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  1. Plato: Alcibiades.Nicholas Denyer (ed.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Alcibiades was widely read in antiquity as the very best introduction to Plato. Alcibiades in his youth associated with Socrates, and went on to a spectacularly disgraceful career in politics. When Socrates was executed for 'corrupting the young men', Alcibiades was cited as a prime example. This dialogue represents Socrates meeting the charming but intellectually lazy Alcibiades as he is about to enter adult life, and using all his wiles in an attempt to win him for philosophy. In spite (...)
     
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  • Plato on God as Nous.Stephen P. Menn - 1995 - Southern Illinois University.
    This book is the first sustained modern investigation of Plato’s theology. A central thesis of the book is that Plato _had _a theology—not just a mythology for the ideal city, not just the theory of forms or the theory of cosmic souls, but also, irreducible to any of these, an account of God as _Nous _, the source of rational order both to souls and the world of bodies. The understanding of God as Reason, and of the world as governed (...)
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  • Plato: Complete Works.J. Cooper (ed.) - 1997 - Hackett.
    Outstanding translations by leading contemporary scholars--many commissioned especially for this volume--are presented here in the first single edition to include the entire surviving corpus of works attributed to Plato in antiquity. In his introductory essay, John Cooper explains the presentation of these works, discusses questions concerning the chronology of their composition, comments on the dialogue form in which Plato wrote, and offers guidance on approaching the reading and study of Plato's works. Also included are concise introductions by Cooper and Hutchinson (...)
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  • Socrates' Daimonic Art: Love for Wisdom in Four Platonic Dialogues.Elizabeth S. Belfiore - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Despite increasing interest in the figure of Socrates and in love in ancient Greece, no recent monograph studies these topics in all four of Plato's dialogues on love and friendship. This book provides important new insights into these subjects by examining Plato's characterization of Socrates in Symposium, Phaedrus, Lysis and the often neglected Alcibiades I. It focuses on the specific ways in which the philosopher searches for wisdom together with his young interlocutors, using an art that is 'erotic', not in (...)
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  • Plato’s Charmides: Positive Elenchus in a 'Socratic' Dialogue.Thomas M. Tuozzo - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Part I. Approaching the Dialogue: 1. Methodological preliminaries; 2. Historical and cultural context; Part II. Appropaching the Argument: 3. The opening scene; 4. Dialectic in the Charmides; Part III. The Dialectical Investigation: 5. Sophrosyne and its value; 6. Sophrosyne as self-knowledge: two reformulations; 7. Possibility of self-knowledge: Critian formulation; 8. Possibilitiy of self-knowledge; Socratic formulation; 9. Return of the value question; 10. Socrates' final speech and closing scene; 11. Sophrosyne, knowledge, and the good.
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  • The Structured Self in Hellenistic and Roman Thought.Christopher Gill - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Christopher Gill offers a new analysis of what is innovative in Hellenistic--especially Stoic and Epicurean--philosophical thinking about selfhood and personality. His wide-ranging discussion of Stoic and Epicurean ideas is illustrated by a more detailed examination of the Stoic theory of the passions and a new account of the history of this theory. His study also tackles issues about the historical study of selfhood and the relationship between philosophy and literature, especially the presentation of the collapse of character in Plutrarch's Lives, (...)
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  • God as the True Self.David M. Johnson - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (1):1-19.
  • God as the True Self: Plato’s Alcibiades I.David M. Johnson - 1999 - Ancient Philosophy 19 (1):1-19.
  • The Self-Seeing Soul in the Alcibiades I.Daniel Werner - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (2):307-331.
    The Alcibiades I concludes with an arresting image of an eye that sees itself by looking into another eye. Using the dialogue as a whole, I offer a detailed interpretation of this image and I discuss its implications for the question of self-knowledge. The Alcibiades I reveals both what self-knowledge is (knowledge of soul in its particularity and its universality) and how we are to seek it (by way of philosophical dialogue). This makes the pursuit of self-knowledge an inescapably social (...)
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  • The Structured Self in Hellenistic and Roman Thought.Brad Inwood - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (228):479-483.
  • A Note on Socratic Self-Knowledge in the Charmides.Hugh H. Benson - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):31-47.
  • Plato's Charmides and the Proleptic Reading of Socratic Dialogues.Charles H. Kahn - 1988 - Journal of Philosophy 85 (10):541-549.
  • Plato: Complete Works.J. Cooper & D. S. Hutchinson - 1998 - Phronesis 43 (2):197-206.
     
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  • Authenticity of Alcibiades I: Some Reflections. Jirsa - 2009 - Listy filologicke 132 (3-4):225-244.
    This text maps the history of debate on the authenticity of Plato's or pseudo-Plato's Alcibiades I.
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  • Reason to Care: The Object and Structure of Self-Knowledge in the Alcibiades I.Pauliina Remes - 2013 - Apeiron 46 (3):270-301.
  • Socrates and Self-Knowledge.Sara L. Rappe - 1995 - Apeiron 28 (1):1 - 24.
    Rappe, Sara L. “Socrates and Self- knowledge” .
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  • Where Did the Mirror Go? The Text of Plato [?] Alcibiades I 133c1-6.Harold Tarrant - 2015 - Elenchos 36 (2):361-372.
    At Alcibiades I, 133b-c, the reader expects, but does not according to the MSS find, the return of the mirror-motif that had supposedly explained the true meaning of the Delphic injunction. Hence it remains unclear why anything viewed within the soul should act in any way that resembles a mirror. I argue that the substitution of a single letter in one word, about which the manuscripts and modern scholars in any case disagree, can restore the necessary reference to a reflective (...)
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  • Dialectic and Who We Are in the Alcibiades.Albert Joosse - 2014 - Phronesis 59 (1):1-21.
    In the Platonic Alcibiades, Socrates raises two central philosophical questions: Who are we? and: How ought we to take care of ourselves? He answers these questions, I argue, in his famous comparison between eyes and souls. Both answers hinge upon dialectic: self-care functions through dialectic because we are communicating beings. I adduce arguments for this from the set-up and language of the comparison passage. Another important indication is that Socrates expressly refers back to an earlier, aborted attempt to describe who (...)
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  • Socrates’ Elenctic Mission.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 1991 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 9:131-159.
     
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  • Plato's Theism.R. Hackforth - 1936 - Classical Quarterly 30 (01):4-.
    In the ontology of the Philebus νοσ is the ατία τς συμμξεωσ, the cause that combines πρας with πειρον into the mixture called γνεσισ ες οσαν or γεγενημνη οσα: correspondingly in the Timaeus the Demiurge, ριστος τν ατιν , brings order into unordered chaos by ‘Forms and Numbers’ . In the Philebus the Universe has a Soul, discriminated from the νος that causes it : correspondingly in the Timaeus the Demiurge devises a soul of the world, as well as its (...)
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  • Plato's Theism.R. Hackforth - 1936 - Classical Quarterly 30 (1):4-9.
    In the ontology of the Philebus νοσ is the ατία τς συμμξεωσ, the cause that combines πρας with πειρον into the mixture called γνεσισ ες οσαν or γεγενημνη οσα: correspondingly in the Timaeus the Demiurge, ριστος τν ατιν, brings order into unordered chaos by ‘Forms and Numbers’. In the Philebus the Universe has a Soul, discriminated from the νος that causes it : correspondingly in the Timaeus the Demiurge devises a soul of the world, as well as its body.
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  • "Self-Knowledge in Early Plato".Julia Annas - 1985 - In Dominic J. O'Meara (ed.), Platonic Investigations. CUA Press. pp. 111-138.