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  1. Review of Thomas S. Kuhn The Essential Tension: Selected Studies in Scientific Tradition and Change. [REVIEW]David Zaret - 1981 - Philosophical Review 90 (1):146.
  • Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future.Friedrich Nietzsche - 1907 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Nietzsche's mature masterpiece, Beyond Good and Evil considers the origins and nature of Judeo-Christian morality; the end of philosophical dogmatism and beginning of perspectivism; the questionable virtues of science and scholarship; liberal democracy, nationalism, and women's emancipation. A superb and new translation by Marion Faber, this highly annotated edition is complemented by a lucid introduction by one of the most eminent of Nietzsche scholars, Robert C. Holub.
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  • Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future.Friedrich Nietzsche (ed.) - 1907 - Penguin Books.
    Beyond Good and Evil is one of the most scathing and powerful critiques of philosophy, religion, science, politics and ethics ever written. In it, Nietzsche presents a set of problems, criticisms and philosophical challenges that continue both to inspire and to trouble contemporary thought. In addition, he offers his most subtle, detailed and sophisticated account of the virtues, ideas, and practices which will characterize philosophy and philosophers of the future. With his relentlessly energetic style and tirelessly probing manner, Nietzsche embodies (...)
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  • Companion to the History of Modern Science.R. C. Olby, G. N. Cantor, J. R. R. Christie & M. J. S. Hodge (eds.) - 1989 - Routledge.
    This invaluable resource is the first one-volume, in-depth, comprehensive history of modern science ever published.
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  • How to Do Theory.Wolfgang Iser - 2005 - Blackwell.
    This succinct introduction to modern theories of literature and the arts demonstrates how each theory is built and what it can accomplish. Represents a wide variety of theories, including phenomenological theory, hermeneutical theory, gestalt theory, reception theory, semiotic theory, Marxist theory, deconstruction, anthropological theory, and feminist theory. Uses classic literary texts, such as Keats’s Ode on a Grecian Urn, Spenser’s The Shephearde’s Calender and T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land to illustrate his explanations. Includes key statements by the major proponents (...)
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  • Language, Counter-Memory, Practice: Selected Essays and Interviews. Transl. From the French by Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon.Michel Foucault - 1977 - Cornell University Press.
    Language and the birth of "literature." A preface to transgression. Language to infinity. The father's "no." Fantasia of the library.--Counter-memory: the philosophy of difference. What is an author? Nietzsche, genealogy, history. Theatrum philosophicum.--Practice: knowledge and power. History of systems of thought. Intellectuals and power. Revolutionary action: "until now.".
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  • Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact.Ludwik Fleck - 1979 - University of Chicago Press.
    The sociological dimension of science is studied using the discovery of the Wasserman reaction and its accidental application as a test for syphilis as a basis, ...
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  • Moving Heaven and Earth. Copernicus and the Solar System.John Henry & Andrew Gregory - 2003 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 65 (4):768-769.
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  • Towards an Historiography of Science.Joseph Agassi - 1967 - Wesleyan University Press, 1967.
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  • A Brief History of Time From the Big Bang to Black Holes.Stephen W. Hawking - 1988 - Bantam.
    A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes is a popular-science book on cosmology by British physicist Stephen Hawking. It was first published in 1988. Hawking wrote the book for readers who have no prior knowledge of the universe and people who are interested in learning.
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  • Image and Logic: A Material Culture of Microphysics.Peter Galison (ed.) - 1997 - University of Chicago Press: Chicago.
    Engages with the impact of modern technology on experimental physicists. This study reveals how the increasing scale and complexity of apparatus has distanced physicists from the very science which drew them into experimenting, and has fragmented microphysics into different technical traditions.
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  • The Civilizing Process: Sociogenetic and Psychogenetic Investigations.Norbert Elias - 1939/1969 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    The Civilizing Process stands out as Norbert Elias' greatest work, tracing the "civilizing" of manners and personality in Western Europe since the late Middle Ages by demonstrating how the formation of states and the monopolization of power within them changed Western society forever.
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  • The Ascent of Science.Brian L. Silver - 1998 - Oxford University Press, Usa.
    A history of Western science from the Renaissance to the present explains scientific theories and discoveries in plain language and explores the nature of scientific reasoning and its place in society.
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  • The Scientific Revolution and the Origins of Modern Science.John Henry - 1997 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Acknowledgements viii Acknowledgements for the Second Edition ix 1 The Scientific Revolution and the Historiography of Science 1 2 Renaissance and Revolution 9 3 The Scientific Method 14 The Mathematization of the World Picture 14 Experience and Experiment 30 4 Magic and the Origins of Modern Science 54 5 The Mechanical Philosophy 68 6 Religion and Science 85 7 Science and the Wider Culture 98 8 Conclusion 110 Bibliography 113 Glossary 139 Index 153.
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  • The Pleasure of the Text.Roland Barthes - 1975 - Noonday Press.
    What is it that we do when we enjoy a text? What is the pleasure of reading? The French critic and theorist Roland Barthes's answers to these questions constitute "perhaps for the first time in the history of criticism . . . not only a poetics of reading . . . but a much more difficult achievement, an erotics of reading . . . . Like filings which gather to form a figure in a magnetic field, the parts and pieces (...)
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  • Hyperprofessionalism and the Crisis of Readership in the History of Science.Steven Shapin - 2005 - Isis 96:238-243.
    There is a crisis of readership for work in our field, as in many other academic disciplines. One of its causes is a pathological form of the professionalism that we so greatly value. “Hyperprofessionalism” is a disease whose symptoms include self‐referentiality, self‐absorption, and a narrowing of intellectual focus. This essay describes some features and consequences of hyperprofessionalism in the history of science and offers a modest suggestion for a possible cure.
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  • Companion to the History of Modern Science.R. C. Olby, G. N. Cantor, J. R. R. Christie & M. J. S. Hodge - 1989 - Journal of the History of Biology 24 (2):345-347.
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  • The Essential Tension. Selected Studies in Scientific Tradition and Change.Ian Hacking & Thomas S. Kuhn - 1977 - History and Theory 18 (2):223.
  • Technics and Civilization. [REVIEW]H. A. L. - 1934 - Journal of Philosophy 31 (12):331-332.
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  • Towards an Historiography of Science.Nicholas Rescher - 1965 - Philosophical Review 74 (1):115-117.
    Bacon's inductivist philosophy of science divides thinkers into the scientific and the prejudiced, using as a standard the up-to-date science textbook. Inductivists regard the history of science as progressing smoothly, from facts rather than from problems, to increasingly general theories, undisturbed by contending scientific schools. Conventionalists regard theories as pigeonholes for classifying facts; history of science is the development of increasingly simple theories, neither true nor false. Conventionalism is useless for reconstructing and weighing conflicts between schools, and overemphasizes science's internal (...)
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  • Truth and Method.H. G. Gadamer - 1975 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 36 (4):487-490.
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  • Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future.Grace Neal Dolson - 1908 - Philosophical Review 17 (5):557.
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  • Towards an Historiography of Science.[author unknown] - 1963 - History and Theory 2 (2):1-117.
    Bacon's inductivist philosophy of science divides thinkers into the scientific and the prejudiced, using as a standard the up-to-date science textbook. Inductivists regard the history of science as progressing smoothly, from facts rather than from problems, to increasingly general theories, undisturbed by contending scientific schools. Conventionalists regard theories as pigeonholes for classifying facts; history of science is the development of increasingly simple theories, neither true nor false. Conventionalism is useless for reconstructing and weighing conflicts between schools, and overemphasizes science's internal (...)
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  • Is There a Text in This Class? The Authority of Interpretive Communities.Edward Proffitt & Stanley Fish - 1983 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 17 (2):123.
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  • Hyperprofessionalism and the Crisis of Readership in the History of Science.Steven Shapin - 2005 - Isis 96 (2):238-243.
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