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  1. Japanese Civilization: A Comparative View.Anne Walthall & S. N. Eisenstadt - 1999 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 119 (2):362.
  • Technological World‐Pictures.John Tresch - 2007 - Isis 98:84-99.
    Martin Heidegger’s notion of things as gatherings that disclose a world conveys the “thickness” of everyday objects. This essay extends his discussion of things—part of a sustained criticism of modern technology—to technological objects as well. As a corrective to his totalizing, even totalitarian, generalizations about “enframing” and “the age of the world‐picture,” and to a more widespread tendency among critics of modernity to present technology in only the most dystopian, uniform, and claustrophobic terms, this essay explores two species of technical (...)
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  • Technological World‐Pictures.John Tresch - 2007 - Isis 98 (1):84-99.
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  • Love in the Time of Tamagotchi.Dominic Pettman - 2009 - Theory, Culture and Society 26 (2-3):189-208.
    There is a popular conception among many Zeitgeist watchers, especially in places like the US, Western Europe and Australia, of the urbanized East as existing somehow further into the future. As William Gibson once stated: `The future is here; it just isn't equally distributed yet.' This kind of cultural fetishism extends to not only technolust, but the practices that new gadgets and electronics encourage. The specific phenomenon explored in this article is that of virtual girlfriends and boyfriends: whether in the (...)
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  • Introduction: Regarding Change at Ise Jingū.Jeffrey M. Perl - 2008 - Common Knowledge 14 (2):208-220.
  • Subject Umwelt Society: The Triad of Living Beings.Yoshimi Kawade - 2001 - Semiotica 2001 (134):815-828.
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  • On the Nature of the Subjectivity of Living Things.Yoshimi Kawade - 2009 - Biosemiotics 2 (2):205-220.
    A biosemiotic view of living things is presented that supersedes the mechanistic view of life prevalent in biology today. Living things are active agents with autonomous subjectivity, whose structure is triadic, consisting of the individual organism, its Umwelt and the society. Sociality inheres in every living thing since the very origin of life on the earth. The temporality of living things is guided by the purpose to live, which works as the semantic boundary condition for the processes of embodiment of (...)
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  • Introduction: Contexts for a Comparative Relativism.Casper Bruun Jensen, Barbara Herrnstein Smith, G. E. R. Lloyd, Martin Holbraad, Andreas Roepstorff, Isabelle Stengers, Helen Verran, Steven D. Brown, Brit Ross Winthereik, Marilyn Strathern, Bruce Kapferer, Annemarie Mol, Morten Axel Pedersen, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Matei Candea, Debbora Battaglia & Roy Wagner - 2011 - Common Knowledge 17 (1):1-12.
    This introduction to the Common Knowledge symposium titled “Comparative Relativism” outlines a variety of intellectual contexts where placing the unlikely companion terms comparison and relativism in conjunction offers analytical purchase. If comparison, in the most general sense, involves the investigation of discrete contexts in order to elucidate their similarities and differences, then relativism, as a tendency, stance, or working method, usually involves the assumption that contexts exhibit, or may exhibit, radically different, incomparable, or incommensurable traits. Comparative studies are required to (...)
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  • The Varieties of Religious Experience.William James - 1903 - Philosophical Review 12 (1):62-67.
  • Animism, Fetishism, and Objectivism as Strategies for Knowing (or Not Knowing) the World.Alf Hornborg - unknown
    Animistic or 'relational' ontologies encountered in non-Western settings pose a challenge to Western knowledge production, as they violate fundamentalassumptions of Cartesian science. Naturalscientists who have tried seriously to incorporate subject-subject relations into their intellectual practice have inexorably been relegated to the margins. Surrounded by philosophers and sociologists of science announcing the end of Cartesian objectivism, however,late modern or 'post-modern' anthropologists discussing animistic understandings of nature will be excused for taking them more seriously than their predecessors. It is incumbent on them (...)
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  • Zeno and the Art of Anthropology of Lies, Beliefs, Paradoxes, and Other Truths.Eduardo Viveiros de Castro - 2011 - Common Knowledge 17 (1):128-145.
    The article assumes that the expression “comparative relativism”—the title of the Common Knowledge symposium in which the essay appears—is neither tautological nor oxymoronic. Rather, the author construes the term as an apt synthetic characterization of anthropology and illustrates that idea by means of four quotations, taken from authors as different as Richard Rorty and David Schneider, Marcel Mauss and Henri Michaux. The quotations can be said to “exemplify” anthropology in terms that are interestingly (and diversely) restrictive: some of them amount (...)
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  • Exchanging Perspectives.Eduardo Viveiros de Castro - 2004 - Common Knowledge 10 (3):463-484.
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  • Uncommon Ground: Toward Reinventing Nature.William Cronon - 1997 - Journal of the History of Biology 30 (2):291-302.
  • War of the Whales: Post-Sovereign Science and Agonistic Cosmopolitics in Japanese-Global Whaling Assemblages.Anders Blok - 2011 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 36 (1):55-81.
    This article examines some of the difficulties of universalistic science in situations of deep conflict over global nature, using empirical material pertaining to ongoing controversies in the context of Japanese whaling practices. Within global-scale whaling assemblages since the 1970s, science has become a ‘‘post-sovereign’’ authority, unable to impose any stable definition of nature on all actors. Instead, across spaces of deep antagonistic differences, anti- and pro-whalers now ontologically enact a multiplicity of mutually irreconcilable versions of whales. Empirically, the article attempts (...)
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