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  1. Authority, Responsibility and Education.Richard Stanley Peters - 1959 - New York: Eriksson.
  • Democracy and Education.John Dewey - 1916 - Dover Publications.
    The distinguished author of books on psychology, ethics, and politics, John Dewey specialized in the philosophy of education. In this landmark work on public education, Dewey discusses methods of providing quality public education in a democratic society. First published close to 90 years ago, Democracy and Education sounded the call for a revolution in education, stressing growth, experience, and activity as factors that promote a democratic character in students and lead to the advancement of self and society. Unabridged reproduction of (...)
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  • Collaborative Philosophical Enquiry for School Children.Steve Trickey & Keith Topping - 2007 - Thinking: The Journal of Philosophy for Children 18 (3):25-36.
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  • Identity, Citizenship and Moral Education.Laurance Splitter - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):484-505.
    Questions of identity such as ‘Who am I?’ are often answered by appeals to one or more affiliations with a specific nation (citizenship), culture, ethnicity, religion, etc. Taking as given the idea that identity over time—including identification and re-identification—for objects of a particular kind requires that there be criteria of identity appropriate to things of that kind, I argue that citizenship, as a ‘collectivist’ concept, does not generate such criteria for individual citizens, but that the concept person—which specifies the kind (...)
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  • Philosophy and Ethics in Western Australian Secondary Schools.Stephan Millett & Alan Tapper - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (11):1-13.
    The introduction of Philosophy and Ethics to the Western Australian Certificate of Education courses in 2008 brought philosophy into the Western Australian secondary school curriculum for the first time. How philosophy came to be included is part of a larger story about the commitment and perseverance of a relatively small number of Australian educators and their belief in the value of introducing philosophical communities of inquiry into school classrooms through a revised pedagogy which could sit comfortably with an outcomes-based education (...)
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  • Benefits of Collaborative Philosophical Inquiry in Schools.Stephan Millett & Alan Tapper - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):546-567.
    In the past decade well-designed research studies have shown that the practice of collaborative philosophical inquiry in schools can have marked cognitive and social benefits. Student academic performance improves, and so too does the social dimension of schooling. These findings are timely, as many countries in Asia and the Pacific are now contemplating introducing Philosophy into their curricula. This paper gives a brief history of collaborative philosophical inquiry before surveying the evidence as to its effectiveness. The evidence is canvassed under (...)
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  • Thinking in Education.Matthew Lipman - 1992 - British Journal of Educational Studies 40 (2):187-189.
  • Philosophy for children.Matthew Lipman - 1976 - Metaphilosophy 7 (1):17–33.
  • Practicing Philosophy of childhood: Teaching in the evolutionary mode.David Kennedy - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (1):4-17.
    This article explores the necessary requirements for effective teacher facilitation of community of philosophical inquiry sessions among children, and suggests that the first and most important prerequisite is the capacity to listen to children, which in turn is based on a critical and reflective interrogation of one’s own philosophy of childhood —the set of beliefs and assumptions about children and childhood which adults tend to project onto real children. It argues that the most effective way to explore these assumptions is (...)
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  • The Many Faces of Constructivist Discussion.Clinton Golding - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):467-483.
    Although constructivist discussions in the classroom are often treated as if they were all of the same kind, in this paper I argue that there are subtle but important distinctions that need to be made. An analysis of these distinctions shows that there is a continuum of different constructivist discussions. At one extreme are teacher-directed discussions where students are led to construct the ‘correct’ understanding of a pre-decided conclusion; at the other extreme are unstructured discussions where students are free to (...)
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  • Truth and Method.H. G. Gadamer - 1975 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 36 (4):487-490.
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  • Democracy and Education.Addison W. Moore - 1916 - International Journal of Ethics 26 (4):547-550.
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  • Philosophy for Children.Matthew Lipman - 1976
  • Dewey's Notion of Imagination in Philosophy for Children.Jennifer B. Bleazby - 2012 - Education and Culture 28 (2):95-111.
    Kieran Egan states that imagination "is a concept that has come down to us with a history of suspicion and mistrust" (2007, p. 4). Like experience and the emotions, the imagination is frequently thought to be an obstacle to reason. While reason is conceived of as an abstract, objective and rule-governed method of delivering absolute truths, the imagination is considered "unconstrained, arbitrary, and fanciful," as well as "particular, subjective, and idiosyncratic" (Jo 2002, p. 39). This negative view of the imagination (...)
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  • Developing democratic dispositions and enabling crap detection: Claims for classroom philosophy with special reference to Western Australia and New Zealand.Leon Benade - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (11):1-15.
    The prominence given in national or state-wide curriculum policy to thinking, the development of democratic dispositions and preparation for the ‘good life’, usually articulated in terms of lifelong learning and fulfilment of personal life goals, gives rise to the current spate of interest in the role that could be played by philosophy in schools. Theorists and practitioners working in the area of philosophy for schools advocate the inclusion of philosophy in school curricula to meet these policy objectives. This article tests (...)
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  • Authority, Responsibility and Education.Richard Peters, Paul Halmos & Israel Scheffler - 1961 - Ethics 72 (1):65-67.
     
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  • Ethics and the Community of Inquiry: Education for deliberative democracy.Gilbert Burgh, Terri Field & Mark Freakley - 2006 - South Melbourne: Cengage/Thomson.
    Ethics and the Community of Inquiry gets to the heart of democratic education and how best to achieve it. The book radically reshapes our understanding of education by offering a framework from which to integrate curriculum, teaching and learning and to place deliberative democracy at the centre of education reform. It makes a significant contribution to current debates on educational theory and practice, in particular to pedagogical and professional practice, and ethics education.
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  • Philosophy For Children.Matthew Lipman - 1980 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 1 (1).
    Word of the inauguration of a newsletter on the program in Analytical Thinking that is based in the School of Education at Texas Wesleyan College is indeed welcome. Knowing the energy and expertise of the two administrators of the program, Dean Joe Mitchell and Professor Ronald Reed, I have no doubt that the newsletter will be a success, and I shall look forward to receiving every issue.
     
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  • Thinking in Education.Matthew Lipman - 2003 - British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (3):303-305.
  • Leadership for Creating a Thinking School at Buranda State School.L. Golding, C., Gurr, D., and Hinton & Clinton Golding - 2012 - Journal of Australian Council of Educational Leaders 18 (1):91-106.
    ABSTRACT: This article explores the role of principal leadership in creating a thinking school. It contributes to the school leadership literature by exploring the intersection of two important areas of study in education  school leadership and education for thinking  which is a particularly apt area of study, because effective school leadership is crucial if students are to learn to be critical and creative thinkers, yet this connection has not be widely investigated. We describe how one principal, Hinton, turned (...)
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