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  1. Theory and Reality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science.Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2003 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    How does science work? Does it tell us what the world is "really" like? What makes it different from other ways of understanding the universe? In Theory and Reality , Peter Godfrey-Smith addresses these questions by taking the reader on a grand tour of one hundred years of debate about science. The result is a completely accessible introduction to the main themes of the philosophy of science. Intended for undergraduates and general readers with no prior background in philosophy, Theory and (...)
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  • The Idea of Moral Progress.Michele M. Moody‐Adams - 1999 - Metaphilosophy 30 (3):168-185.
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  • Positivity and the Capabilities Approach.Eranda Jayawickreme & James O. Pawelski - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):383-400.
    We evaluate the suitability of Nussbaum's substantive account of capabilities in light of conceptual and empirical work that has shown that positivity is widely valued and pursued as an end by many people, and evidence that positive outcomes, even economic ones, are often caused by well-being rather than the other way around. While Nussbaum sees positive emotions as incidental to the experience of well-being, we argue that the experience of such mental states is partly constitutive of flourishing.
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  • Taking the Satisfaction (and the Life) Out of Life Satisfaction.Daniel M. Haybron - 2011 - Philosophical Explorations 14 (3):249-262.
    The science of well-being studies an evaluative kind, well-being, which raises natural worries about the ability of empirical research to deliver. This paper argues that well-being research can provide important information about how people are doing without entangling itself very deeply in controversial normative claims. Most life satisfaction research, for instance, purports only to tell us how people see their lives going relative to what they care about ? something most people can agree is important, whatever their theory of well-being. (...)
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  • Do We Know How Happy We Are? On Some Limits of Affective Introspection and Recall.Daniel M. Haybron - 2007 - Noûs 41 (3):394–428.
    This paper aims to show that widespread, serious errors in the self-assessment of affect are a genuine possibility-one worth taking very seriously. For we are subject to a variety of errors concerning the character of our present and past affective states, or "affective ignorance." For example, some affects, particularly moods, can greatly affect the quality of our experience even when we are unable to discern them. I note several implications of these arguments. First, we may be less competent pursuers of (...)
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  • Is Well-Being Measurable After All?Anna Alexandrova - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (2).
    In Valuing Health, Dan Hausman argues that well-being is not measurable, at least not in the way that science and policy would require. His argument depends on a demanding conception of well-being and on a pessimistic verdict upon the existing measures of subjective well-being. Neither of these reasons, I argue, warrant as much skepticism as Hausman professes.
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  • Welfare, Happiness, and Ethics.L. W. Sumner - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    Moral philosophers agree that welfare matters. But they disagree about what it is, or how much it matters. In this vital new work, Wayne Sumner presents an original theory of welfare, investigating its nature and discussing its importance. He considers and rejects all notable theories of welfare, both objective and subjective, including hedonism and theories founded on desire or preference. His own theory connects welfare closely with happiness or life satisfaction. Reacting against the value pluralism that currently dominates moral philosophy, (...)
  • Well-Being: The Foundations of Hedonic Psychology.Daniel Kahneman, Edward Diener & Norbert Schwarz (eds.) - 1999 - Russell Sage Foundation.
    The nature of well-being is one of the most enduring and elusive subjects of human inquiry. Well-Being draws upon the latest scientific research to transform our understanding of this ancient question. With contributions from leading authorities in psychology, social psychology, and neuroscience, this volume presents the definitive account of current scientific efforts to understand human pleasure and pain, contentment and despair. The distinguished contributors to this volume combine a rigorous analysis of human sensations, emotions, and moods with a broad assessment (...)
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  • International Differences in Well Being.Ed Diener, Daniel Kahneman & John Helliwell - 2010 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This book draws together the latest work from scholars around the world using subjective well-being data to understand and compare well-being across countries and cultures. Starting from many different vantage points, the authors reached a consensus that many measures of subjective well-being, ranging from life evaluations through emotional states, based on memories and current evaluations, merit broader collection and analysis. Using data from the Gallup World Poll, the World Values Survey, and other internationally comparable surveys, the authors document wide divergences (...)
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  • Unnecessary Evil: History and Moral Progress in the Philosophy of Immanuel Kant.Sharon Anderson-Gold - 2000 - State University of New York Press.
    Demonstrates the systematic connection between Kant's ethics and his philosophy of history.
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  • Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience.Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi - 1990 - Harper & Row.
  • Psychology and Consumer Culture: The Struggle for a Good Life in a Materialistic World.Tim Kasser & Allen D. Kanner (eds.) - 2004 - American Psychological Association.
    This book provides an in-depth analysis of consumerism that draws from a wide range of theoretical, clinical and methodological approaches. Contributors demonstrate that consumerism and the culture that surrounds it exert profound and often undesirable effects on both people's individual lives and on society as a whole. Far from being distant influences, advertising, consumption, materialism and the capitalistic economic system affect personal, social and ecological well-being on many levels. Contributors also provide a variety of potential interventions for counteracting the negative (...)
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  • The Proliferation of Rights: Moral Progress or Empty Rhetoric?Carl Wellman - 1999 - Westview Press.
    The Proliferation of Rights explores how the assertion of rights has expanded dramatically since World War II. Carl Wellman illuminates for the reader the historical developments in each of the major categories of rights, including human rights, civil rights, women’s rights, patient rights, and animal rights. He concludes by assessing where this proliferation has been legitimate and helpful, cases where it has been illusory and unproductive, and alternatives to the appeal to rights.
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  • The Expanding Circle: Ethics and Sociobiology.Peter Singer - 1981 - Oxford University Press.
  • Reports of Subjective Well-Being: Judgmental Processes and Their Methodological Implications.Norbert Schwarz & Fritz Strack - 1999 - In Daniel Kahneman, Ed Diener & Norbert Schwarz (eds.), Well-Being: The Foundations of Hedonic Psychology. New York: pp. 61-84.
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  • Civilization and its Discontents.Sigmund Freud - 1952/1930 - In John Martin Rich (ed.), Readings in the Philosophy of Education. Belmont, Calif., Wadsworth Pub. Co..
     
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  • Theory and Reality. An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science.Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2005 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 67 (2):393-394.
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  • The Expanding Circle. Ethics and Sociobiology.Peter Singer - 1983 - Erkenntnis 20 (3):377-381.
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  • Do We Know How Happy We Are?Dan Haybron - manuscript
    This paper aims to show that widespread, serious errors in the self-assessment of affect are a genuine possibility—one worth taking very seriously. For we are subject to a variety of errors concerning the character of our present and past affective states, or “affective ignorance.” For example, some affects, particularly moods, can greatly affect the quality of our experience even when we are unable to discern them. I note several implications of these arguments. First, we may be less competent pursuers of (...)
     
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