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  1. A Defense of Abortion.Judith Jarvis Thomson - 1971 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (1):47-66.
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  • On Virtue Ethics.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    Virtue ethics is perhaps the most important development within late twentieth-century moral philosophy. Rosalind Hursthouse, who has made notable contributions to this development, here presents a full exposition and defense of her neo-Aristotelian version of virtue ethics. She shows how virtue ethics can provide guidance for action, illuminate moral dilemmas, and bring out the moral significance of the emotions.
     
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  • Causing Death and Saving Lives.Jonathan Glover (ed.) - 1957 - Penguin.
    This is the earliest critical discussion in the context of modern/contemporary philosophy in the analytical tradition arguing that somebody with a reasonably stable character and the company of the right people would be able to enjoy eternity .
     
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  • Abortion and the Ways We Value Human Life.Jeffrey Reiman - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In Abortion and the Ways We Value Human Life, Jeffrey Reiman argues that an overlooked clue to the solution of the moral problem of abortion lies in the unusual way in which we value the lives of individual human beings_namely, that we value them irreplaceably. We think it is not only wrong to kill an innocent child or adult, but that it would not be made right by replacing the dead one with another living one, or even several. Reiman argues (...)
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  • A Defense of Abortion.David Boonin - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    David Boonin has written the most thorough and detailed case for the moral permissibility of abortion yet published. Critically examining a wide range of arguments that attempt to prove that every human fetus has a right to life, he shows that each of these arguments fails on its own terms. He then explains how even if the fetus does have a right to life, abortion can still be shown to be morally permissible on the critique of abortion's own terms. Finally (...)
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  • Locating the Beginnings of Pain.Stuart W. G. Derbyshire - 1999 - Bioethics 13 (1):1–31.
  • Arguing From Potential.Stephen Buckle - 1988 - Bioethics 2 (3):227–253.
  • When Did You First Begin to Feel It? — Locating the Beginning of Human Consciousness.J. A. Burgess & S. A. Tawia - 1996 - Bioethics 10 (1):1-26.
    In this paper we attempt to sharpen and to provide an answer to the question of when human beings first become conscious. Since it is relatively uncontentious that a capacity for raw sensation precedes and underpins all more sophisticated mental capacities, our question is tantamount to asking when human beings first have experiences with sensational content. Two interconnected features of our argument are crucial. First, we argue that experiences with sensational content are supervenient on facts about electrical activity in the (...)
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  • When Did You First Begin to Feel It?John A. Burgess & S. A. Tawia - 1996 - Locating the Beginnings of Human Consciousness? Bioethics 10 (1):1-26.
    In this paper we attempt to sharpen and to provide an answer to the question of when human beings first become conscious. Since it is relatively uncontentious that a capacity for raw sensation precedes and underpins all more sophisticated mental capacities, our question is tantamount to asking when human beings first have experiences with sensational content. Two interconnected features of our argument are crucial. First, we argue that experiences with sensational content are supervenient on facts about electrical activity in the (...)
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  • A Defense of Women’s Choice: Abortion and the Ethics of Care.Eugenie Gatens-Robinson - 1992 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):39-66.
  • Beginning Lives.Ian Tipton - 1988 - Philosophical Books 29 (4):231-234.
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  • Virtue Theory and Abortion.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1997 - In Roger Crisp & Michael Slote (eds.), Virtue Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  • Virtue Theory and Abortion.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1991 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 20 (3):223-246.
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  • Abortion: Approaches From Virtue.Eric M. Rovie - unknown
    I will argue that virtue ethics, because of its emphasis on the character and motives of the agent, is able to help guide action and, in fact, is far better equipped to explain the moral responses in the gray area than utilitarianism. I divide this essay into four sections. In the first, I avoid having to answer the troublesome question about when a set of cells becomes a person by applying a tactic first used by R. A Hare. Second, using (...)
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  • Abortion and Infanticide.Michael Tooley - 1972 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 2 (1):37-65.
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  • Abortion Through a Feminist Ethics Lens.Susan Sherwin - 1991 - Dialogue 30 (3):327-.
  • The Standing is Slippery.Michael J. Wreen - 2004 - Philosophy 79 (4):553-572.
    This paper is a critical examination of the so-called slippery slope argument for the conservative position on abortion. The argument was discussed in the philosophic literature some time back, but has since fallen into disfavor. The argument is first exposed and a general objection to it is advanced, then rebutted. Rosalind Hursthouse's more detailed and stronger objection is next aired, but also found less than convincing. In the course of discussing her objection, the correct form of the argument is identified, (...)
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  • The Moral Status of Preembryos, Embryos, Fetuses, and Infants.C. Strong - 1997 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (5):457-478.
    Some have argued that embryos and fetuses have the moral status of personhood because of certain criteria that are satisfied during gestation. However, these attempts to base personhood during gestation on intrinsic characteristics have uniformly been unsuccessful. Within a secular framework, another approach to establishing a moral standing for embryos and fetuses is to argue that we ought to confer some moral status upon them. There appear to be two main approaches to defending conferred moral standing; namely, consequentialist and contractarian (...)
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  • Beginning Lives.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1992 - Noûs 26 (1):134-137.
    In this text book Rosalind Hursthouse examines the complex questions surrounding the morality of abortion. Beginning by discussing the moral status of the foetus, she outlines and criticizes the main philosophical liberal positions on abortion, discussing alsl their bearing on the related issues of ifanticide, foetal research, surrogacy, murder and our treatment of animals. In place of the currently prevailing positions, the author offers a novel approach to these issues based on the recently revived theory of neo–Aristotelianism which emphasizes moral (...)
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  • Robert Stevens on Offers.Christine Swanton - 1989 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67 (4):472 – 475.
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  • Abortion and Infanticide.Michael Tooley - 1984 - Philosophy 59 (230):545-547.
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  • Ontogenesis of the Brain in the Human Organism: Definitions of Life and Death of the Human Being and Person.Julius Korein - 1997 - Advances in Bioethics 2:1-74.
     
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  • Neuromaturation of the Human Fetus.Michael J. Flower - 1985 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (3):237-252.
    The fetal human possesses an active central nervous system from at least the eighth week of development. Until mid-gestation the most significant center of activity is the brainstem. By the end of the first trimester, it appears that the brainstem could be acting as a rudimentary modulator of sensory information and motor activity. What importance ought to be attached to such regulatory activity is uncertain. Some argue that it represents a level of integrated activity sufficient to bolster an argument for (...)
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  • Moral Status in Virtue Ethics.John Hacker-Wright - 2007 - Philosophy 82 (3):449-473.
    My contention is that virtue ethics offers an important critique of traditional philosophical conceptions of moral status as well as an alternative view of important moral issues held to depend on moral status. I argue that the scope of entities that deserve consideration depends on our conception of the demands of virtues like justice; which entities deserve consideration emerges from a moral view of a world shaped by that conception. The deepest disputes about moral status depend on conflicting conceptions of (...)
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