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  1. In Defense of Kant's Religion.Chris L. Firestone & Nathan Jacobs - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 66 (3):167-171.
     
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  • Speak No Evil?1.Eve Garrard & David McNaughton - 2012 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):1-17.
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  • Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals.Immanuel Kant - 1996 - In Practical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 37-108.
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  • Kant on the Radical Evil of Human Nature.Paul Formosa - 2007 - Philosophical Forum 38 (3):221–245.
    In ‘Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason’ Kant presents his thesis that human nature is ‘radically evil’. To be radically evil is to have a propensity toward moral frailty, impurity and even perversity. Kant claims that all humans are ‘by nature’ radically evil. By presenting counter-examples of moral saints, I argue that not all humans are morally corrupt, even if most are. Even so, the possibility of moral failure is central to what makes us human.
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  • Kant at Auschwitz.John R. Silber - 1991 - Proceedings of the Sixth International Kant Congress 1:177-211.
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  • Delusions of Virtue: Kant on Self-Conceit.Kate Moran - 2014 - Kantian Review 19 (3):419-447.
    Little extended attention has been given to Kant's notion of self-conceit, though it appears throughout his theoretical and practical philosophy. Authors who discuss self-conceit often describe it as a kind of imperiousness or arrogance in which the conceited agent seeks to impose selfish principles upon others, or sees others as worthless. I argue that these features of self-conceit are symptoms of a deeper and more thoroughgoing failure. Self-conceit is best described as the tendency to insist upon one to oneself or (...)
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  • Evil and Incomprehensibility.Luke Russell - 2012 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):62-73.
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  • Kant's Argument for Radical Evil.Stephen R. Grimm - 2002 - European Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):160–177.
  • Is Evil Just Very Wrong?Todd Calder - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 163 (1):177-196.
    Is evil a distinct moral concept? Or are evil actions just very wrong actions? Some philosophers have argued that evil is a distinct moral concept. These philosophers argue that evil is qualitatively distinct from ordinary wrongdoing. Other philosophers have suggested that evil is only quantitatively distinct from ordinary wrongdoing. On this view, evil is just very wrong. In this paper I argue that evil is qualitatively distinct from ordinary wrongdoing. The first part of the paper is critical. I argue that (...)
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  • A Conception of Evil.Paul Formosa - 2008 - Journal of Value Inquiry 42 (2):217-239.
    There are a number of different senses of the term “evil.” We examine in this paper the term “evil” when it is used to say things such as: “what Hitler did was not merely wrong, it was evil”, and “Hitler was not merely a bad person, he was an evil person”. Failing to keep a promise or telling a white lie may be morally wrong, but unlike genocide or sadistic torture, it is not evil in this sense. In this paper (...)
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  • The Nature of Evil.Eve Garrard - 1998 - Philosophical Explorations 1 (1):43 – 60.
    We readily claim that great moral catastrophes such as the Holocaust involve evil in some way, although it' not clear what this amounts to in a secular context. This paper seeks to provide a secular account of what evil is. It examines what is intuitively the most plausible account, namely that the evil act involves the production of great suffering (or other disvalue), and argues that such outcomes are neither necessary nor sufficient for an act to be evil. Only an (...)
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  • Defining Evil.Stephen de Wijze - 2002 - The Monist 85 (2):210-238.
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  • Evil as an Explanatory Concept.Eve Garrard - 2002 - The Monist 85 (2):320-336.
    On the day on which Dr Harold Shipman, the Manchester serial killer, was convicted, there was wall-to-wall coverage of it in the media. During the course of one of the many reports, the daughter of one of his victims was interviewed, and asked for her views on why Shipman had acted as he did. What she said was this: she’d tried and tried to understand or explain his deeds, and she could only come to the conclusion that he was a (...)
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  • Calibrating Evil.Hillel Steiner - 2002 - The Monist 85 (2):183-193.
    “This one,” she said, pointing at a chocolate in the box she was handing to me, “is absolutely evil.” And she was right or, at least, half-right: I’ve never tasted chocolate like that before, or since. Should I refrain from doing so?
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  • A Kantian Theory of Evil.Ernesto V. Garcia - 2002 - The Monist 85 (2):194-209.
    Is there any interesting sense in which we can speak of an act as ‘evil’, in contrast to simply “morally bad’ or “immoral”? In ordinary language, we typically judge actions as evil that somehow differ significantly, in terms of degree or intensity, from commonplace wrongdoing. That is, what we regard as evil are just those actions that, to some greater extent, more seriously offend our deeply-held moral sentiments or that produce much more harmful consequences. We feel that brutal acts of (...)
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  • Moral Monsters and Saints.Daniel M. Haybron - 2002 - The Monist 85 (2):260-284.
    This paper argues for the moral significance of the notion of an evil person or character. First, I argue that accounts of evil character ought to support a robust bad/evil distinction; yet existing theories cannot plausibly do so. Consequentialist and related theories also fail to account for some crucial properties of evil persons. Second, I sketch an intuitively plausible “affective-motivational” account of evil character. Third, I argue that the notion of evil character, thus conceived, denotes a significant moral category. It (...)
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  • Kant on the Limits of Human Evil.Paul Formosa - 2009 - Journal of Philosophical Research 34:189-214.
    Kant has often been accused of being far too “optimistic” when it comes to the extremes of evil that humans can perpetrate upon one another. In particular, Kant’s supposed claim that humans cannot choose evil qua evil has struck many people as simply false. Another problem for Kant, or perhaps the same problem in another guise, is his supposed claim that all evil is done for the sake of self-love. While self-love might be a plausible way to explain some instances (...)
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  • Evil and Human Nature.Roy W. Perrett - 2002 - The Monist 85 (2):304-19.
    One familiar philosophical use of the term ‘evil’ just contrasts it with ‘good’, i.e., something is an evil if it is a bad thing, one of life’s “minuses.” This is the sense of ‘evil’ that is used in posing the traditional theological problem of evil, though it is customary there to distinguish between moral evils and natural evils. Moral evils are those bad things that are caused by moral agents; natural evils are those bad things that are not caused by (...)
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  • Is Evil Action Qualitatively Distinct From Ordinary Wrongdoing?Luke Russell - 2007 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (4):659 – 677.
    Adam Morton, Stephen de Wijze, Hillel Steiner, and Eve Garrard have defended the view that evil action is qualitatively distinct from ordinary wrongdoing. By this, they do not that mean that evil actions feel different to ordinary wrongs, but that they have motives or effects that are not possessed to any degree by ordinary wrongs. Despite their professed intentions, Morton and de Wijze both offer accounts of evil action that fail to identify a clear qualitative difference between evil and ordinary (...)
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  • “Moral Address, Moral Responsibility, and the Boundaries of the Moral Community.David Shoemaker - 2007 - Ethics 118 (1):70-108.
    This paper attempts to provide a more plausible theory of moral accountability and the crucial role in it of moral address by taking seriously four "marginal" cases of agency: psychopaths, moral fetishists, and individuals with autism and mild intellectual disabilities. Each case motivates the addition of another key accountability capacity.
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  • Kant's Conception of the Highest Good, the Gesinnung, and the Theory of Radical Evil.Matthew Caswell - 2006 - Kant-Studien 97 (2):184-209.
    Early in the Preface to Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone, Kant claims that “morality leads ineluctably to religion”. This thesis is hardly an innovation of the Religion. Again and again throughout the critical corpus, Kant argues that religious belief is ethically significant, that it makes a morally meaningful difference whether an agent believes or disbelieves. And yet these claims are surely among the most doubted of Kant's positions – and they are often especially doubted by readers who consider (...)
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  • What is Kantian Gesinnung? On the Priority of Volition Over Metaphysics and Psychology in Religion Within the Bounds of Bare Reason.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2015 - Kantian Review 20 (2):235-264.
    Kants theories of both general moral decision-making and specifically religious conversion. It is argued that Kantian Gesinnung is volitional, referring to a personconvictionberzeugung (). This is confirmed by a detailed analysis of the 169 occurrences of Gesinnung and cognate words in Religion. It contrasts with what is suggested by translating Gesinnung as, which reinforces a tendency to interpret the notion more metaphysically, and also with Pluharattitude’, which has too strongly psychological connotations.
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  • 2. On "Freedom and Resentment".Galen Strawson - 1993 - In John Martin Fischer & Mark Ravizza (eds.), Perspectives on Moral Responsibility. Cornell University Press. pp. 67-100.
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  • Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil.Hannah Arendt - 1964 - Science and Society 28 (2):223-227.
     
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  • On the Very Idea of a Propensity to Evil.Henry E. Allison - 2002 - Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (2-3):337-348.
  • Kant on Radical Evil and the Origin of Moral Responsibility.Irene McMullin - 2013 - Kantian Review 18 (1):49-72.
    The notion of radical evil plays a more important role in Kant's moral theory than is typically recognized. In Religion Within the Limits of Mere Reason, radical evil is both an innate propensity and a morally imputable act – a paradoxical status that has prompted commentators to reject it as inconsistent with the rest of Kant's moral theory. In contrast, I argue that the notion of radical evil accounts for the beginning of moral responsibility in Kant's theory, since the act (...)
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  • Kant’s Conception of Moral Character: The ‘Critical’ Link of Morality, Anthropology, and Reflective Judgment. [REVIEW]G. Felicitas Munzel - 1999 - Ethics 112 (3):634-637.
    Currently fashionable among critics of enlightenment thought is the charge that Kant's ethics fails to provide an adequate account of character and its formation in moral and political life. G. Felicitas Munzel challenges this reading of Kant's thought, claiming not only that Kant has a very rich notion of moral character, but also that it is a conception of systematic importance for his thought, linking the formal moral with the critical, aesthetic, anthropological, and biological aspects of his philosophy. The first (...)
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  • Vessels of Evil: American Slavery and the Holocaust.Laurence Thomas - 1996 - Ethics 106 (2):424-448.
    Two profound atrocities in the history of Western culture form the subject of this moving philosophical exploration: American Slavery and the Holocaust. An African American and a Jew, Laurence Mordekhai Thomas denounces efforts to place the suffering of one group above the other. Rather, he pronounces these two defining historical experiences as profoundly evil in radically different ways and points to their logically incompatible aims. The author begins with a discussion of the nature of evil, exploring the fragility of human (...)
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  • The Concept of Evil.Marcus G. Singer - 2004 - Philosophy 79 (2):185-214.
    Though ‘evil’ is often used loosely as merely the generic opposite of ‘morally good’, used precisely it is the worst possible term of opprobrium available. In this essay it is taken as applying primarily to persons, secondarily to conduct; evil deeds must flow from the volition to do something evil. An evil action is one so horrendously bad that no ordinary decent human being can conceive of doing it, and an evil person is one who knowingly wills or orders such (...)
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  • Are Moral Requirements Hypothetical Imperatives?John McDowell & I. G. McFetridge - 1978 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 52 (1):13-42.
  • Facing Evil.John Kekes - 1991 - Philosophy 66 (258):536-538.
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  • Defining Evil.Stephen de Wijze - 2002 - The Monist 85 (2):210-238.
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  • Kant, Radical Evil, and Crimes Against Humanity.Sharon Anderson-Gold - 2010 - In Sharon Anderson-Gold & Pablo Muchnik (eds.), Kant's Anatomy of Evil. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  • Kant's Moral Excluded Middle.Claudia Card - 2010 - In Sharon Anderson-Gold & Pablo Muchnik (eds.), Kant's Anatomy of Evil. Cambridge University Press.
  • Evil, "Evil", and Taking Responsibility.Zachary J. Goldberg - 2016 - In Birgit Recki (ed.), Wozu ist das Böse gut? Mentis.
    This essay will address the question for what good or purpose is evil. First, an examination of the use-mention distinction between evil and “evil” produces two distinct questions: what good is the presence of evil in the world, and what good is the concept of evil as part of our ethical vocabulary describing human interaction. By severing all logically necessary connections between evil and greater goods, we discover that the answer to the first question—what good is evil in the world—is (...)
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