Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. The Victorian Conflict Between Science and Religion: A Professional Dimension.Frank Miller Turner - 1974 - Isis 69 (2):356-376.
  • The Origin of Species: By Means of Natural Selection of the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life.Charles Darwin - 1859 - Norton.
    In The Origin of Species (1859) Darwin challenged many of the most deeply-held beliefs of the Western world. Arguing for a material, not divine, origin of species, he showed that new species are achieved by "natural selection." The Origin communicates the enthusiasm of original thinking in an open, descriptive style, and Darwin's emphasis on the value of diversity speaks more strongly now than ever. As well as a stimulating introduction and detailed notes, this edition offers a register of the many (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   429 citations  
  • The Image of Newton and Locke in the Age of Reason.Gerd Buchdahl - 1961 - Sheed & Ward.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • A Discourse on the Studies of the University.Adam Sedgwick - 1834 - Printed at the Pitt Press by John Smith for J. & J. J. Deighton, Cambridge and John W. Parker, West Strand, London.
    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps, and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Atom and Individual in the Age of Newton: On the Genesis of the Mechanistic World View.Gideon Freudenthal - 1986 - Springer, Dordrecht.
    In this stimulating investigation, Gideon Freudenthal has linked social history with the history of science by formulating an interesting proposal: that the supposed influence of social theory may be seen as actual through its co herence with the process of formation of physical concepts. The reinterpre tation of the development of science in the seventeenth century, now widely influential, receives at Freudenthal's hand its most persuasive statement, most significantly because of his attention to the theoretical form which is charac teristic. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Hume, Newton, and the Design Argument.Robert H. Hurlbutt - 1965 - Lincoln, University of Nebraska Press.
  • The Argument From Design.Thomas McPherson - 1972 - [New York]St. Martin's Press.
    “NATURAL theology” is generally used as the name of a study which seeks to “get at religious truth” by the use of man's reasoning powers, and not to expound revelation. But I want to limit its application to part of this field. By natural theology I mean here a study which seeks to “get at religious truth” by an empirical examination of things, and not by “pure reason.” It is a “scientific” theology. An example of a natural theologian in this (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Victorian Church: 1829-1859.Owen Chadwick - 1966 - Oxford University Press.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence. Edited by H. G. Alexander New York: Philosophical Library, Inc., 1956. Pp. Lvi. 200. $4.75.Edward C. Moore - 1957 - Philosophy of Science 24 (4):367-369.
  • Natural History, Natural Theology, and Social Order: John Ray and the "Newtonian Ideology".Neal C. Gillespie - 1987 - Journal of the History of Biology 20 (1):1 - 49.
  • Hume, Newton, and the Design Argument.Robert H. Hurlbutt & Wallace I. Matson - 1965 - Philosophy 41 (156):181-183.
  • An Idol of the Market-Place: Baconianism in Nineteenth Century Britain.Richard Yeo - 1985 - History of Science 23 (3):251-298.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Newton's Philosophy of Nature; Selections From His Writings.E. W. Strong - 1955 - Journal of Philosophy 52 (8):214-219.
  • Attraction Universelle Et Religion Naturelle Chez Quelques Commentateurs Anglais de Newton. [REVIEW]S. P. L. - 1939 - Journal of Philosophy 36 (1):17-18.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Newton of the Grassblade? Darwin and the Problem of Organic Teleology.John Cornell - 1986 - Isis 77:404-421.
  • The Estrangement of Celestial Mechanics and Religion.Herbert H. Odom - 1966 - Journal of the History of Ideas 27 (4):533.
  • Lectures and Essays on Natural Theology and Ethics.E. B. McGilvary - 1900 - Philosophical Review 9 (2):188-193.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence.William P. D. Wightman - 1957 - Philosophical Quarterly 7 (28):286-287.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Voluntarism and Immanence: Conceptions of Nature in Eighteenth-Century Thought.P. M. Heimann - 1978 - Journal of the History of Ideas 39 (2):271.
  • Attraction universelle et religion naturelle chez quelques commentateurs anglais de Newton.[author unknown] - 1941 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 131 (9):476-477.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Nebular Contraction and the Expansion of Naturalism.J. H. Brooke - 1979 - British Journal for the History of Science 12 (2):200-211.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • History, Man, and Reason.M. MANDELBAUM - 1971
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Robert Chambers and the Nebular Hypothesis.Marilyn Bailey Ogilvie - 1975 - British Journal for the History of Science 8 (3):214-232.
    The role of Robert Chambers's anonymous Vestiges of the natural history of creation in popularizing evolutionary ideas establishes it as a significant work in the history of science even though its intrinsic scientific value is not great. Its fascinating subject, a universally applicable developmental hypothesis, piqued the curiosity of the nineteenth-century reading public. The clientele to whom the book especially appealed was not too concerned with errors in fact and unsupported generalizations, but instead was attracted by the smoothness of its (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • From Design to Dissolution: Thomas Chalmers' Debt to John Robison.Crosbie Smith - 1979 - British Journal for the History of Science 12 (1):59-70.
    The claim that the nineteenth century was a period of major transition for the relation between theology and natural science has become a historical truism. With its implications for the design argument and the doctrines of divine providence, Darwin's theory of evolution has rightly attracted the attention of scholars of Victorian science. Yet so much emphasis not only on Darwin himself, but on the life sciences generally, has tended to obscure some important issues concerning the relation of theology to natural (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Herschel in Bedlam: Natural History and Stellar Astronomy.Simon Schaffer - 1980 - British Journal for the History of Science 13 (3):211-239.
    In his comprehensive survey of the work of William Herschel, published in the Annuaire du Bureau des Longitudes for 1842, Dominique Arago argued that the life of the great astronomer ‘had the rare privilege of forming an epoch in an extended branch of astronomy’. Arago also noted, however, that Herschel's ideas were often taken as ‘the conceptions of a madman’, even if they were subsequently accepted. This fact, commented Arago, ‘seems to me one that deserves to appear in the history (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • The Eclipse of Darwinism: Anti-Darwinian Evolution Theories in the Decades Around 1900.Peter J. Bowler - 1984 - Journal of the History of Biology 17 (3):433-434.
  • God and Natural Selection: The Darwinian Idea of Design.Dov Ospovat - 1980 - Journal of the History of Biology 13 (2):169-194.
    If we arrange in chronological order the various statements Darwin made about God, creation, design, plan, law, and so forth, that I have discussed, there emerges a picture of a consistent development in Darwin's religious views from the orthodoxy of his youth to the agnosticism of his later years. Numerous sources attest that at the beginning of the Beagle voyage Darwin was more or less orthodox in religion and science alike.78 After he became a transmutationist early in 1837, he concluded (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Of Gods and Kings: Natural Philosophy and Politics in the Leibniz-Clarke Disputes.Steven Shapin - 1981 - Isis 72:187-215.
  • Natural Theology and the Plurality of Worlds: Observations on the Brewster-Whewell Debate.John Hedley Brooke - 1977 - Annals of Science 34 (3):221-286.
    Summary The object of this study is to analyse certain aspects of the debate between David Brewster and William Whewell concerning the probability of extra-terrestrial life, in order to illustrate the nature, constitution and condition of natural theology in the decades immediately preceding the publication in 1859 of Charles Darwin's Origin of species. The argument is directed against a stylised picture of natural theology which has been drawn from a backward projection of the Darwinian antithesis between natural selection and certain (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • Science in English Encyclopædias, 1704–1875.—I.Arthur Hughes - 1951 - Annals of Science 7 (4):340-370.
  • Natural History, Natural Theology, and Social Order: John Ray and The?Newtonian Ideology?Neal C. Gillespie - 1987 - Journal of the History of Biology 20 (1):1-49.
  • Archetypes and Ancestors: Palaeontology in Victorian London, 1850-1875.Adrian Desmond - 1984 - Journal of the History of Biology 17 (1):151-152.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • The Idols of the Theatre: The British Association and its Early Critics.A. D. Orange - 1975 - Annals of Science 32 (3):277-294.
    In its infancy the British Association for the Advancement of Science derived a good deal of its inspiration from the writings of Francis Bacon. But the pursuit of Baconian policies brought with it attendant dangers which critics from Charles Dickens to the Times were not slow to magnify. Although the situation was further complicated by the sensitiveness of institutional Christianity at the start of Victoria's reign, some of the hazards which the Association endured had to be accepted simply as consequences (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Science in Culture: The Early Victorian Period.Susan Faye Cannon - 1980 - Journal of the History of Biology 13 (1):121-140.
  • Matter and Freedom in the Thought of Samuel Clarke.John H. Gay - 1963 - Journal of the History of Ideas 24 (1):85.
  • A Discourse on the Studies of the University.G. H. Bantock & Adam Sedgwick - 1971 - British Journal of Educational Studies 19 (3):351.
  • The Normative Role of Science in Early Victorian Thought.Walter F. Cannon - 1964 - Journal of the History of Ideas 25 (4):487.
  • The Argument From Design.Thomas Mcpherson, Jonathan Barnes, T. R. Miles & Ninian Smart - 1975 - Mind 84 (335):472-474.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Post-Darwinian Controversies: A Study of the Protestant Struggle to Come to Terms with Darwin in Great Britain and America 1870-1900.James R. Moore - 1982 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 33 (2):220-223.
  • The Development of Darwin's Theory: Natural History, Natural Theology & Natural Selection 1838-1859.Dov Ospovat & Michael T. Ghiselin - 1996 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 18 (3):363.