contingent as their members; but properties, propositions, numbers and states of affairs, it seems, are objects whose non-existence is quite impossible. If so, however, how are they related to God? Suppose God has a nature: a property he has essentially that includes each property essential to him. Does God have a nature? And if he does, is there a conflict between God's sovereignty and his having a nature? How is God related to such (...)
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  • The Frege Reader.Gottlob Frege & Michael Beaney (eds.) - 1997 - Oxford, England: Blackwell.
    This is the first single-volume edition and translation of Frege's philosophical writings to include his seminal papers as well as substantial selections from ...
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  • An introduction to the philosophy of religion.Brian Davies - 2021 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    A deep and precise introduction to the philosophy of religion that is also remarkably clear and insightful. The author has a conversation with the student and uses concrete examples to explain often abstract concepts and issues.
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  • Summa Theologica.Thomasn D. Aquinas - 1274 - Hayes Barton Press.
  • Divine Nature and Human Language: Essays in Philosophical Theology.William P. Alston (ed.) - 1989 - Cornell University Press.
  • Divine Simplicity: A New Defense.William F. Vallicella - 1992 - Faith and Philosophy 9 (4):508-525.
    The doctrine of divine simplicity, according to which God is devoid of physical or metaphysical complexity, is widely believed to be incoherent. I argue that although two prominent recent attempts to defend it fail, it can be defended against the charge of obvious incoherence. The defense rests on the isolation and rejection of a crucial assumption, namely, that no property is an individual. I argue that there is nothing in our ordinary concepts of property and individual to warrant the assumption, (...)
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  • Absolute Simplicity.Eleonore Stump & Norman Kretzmann - 1985 - Faith and Philosophy 2 (4):353-382.
    The doctrine of God’s absolute simplicity denies the possibility of real distinctions in God. It is, e.g., impossible that God have any kind of parts or any intrinsic accidental properties, or that there be real distinctions among God’s essential properties or between any of them and God himself. After showing that some of the counter-intuitive implications of the doctrine can readily be made sense of, the authors identify the apparent incompatibility of God’s simplicity and God’s free choice as a special (...)
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  • On God and Mann: A View of Divine Simplicity.Thomas V. Morris - 1985 - Religious Studies 21 (3):299 - 318.
    One of the most difficult and perplexing tenets of classical theism is the doctrine of divine simplicity. Broadly put, this is generally understood to be the thesis that God is altogether without any proper parts, composition, or metaphysical complexity whatsoever. For a good deal more than a millennium, veritable armies of philosophical theologians – Jewish, Christian and Islamic – proclaimed the truth and importance of divine simplicity. Yet in our own time, the doctrine has enjoyed no such support. Among many (...)
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  • On God and Mann: A View of Divine Simplicity: THOMAS V. MORRIS.Thomas V. Morris - 1985 - Religious Studies 21 (3):299-318.
    One of the most difficult and perplexing tenets of classical theism is the doctrine of divine simplicity. Broadly put, this is generally understood to be the thesis that God is altogether without any proper parts, composition, or metaphysical complexity whatsoever. For a good deal more than a millennium, veritable armies of philosophical theologians – Jewish, Christian and Islamic – proclaimed the truth and importance of divine simplicity. Yet in our own time, the doctrine has enjoyed no such support. Among many (...)
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  • Dependence and divine simplicity.Thomas V. Morris - 1988 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 23 (3):161 - 174.
  • Simplicity and Properties: A Reply to Morris.William E. Mann - 1986 - Religious Studies 22 (3-4):343 - 353.
  • Simplicity and Properties: A Reply to Morris: WILLIAM E. MANN.William E. Mann - 1986 - Religious Studies 22 (3-4):343-353.
    The doctrine of divine simplicity, the doctrine that God has no physical or metaphysical complexity whatsoever, is not a doctrine designed to induce immediate philosophical acquiescence. There are severe questions about its coherence. And even if those questions can be answered satisfactorily in favour of the doctrine, there remains the question why anyone should accept it. Thomas V. Morris raises both sorts of questions about a version of the doctrine which I have put forward. In the following pages I shall (...)
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  • Divine Simplicity.William E. Mann - 1982 - Religious Studies 18 (4):451 - 471.
    In The City of God, XI, 10, St Augustine claims that the divine nature is simple because ‘it is what it has’ (quod habet hoc est). We may take this as a slogan for the Doctrine of Divine Simplicity (DDS), a doctrine which finds its way into orthodox medieval Christian theological speculation. Like the doctrine of God's timeless eternality, the DDS has seemed obvious and pious to many, and incoherent, misguided, and repugnant to others. Unlike the doctrine of God's timeless (...)
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  • Divine Simplicity: WILLIAM E. MANN.William E. Mann - 1982 - Religious Studies 18 (4):451-471.
    In The City of God , XI, 10, St Augustine claims that the divine nature is simple because ‘it is what it has’ . We may take this as a slogan for the Doctrine of Divine Simplicity , a doctrine which finds its way into orthodox medieval Christian theological speculation. Like the doctrine of God's timeless eternality, the DDS has seemed obvious and pious to many, and incoherent, misguided, and repugnant to others. Unlike the doctrine of God's timeless eternality, the (...)
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  • Is God an abstract object?Brian Leftow - 1990 - Noûs 24 (4):581-598.
    Before Duns Scotus, most philosophers agreed that God is identical with His necessary intrinsic attributes--omnipotence, omniscience, etc. This Identity Thesis was a component of widely held doctrines of divine simplicity, which stated that God exemplifies no metaphysical distinctions, including that between subject and attribute. The Identity Thesis seems to render God an attribute, an abstract object. This paper shows that the Identity Thesis follows from a basic theistic belief and does not render God abstract. If also discusses how one might (...)
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  • Grundzuge der Theoretischen Logik.David Hilbert & Wilhelm Ackermann - 1928 - Springer Verlag.
    Die theoretische Logik, auch mathematische oder symbolische Logik genannt, ist eine Ausdehnung der fonnalen Methode der Mathematik auf das Gebiet der Logik. Sie wendet fUr die Logik eine ahnliche Fonnel­ sprache an, wie sie zum Ausdruck mathematischer Beziehungen schon seit langem gebrauchlich ist. In der Mathematik wurde es heute als eine Utopie gelten, wollte man beim Aufbau einer mathematischen Disziplin sich nur der gewohnlichen Sprache bedienen. Die groBen Fortschritte, die in der Mathematik seit der Antike gemacht worden sind, sind zum (...)
  • A Brief History of Natural Deduction.Francis Jeffry Pelletier - 1999 - History and Philosophy of Logic 20 (1):1-31.
    Natural deduction is the type of logic most familiar to current philosophers, and indeed is all that many modern philosophers know about logic. Yet natural deduction is a fairly recent innovation in logic, dating from Gentzen and Ja?kowski in 1934. This article traces the development of natural deduction from the view that these founders embraced to the widespread acceptance of the method in the 1960s. I focus especially on the different choices made by writers of elementary textbooks?the standard conduits of (...)
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  • Principia Mathematica.Morris R. Cohen - 1912 - Philosophical Review 21 (1):87.
  • The divine simplicity.Daniel Bennett - 1969 - Journal of Philosophy 66 (19):628-637.
  • Theism, fideism, atheism, agnosticism.Jan Woleński - 2009 - In Lars-Göran Johansson, Jan Österberg, Rysiek Śliwiński & Jordan Howard Sobel (eds.), Logic, Ethics and All That Jazz: Essays in Honour of Jordan Howard Sobel. Dept. Of Philosophy, Uppsala University. pp. 387--400.
     
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  • Grundzüge der theoretischen Logik.D. Hilbert & W. Ackermann - 1928 - Annalen der Philosophie Und Philosophischen Kritik 7:157-157.
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