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  1. Ontological Dependence: An Opinionated Survey.Kathrin Koslicki - 2013 - In Benjamin Schnieder, Miguel Hoeltje & Alex Steinberg (eds.), Varieties of Dependence: Ontological Dependence, Grounding, Supervenience, Response-Dependence (Basic Philosophical Concepts). Philosophia Verlag. pp. 31-64.
    This essay provides an opinionated survey of some recent developments in the literature on ontological dependence. Some of the most popular definitions of ontological dependence are formulated in modal terms; others in non-modal terms (e.g., in terms of the explanatory connective, ‘because’, or in terms of a non-modal conception of essence); some (viz., the existential construals of ontological dependence) emphasise requirements that must be met in order for an entity to exist; others (viz., the essentialist construals) focus on conditions that (...)
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  • Substance and Independence in Aristotle.Phil Corkum - 2013 - In B. Schnieder, A. Steinberg & M. Hoeltje (eds.), Varieties of Dependence: Ontological Dependence, Supervenience, and Response-Dependence. Basic Philosophical Concepts Series, Philosophia Verlag. pp. 36-67.
    Individual substances are the ground of Aristotle’s ontology. Taking a liberal approach to existence, Aristotle accepts among existents entities in such categories other than substance as quality, quantity and relation; and, within each category, individuals and universals. As I will argue, individual substances are ontologically independent from all these other entities, while all other entities are ontologically dependent on individual substances. The association of substance with independence has a long history and several contemporary metaphysicians have pursued the connection. In this (...)
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  • Aristotle on Ontological Dependence.Phil Corkum - 2008 - Phronesis 53 (1):65 - 92.
    Aristotle holds that individual substances are ontologically independent from nonsubstances and universal substances but that non-substances and universal substances are ontologically dependent on substances. There is then an asymmetry between individual substances and other kinds of beings with respect to ontological dependence. Under what could plausibly be called the standard interpretation, the ontological independence ascribed to individual substances and denied of non-substances and universal substances is a capacity for independent existence. There is, however, a tension between this interpretation and the (...)
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  • Demonstrative Science and the Science of Being Qua Being.Kyle Fraser - 2002 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Volume Xxii: Summer 2002. Oxford University Press.
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  • Aristotle and Crossing the Boundaries Between the Sciences.Lindsay Judson - 2019 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 101 (2):177-204.
    On the basis of what Aristotle says in the Posterior Analytics about how sciences are differentiated and about the impermissibility of ‘kind-crossing’, many commentators suppose that when it comes to his scientific practice, Aristotle treats the boundaries of the sciences as impermeable, so that if subject-matter X is the business of one science, it simply cannot be the business of another. I call this the impermeable boundary theory of the sciences: knowledge is divided into watertight compartments, determined by their distinct (...)
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  • Aristotelian Revisions: The Case of de Sensu.M. F. Burnyeat - 2004 - Apeiron 37 (2):177-180.
  • Aristotelian Revisions: The Case of "de Sensu".M. F. Burnyeat - 2004 - Apeiron 37 (2):177 - 180.
  • Multiplicity and Unity of Being in Aristotle.E. Berti - 2001 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 101:185-208.
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  • The Structure and Subject of Metaphysics Λ.Helen Lang - 1993 - Phronesis 38 (3):257-280.
  • The Structure and Subject of Metaphysics Λ.Helen Lang - 1993 - Phronesis 38 (3):257 - 280.
  • The Platonism of Aristotle.G. E. L. Owen - 1967
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  • Pure Form in Aristotle.Eugene E. Ryan - 1973 - Phronesis 18 (3):209-224.
  • Aristotle on Focal Meaning and the Unity of Science.Michael T. Ferejohn - 1980 - Phronesis 25 (1):117-128.
  • Particular Forms Revisited. [REVIEW]Michael Woods - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (1):75 - 87.
  • The Editors of the Metaphysics.Stephen Menn - 1995 - Phronesis 40 (2):202-208.
  • What Does Aristotle Mean by Priority in Substance?Stephen Makin - 2003 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Volume Xxiv: Summer 2003. Oxford University Press.
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  • The Causal Priority of Form in Aristotle.Kathrin Koslicki - 2014 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 7 (2):113.
    In various texts, Aristotle assigns priority to form, in its role as a principle and cause, over matter and the matter-form compound. Given the central role played by this claim in Aristotle's search for primary substance in the Metaphysics, it is important to understand what motivates him in locating the primary causal responsibility for a thing's being what it is with the form, rather than the matter. According to Met. Theta.8, actuality [ energeia / entelecheia ] in general is prior (...)
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  • First Philosophy and the Kinds of Substance.Joseph G. DeFilippo - 1998 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (1):1-28.
    First Philosophy and the Kinds of Substance JOSEPH G. DEFILIPPO ON A CERTAIN INTERPRETATION Aristotle's Metaphysics contains two incompati- ble conceptions of metaphysics or, as he calls it, first philosophy. At two points in the treatise he identifies first philosophy with theology . Along with this identification comes a certain view about the nature and number of theoretical sciences. We are told in E. 1 that there are three: natural philosophy, mathematics, and theology. Natural philosophy deals with nonseparate,' mutable substance, (...)
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  • Life and Work.Jonathan Barnes - 1995 - In The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle. Cambridge University Press. pp. 1--26.
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