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  1. Wittgenstein on Seeing Aspects and Experiencing Meanings.David B. Seligman - 1976 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 37 (2):205-217.
    THE AUTHOR SHOWS THAT WITTGENSTEIN'S PHENOMENOLOGICAL\nSOUNDING TALK IN "PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATIONS", II, XI,\nABOUT "EXPERIENCING MEANINGS" SHOULD BE UNDERSTOOD AS AN\nALTERNATIVE ACCOUNT OF WHAT WITTGENSTEIN ELSEWHERE REFERS\nTO AS THE "FORM OF LIFE" OR TOTAL CONTEXT WITHIN WHICH\nLINGUISTIC MEANING IS ESTABLISHED AND MAINTAINED. THIS IS\nDONE BY DRAWING CERTAIN ANALOGIES WITH THE EXPERIENCE OF\nSEEING ASPECTS OR SEEING ASPECT SHIFTS FAMILIAR TO\nGESTALTIST PSYCHOLOGY. THESE OTHERWISE PUZZLING PASSAGES\nARE THUS SHOWN TO BE OF A PIECE WITH WITTGENSTEIN'S VIEWS\nAS EXPRESSED IN PART I OF THE "INVESTIGATIONS".
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  • Schopenhauer as Educator.Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche - 1965 - Chicago: Regenery.
    Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1844-1900) was a German philosopher. His writing included critiques of religion, morality, contemporary culture, philosophy and science, using a distinctive style and displaying a fondness for aphorism. Nietzsche s influence remains substantial within and beyond philosophy, notably in existentialism and postmodernism. He began his career as a philologist before turning to philosophy. At the age of 24 he became Professor of Classical Philology at the University of Basel, but resigned in 1879 due to health problems, which would (...)
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  • Persecution and the Art of Writing.Leo Strauss - 1952 - University of Chicago Press.
    The essays collected in Persecution and the Art of Writing all deal with one problem--the relation between philosophy and politics. Here, Strauss sets forth the thesis that many philosophers, especially political philosophers, have reacted to the threat of persecution by disguising their most controversial and heterodox ideas.
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  • Pictorial Representation: A Defense of the Aspect Theory.T. E. Wilkerson - 1991 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 16 (1):152-166.
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  • The Ground of Mutuality: Criteria, Judgment and Intelligibility in Stephen Mulhall and Stanley Cavell.Steven G. Affeldt - 1998 - European Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):1-31.
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  • The Givenness of Grammar: A Reply to Steven Affeltd.Steven Mulhall - 1998 - European Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):32-44.
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  • The Givenness of Grammar: A Reply to Steven Affeltd.Steven Mulhall - 1998 - European Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):32–44.
    The article contests Affeldt's critique of Mulhall's "Stanley Cavell: Philosophy's Recounting of the Ordinary," by asking how deep the conflict between what Affeldt proposes as Cavell's account of Wittgenstein's notion of grammar and that of Baker and Hacker really goes. It argues that Affeldt's critique is successful against one interpretation of the claims that grammar consists of a framework of rules and that criteria function as a basis for judgment, but that other interpretations of these claims are available and appear (...)
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  • Self Reliance.Ralph Waldo Emerson - 1841 - In Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays.
    This is Emerson's classic statement of intellectual and moral independence.
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  • The American Scholar.Ralph Waldo Emerson - unknown
    Emerson's famous declaration of independence for American literature.
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  • X—Wittgenstein's Builders.R. Rhees - 1960 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 60 (1):171-186.
  • Persecution and the Art of Writing.George H. Sabine - 1952 - Ethics 63 (3):220-222.
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  • Declining Decline: Wittgenstein as a Philosopher of Culture.Stanley Cavell - 1988 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 31 (3):253 – 264.
    Granted a certain depth of accuracy in citing an aspect of Spengler as an enactment of an aspect of Wittgenstein's thought, Wittgenstein's difference from Spengler should have depth. One difference can be characterized by saying that in the Investigations Wittgenstein diurnalizes Spengler's vision of the destiny toward exhausted forms, toward nomadism, toward loss of culture, or of home, or community: he depicts our everyday encounters with philosophy, with our ideals, as brushes with skepticism, wherein the ancient task of philosophy, to (...)
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  • Relations, Internal and External.Richard Rorty - 1967 - In Paul Edwards (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Philosophy. New York: Macmillan. pp. 8--125.
     
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  • Exoteric Teaching.Leo Strauss & Kenneth Green - 1986 - Interpretation 14 (1):51-59.
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