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  1. A Treatise of Human Nature.David Hume & A. D. Lindsay - 1958 - Philosophical Quarterly 8 (33):379-380.
  • An Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals.David Hume & Tom L. Beauchamp - 1998 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 190 (2):230-231.
  • Locke on Testimony.Mark Boespflug - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (6):1135-1150.
    ABSTRACTThere is good reason to regard John Locke’s treatment of testimony as perhaps the most important of the early modern period. It is sophisticated, well developed, pioneering, and seems to ha...
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  • Hume at La Flèche: Skepticism and the French Connection.Dario Perinetti - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):45-74.
    In "My Own Life," Hume writes:1 During my retreat in France, first at Reims, but chiefly at La Fleche, in Anjou, I composed my Treatise of Human Nature. After passing three years very agreeably in that country, I came over to London in 1737. In the end of 1738, I published my Treatise, and immediately went down to my mother and my brother, who lived at his country house, and was employing himself very judiciously and successfully in the improvement of (...)
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  • Secularization: The Birth of a Modern Combat Concept.Ian Hunter - 2014 - Modern Intellectual History 12 (1):1-32.
    This paper argues that today’s dominant understanding of secularization — as an epochal transition from a society based on religious belief to one based on autonomous human reason — first appeared in philosophical histories at the beginning of the nineteenth century and was then anachronistically applied to early modern Europe. Apart from the earlier and persisting canon-law use of the term to refer to a species of exclaustration, prior to 1800 the standard lexicographical meaning of secularization was determined by its (...)
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  • Egyptology, the Limits of Antiquarianism, and the Origins of Conjectural History, C. 1680–1740: New Sources and Perspectives. [REVIEW]Dmitri Levitin - 2015 - History of European Ideas 41 (6):699-727.
    SummaryThis article introduces some previously unknown Egyptological discussions written in Britain between 1680 and 1740. They are significant in their own right: the last of them, a manuscript ‘Essay towards illustrating the History, Chronology, and Mythology of the Ancient Egyptians’ by the Aberdonian antiquary Alexander Gordon, has a claim to being the most important European Egyptological tract of the period, even if its contents are currently entirely unknown to scholarship. But it will also be argued that the treatises permit some (...)
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  • Hume's Reading of the Classics at Ninewells, 1749–51.Moritz Baumstark - 2010 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):63-77.
    This article provides a re-evaluation of David Hume's intensive reading of the classics at an important moment of his literary and intellectual career. It sets out to reconstruct the extent and depth of this reading as well as the uses – scholarly, philosophical and polemical – to which Hume put the information he had gathered in the course of it. The article contends that Hume read the classics against the grain to collect data on a wide range of cultural information (...)
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  • Historiography and Enlightenment: A View of Their History: J. G. A. Pocock.J. G. A. Pocock - 2008 - Modern Intellectual History 5 (1):83-96.
    This essay is written on the following premises and argues for them. “Enlightenment” is a word or signifier, and not a single or unifiable phenomenon which it consistently signifies. There is no single or unifiable phenomenon describable as “the Enlightenment,” but it is the definite article rather than the noun which is to be avoided. In studying the intellectual history of the late seventeenth century and the eighteenth, we encounter a variety of statements made, and assumptions proposed, to which the (...)
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  • Introduction: The Uses of Historical Evidence in Early Modern Europe.Jacob Soll - 2003 - Journal of the History of Ideas 64 (2):149-157.
  • Joseph Scaliger and Historical Chronology: The Rise and Fall of a Discipline.Anthony T. Grafton - 1975 - History and Theory 14 (2):156-185.
    Scaliger brought critical standards and methodological innovations to the already extensive sixteenth-century interest in chronology. He invented the Julian Period, a device for the reckoning of dates, exposed historical forgeries, and showed the independent value of non-Biblical sources even acknowledging Egyptian dynastic chronology antedating the Biblical Creation, although he could not satisfactorily resolve this conflict. After Scaliger, the quality of chronological studies declined as questions were argued less on historical grounds than on theological ones, but the confusion this created eventually (...)
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  • Reconsiderations on History and Antiquarianism: Arnaldo Momigliano and the Historiography of Eighteenth-Century Britain.Mark Salber Phillips - 1996 - Journal of the History of Ideas 57 (2):297-316.
  • Ancient History and the Antiquarian.Arnaldo Momigliano - 1950 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 13 (3/4):285-315.
  • A Bibliography for Hume's History of England: A Preliminary View.Roger I. Emerson & Mark G. Spencer - 2014 - Hume Studies 40 (1):53-71.
    Hume’s History of England has received a good deal of attention over the years, but no one has ever systematically studied his sources.1 Instead, scholars have worried about Hume’s biases, his portraits of figures like Charles I, and his alleged scorn for mere antiquarianism, which resulted in a readable but superficial history. The most exciting monograph dealing with his History of England in recent years sees it as a step in the process which led to nineteenth-century historicism. Others have seen (...)
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  • La méthode critique chez Pierre Bayle et l'Histoire.Elisabeth Labrousse - 1957 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 11 (4):450.
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  • Medievalism and the Ideologies of the Enlightenment: The World and Work of Lacurne de Sainte-Palaye.Lionel Gossman - 1971 - Diderot Studies 14:365-370.
     
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  • Hume's ''Of Miracles'': Probability and Irreligion'.David Wootton - 1990 - In M. A. Stewart (ed.), Studies in the Philosophy of the Scottish Enlightenment. Oxford University Press. pp. 191--229.