Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Luck Egalitarianism: Equality, Responsibility, and Justice.Carl Knight - 2009 - Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
    How should we decide which inequalities between people are justified, and which are unjustified? One answer is that such inequalities are only justified where there is a corresponding variation in responsible action or choice on the part of the persons concerned. This view, which has become known as 'luck egalitarianism', has come to occupy a central place in recent debates about distributive justice. This book is the first full length treatment of this significant development in contemporary political philosophy. Each of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  • Animal Liberation.Peter Singer (ed.) - 1977 - Avon Books.
    Since its original publication in 1975, this groundbreaking work has awakened millions of concerned men and women to the shocking abuse of animals everywhere--inspiring a worldwide movement to eliminate much of the cruel and unnecessary laboratory animal experimentation of years past. In this newly revised and expanded edition, author Peter Singer exposes the chilling realities of today's "factory farms" and product-testing procedures--offering sound, humane solutions to what has become a profound environmental and social as well as moral issue. An important (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   563 citations  
  • Distributing Responsibilities.David Miller - 2001 - Journal of Political Philosophy 9 (4):453–471.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   117 citations  
  • In Nature’s Interests: Interests, Animal Rights, and Environmental Ethics.Gary Edward Varner - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    This book offers a powerful response to what Varner calls the "two dogmas of environmental ethics"--the assumptions that animal rights philosophies and anthropocentric views are each antithetical to sound environmental policy. Allowing that every living organism has interests which ought, other things being equal, to be protected, Varner contends that some interests take priority over others. He defends both a sentientist principle giving priority to the lives of organisms with conscious desires and an anthropocentric principle giving priority to certain very (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   66 citations  
  • Human Morality.Samuel Scheffler - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    Some people believe that the demands of morality coincide with the requirements of an enlightened self-interest. Others believe that morality is diametrically opposed to considerations of self-interest. This book argues that there is another position, intermediate between these extremes, which makes better sense of the totality of our moral thought and practice. Scheffler elaborates this position via an examination of morality's content, scope, authority, and deliberative role. Although conflicts between morality and self-interest do arise, according to this position, nevertheless morality (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   59 citations  
  • What We Owe to Each Other.Thomas Scanlon - 1998 - Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.
    In this book, T. M. Scanlon offers new answers to these questions, as they apply to the central part of morality that concerns what we owe to each other.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2151 citations  
  • Science and Ethics.Bernard E. Rollin - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    In Science and Ethics, Bernard Rollin examines the ideology that denies the relevance of ethics to science. Providing an introduction to basic ethical concepts, he discusses a variety of ethical issues that are relevant to science and how they are ignored, to the detriment of both science and society. These include research on human subjects, animal research, genetic engineering, biotechnology, cloning, xenotransplantation, and stem cell research. Rollin also explores the ideological agnosticism that scientists have displayed regarding subjective experience in humans (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  • A Rational Approach to Animal Rights: Extensions in Abolitionist Theory.Corey Wrenn - 2014 - Palgrave.
    Applying critical sociological theory, this book explores the shortcomings of popular tactics in animal liberation efforts. Building a case for a scientifically-grounded grassroots approach, it is argued that professionalized advocacy that works in the service of theistic, capitalist, patriarchal institutions will find difficulty achieving success.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Case for Animal Rights.Tom Regan - 1983 - University of California Press, C1983.
    More than twenty years after its original publication, _The Case for Animal Rights _is an acknowledged classic of moral philosophy, and its author is recognized as the intellectual leader of the animal rights movement. In a new and fully considered preface, Regan responds to his critics and defends the book's revolutionary position.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   399 citations  
  • Animals Like Us.Mark Rowlands - 2002 - Verso.
  • Empty Cages: Facing the Challenge of Animal Rights.Tom Regan & Jeffery Moussaieff Masson - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Described by Jeffrey Masson as 'the single best introduction to animal rights ever written,' this new book by Tom Regan dispels the negative image of animal rights advocates perpetrated by the mass media, unmasks the fraudulent rhetoric of 'humane treatment' favored by animal exploiters, and explains why existing laws function to legitimize institutional cruelty.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • The Ethics of Confining Animals: From Farms to Zoos to Human Homes.David DeGrazia - 2011 - In Tom Beauchamp & R. G. Frey (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Animal Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This article examines basic interests that animals have in liberty—the absence of external constraints on movement. It takes liberty to be a benefit for sentient animals that permits them to pursue what they want and need. Obviously farms, zoos, pets in homes, animals for sale in stores, circuses, and laboratories all involve forms of confinement that restrict liberty. The discussion aims to know the conditions, if there are any, under which such liberty-limitation is morally justified. It first lays out the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Animals and the Moral Community: Mental Life, Moral Status, and Kinship.Gary Steiner - 2008 - Columbia University Press.
    Gary Steiner argues that ethologists and philosophers in the analytic and continental traditions have largely failed to advance an adequate explanation of animal behavior.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Respect for Nature: A Theory of Environmental Ethics.Paul W. Taylor - 1986
    What rational justification is there for conceiving of all living things as possessing inherent worth? In Respect for Nature, Paul Taylor draws on biology, moral philosophy, and environmental science to defend a biocentric environmental ethic in which all life has value. Without making claims for the moral rights of plants and animals, he offers a reasoned alternative to the prevailing anthropocentric view--that the natural environment and its wildlife are valued only as objects for human use or enjoyment. Respect for Nature (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   217 citations  
  • Animal Rights, Human Wrongs: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy.Tom Regan - 2003 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Regan provides the theoretical framework that grounds a responsible pro-animal rights perspective, and ultimately explores how asking moral questions about other animals can lead to a better understanding of ourselves.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Robbing PETA to Spay Paul: Do Animal Rights Include Reproductive Rights?David Boonin - 2003 - Between the Species 13 (3):1.
  • Comparing Harms: Headaches and Human Lives.Alastair Norcross - 1997 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 26 (2):135-167.
  • Benefiting From the Wrongdoing of Others.Robert E. Goodin & Christian Barry - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):363-376.
    Bracket out the wrong of committing a wrong, or conspiring or colluding or conniving with others in their committing one. Suppose you have done none of those things, and you find yourself merely benefiting from a wrong committed wholly by someone else. What, if anything, is wrong with that? What, if any, duties follow from it? If straightforward restitution were possible — if you could just ‘give back’ what you received as a result of the wrongdoing to its rightful owner (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • The Ethics of Producing In Vitro Meat.G. Owen Schaefer & Julian Savulescu - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):188-202.
    The prospect of consumable meat produced in a laboratory setting without the need to raise and slaughter animals is both realistic and exciting. Not only could such in vitro meat become popular due to potential cost savings, but it also avoids many of the ethical and environmental problems with traditional meat productions. However, as with any new technology, in vitro meat is likely to face some detractors. We examine in detail three potential objections: 1) in vitro meat is disrespectful, either (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • What’s Love Got to Do with It? An Ecofeminist Approach to Inter-Animal and Intra-Cultural Conflicts of Interest.Karen S. Emmerman - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (1):77-91.
    Many familial and cultural traditions rely on animals for their fulfillment - think of Christmas ham, Rosh Hashannah chicken soup, Fourth of July barbeques, and so forth. Though philosophers writing in animal ethics often dismiss interests in certain foods as trivial, these food-based traditions pose a significant moral problem for those who take animals’ lives and interests seriously. One must either turn one’s back on one’s community or on the animals. In this paper, I consider the under-theorized area of intra-cultural (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Vegetarianism.Stuart Rachels - unknown
    1. Animal Cruelty Industrial farming is appallingly abusive to animals. Pigs. In America, nine-tenths of pregnant sows live in “gestation crates. ” These pens are so small that the animals can barely move. When the sows are first crated, they may flail around, in an attempt to get out. But soon they give up. Crated pigs often show signs of depression: they engage meaningless, repetitive behavior, like chewing the air or biting the bars of the stall. The sows live like (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • On Benefiting From Injustice.Daniel Butt - 2007 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (1):129-152.
    How do we acquire moral obligations to others? The most straightforward cases are those where we acquire obligations as the result of particular actions which we voluntarily perform. If I promise you that I will trim your hedge, I face a moral Obligation to uphold my promise, and in the absence of some morally significant countervailing reason, I should indeed cut your hedge. Moral obligations which arise as a result of wrongdoing, as a function of corrective justice, are typically thought (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   57 citations  
  • Dignitarian Hunting.Dan Demetriou & Bob Fischer - 2018 - Social Theory and Practice 44 (1):49-73.
    Faced with the choice between supporting industrial plant agriculture and hunting, Tom Regan’s rights view can be plausibly developed in a way that permits a form of hunting we call “dignitarian.” To motivate this claim, we begin by showing how the empirical literature on animal deaths in plant agriculture suggests that a non-trivial amount of hunting would not add to animal harm. We discuss how Tom Regan’s miniride principle appears to morally permit hunting in that case, and we address recent (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Contractualism and Aggregation.Alastair Norcross - 2002 - Social Theory and Practice 28 (2):303-314.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • On Being Morally Considerable.Kenneth E. Goodpaster - 1978 - Journal of Philosophy 75 (6):308-325.
  • Equality and Equal Opportunity for Welfare.Richard J. Arneson - 1989 - Philosophical Studies 56 (1):77 - 93.
  • Equality and Equal Opportunity for Welfare.Richard Arneson - 1997 - In Louis P. Pojman & Robert Westmoreland (eds.), Equality: Selected Readings. Oup Usa.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   180 citations  
  • Suffering and Moral Responsibility.Jamie Mayerfeld - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (205):558-560.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • Persons, Character, and Morality.Bernard Williams - 1976 - In James Rachels (ed.), Moral Luck: Philosophical Papers 1973–1980. Cambridge University Press.
  • Xenotransplantation, Subsistence Hunting and the Pursuit of Health: Lessons for Animal Rights-Based Vegan Advocacy.Nathan Nobis - 2018 - Between the Species 21 (1).
    I argue that, contrary to what Tom Regan suggests, his rights view implies that subsistence hunting is wrong, that is, killing animals for food is wrong even when they are the only available food source, since doing so violates animal rights. We can see that subsistence hunting is wrong on the rights view by seeing why animal experimentation, specifically xenotransplanation, is wrong on the rights view: if it’s wrong to kill an animal to take organs to save a human life, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • On the Currency of Egalitarian Justice.G. A. Cohen - 1989 - Ethics 99 (4):906-944.
    In his Tanner Lecture of 1979 called ‘Equality of What?’ Amartya Sen asked what metric egalitarians should use to establish the extent to which their ideal is realized in a given society. What aspect of a person’s condition should count in a fundamental way for egalitarians, and not merely as cause of or evidence of or proxy for what they regard as fundamental?
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   598 citations  
  • How Should We Aggregate Competing Claims?Alex Voorhoeve - 2014 - Ethics 125 (1):64-87.
    Many believe that we ought to save a large number from being permanently bedridden rather than save one from death. Many also believe that we ought to save one from death rather than a multitude from a very minor harm, no matter how large this multitude. I argue that a principle I call “Aggregate Relevant Claims” satisfactorily explains these judgments. I offer a rationale for this principle and defend it against objections.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   67 citations  
  • Animal Rights and Animal Experiments: An Interest-Based Approach.Alasdair Cochrane - 2007 - Res Publica 13 (3):293-318.
    This paper examines whether non-human animals have a moral right not to be experimented upon. It adopts a Razian conception of rights, whereby an individual possesses a right if an interest of that individual is sufficient to impose a duty on another. To ascertain whether animals have a right not to be experimented on, three interests are examined which might found such a right: the interest in not suffering, the interest in staying alive, and the interest in being free. It (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Case for Animal Rights.Tom Regan - 2009 - In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Noûs. Oxford University Press. pp. 425-434.
    More than twenty years after its original publication, The Case for Animal Rights is an acknowledged classic of moral philosophy, and its author is recognized as the intellectual leader of the animal rights movement. In a new and fully considered preface, Regan responds to his critics and defends the book's revolutionary position.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   611 citations  
  • Can Deontologists Be Moderate?Saul Smilansky - 2003 - Utilitas 15 (1):71.
    There is a widespread view according to which deontology can be construed as a flexible, reasonable view, able to incorporate consequentialist considerations when it seems compelling to do so. According to this view, deontologists can be moderate, and their presentation as die-hard fanatics, even if true to some historical figures, is basically a slanderous and misleading philosophical straw man. I argue that deontologists, properly understood, are not moderate. In the way deontology is typically understood, a deontology, as such, conceptually needs (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • The Realm of Rights.Judith Jarvis Thomson - 1992 - Law and Philosophy 11 (4):449-455.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  • The Case for Animal Rights.Tom Regan - 1985 - Human Studies 8 (4):389-392.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   386 citations  
  • Interspecific Justice.Donald VanDeVeer - 1979 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 22 (1-4):55 – 79.
    This essay supposes that the question of what treatment of animals is morally acceptable cannot be decided in any straightforward way by appeals to 'equal consideration of interests' or to animal rights. Instead it seeks to survey a variety of proposals as to how we ought to adjudicate interspecific conflicts of interests - proposals that are both 'speciesist' and 'non-speciesist' in nature. In the end one proposal is defended as the most reasonable one, and is claimed to provide a partial (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations