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Aristotle on Motion in Incomplete Animals

Apeiron 53 (3):285-314 (2020)

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  1. Qui a peur de l'éthologie? Action humaine et action animale chez Aristote.Pierre-Marie Morel - 2013 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 11:91-100.
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  • Aristotle on Pneuma and Animal Self-Motion.Sylvia Berryman - 2002 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy: Volume Xxiii: Winter 2002. Oxford University Press.
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  • Chapter 4. Self-Movement and External Causation.Susan Sauvé Meyer - 2017 - In Mary Louise Gill & James G. Lennox (eds.), Self-Motion: From Aristotle to Newton. Princeton University Press. pp. 65-80.
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  • Chapter 2. Aristotle on Self-Motion.Mary Louise Gill - 2017 - In Mary Louise Gill & James G. Lennox (eds.), Self-Motion: From Aristotle to Newton. Princeton University Press. pp. 15-34.
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  • Individuals.P. F. Strawson - 1959 - Garden City, N.Y.: Routledge.
    Since its publication in 1959, Individuals has become a modern philosophical classic. Bold in scope and ambition, it continues to influence debates in metaphysics, philosophy of logic and language, and epistemology. Peter Strawson's most famous work, it sets out to describe nothing less than the basic subject matter of our thought. It contains Strawson's now famous argument for descriptive metaphysics and his repudiation of revisionary metaphysics, in which reality is something beyond the world of appearances. Throughout, Individuals advances some highly (...)
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  • Streben Und Bewegen: Aristoteles' Theorie der Animalischen Ortsbewegung.Klaus Corcilius - 2008 - Walter de Gruyter.
    How do animals make themselves move? Unlike most modern theories, Aristotle answers this question through a general theory of animal movement valid for both humans and animals. This book interprets this theory and analyses its fundamental concepts.
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  • Why Aristotle Needs Imagination.Victor Caston - 1996 - Phronesis 41 (1):20-55.
  • Individuals.P. F. Strawson - 1959 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 14 (2):246-246.
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  • Aristotle on demarcating the five senses.Richard Sorabji - 1971 - Philosophical Review 80 (1):55-79.
  • Aristotle on sense perception.Thomas J. Slakey - 1961 - Philosophical Review 70 (4):470-484.
  • Aristotle De Anima (On the Soul). [REVIEW]Christopher Shields - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):202-205.
  • Aristotle De Anima (On the Soul). [REVIEW]Christopher Shields - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):202-205.
    Christopher Shields presents a new translation and commentary of Aristotle's De Anima, a work of interest to philosophers at all levels, as well as psychologists and students interested in the nature of life and living systems. The volume provides a full translation of the complete work, together with a comprehensive commentary. While sensitive to philological and textual matters, the commentary addresses itself to the philosophical reader who wishes to understand and assess Aristotle's accounts of the soul and body; perception; thinking; (...)
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  • Images, Appearances, and Phantasia in Aristotle.Krisanna M. Scheiter - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (3):251-278.
    Abstract Aristotle's account of Phantasia in De Anima 3.3 is notoriously difficult to decipher. At one point he describes Phantasia as a capacity for producing images, but then later in the same chapter it is clear Phantasia is supposed to explain appearances, such as why the sun appears to be a foot wide. Many commentators argue that images cannot explain appearances, and so they claim that Aristotle is using Phantasia in two different ways. In this paper I argue that images (...)
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  • Aristotle and chrysippus on the psychology of human action: Criteria for responsibility.Priscilla K. Sakezles - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):225 – 252.
    This Article doDespite obvious differences in the Aristotelian and Stoic theories of responsibility, there is surprisingly a deeper structural similarity between the two. The most obvious difference is that Aristotle is (apparently) a libertarian and the Stoics are determinists. Aristotle holds adults responsible for all our "voluntary" actions, which are defined by two criteria: the "origin" or cause of the action must be "in us" and we must be aware of what we are doing. An "involuntary" action, for which we (...)
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  • Dirtying Aristotle's Hands? Aristotle's Analysis of 'Mixed Acts' in the Nicomachean Ethics III, 1.Karen Nielsen - 2007 - Phronesis 52 (3):270-300.
    The analysis of 'mixed acts' in Nicomachean Ethics III, 1 has led scholars to attribute a theory of 'dirty hands' and 'impossible oughts' to Aristode. Michael Stocker argues that Aristode recognizes particular acts that are simultaneously 'right, even obligatory', but nevertheless 'wrong, shameful and the like'. And Martha Nussbaum commends Aristotle for not sympathizing 'with those who, in politics or in private affairs, would so shrink from blame and from unacceptable action that they would be unable to take a necessary (...)
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  • Qui a peur de l'éthologie? Action humaine et action animale chez Aristote.Pierre-Marie Morel - 2013 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 11:91-100.
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  • Qui a peur de l'éthologie ? Action humaine et action animale chez Aristote.Pierre-Marie Morel - 2013 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 11:91-100.
    On décèle une tension entre deux tendances dans la philosophie aristotélicienne de la praxis : d’une part; une insistance claire sur la spécificité de l’action humaine par rapport à la conduite animale ; d’autre part; la volonté de définir un genre commun pour les différents types d’activités; humaines et animales. Si cette tension peut être surmontée; c’est sans doute en distinguant les différents registres (axiologique; psychologique; éthologique) du discours aristotélicien. C’est aussi en précisant le type de ressemblance qui; à la (...)
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  • Aristotle: the power of perception.Deborah K. W. Modrak - 1987 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Agency and Responsibility in Aristotle's Eudemian Ethics.Jozef Müller - 2015 - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 60 (2):206-251.
    I defend two main theses. First, I argue that Aristotle’s account of voluntary action focuses on the conditions under which one is the cause of one’s actions in virtue of being (qua) the individual one is. Aristotle contrasts voluntary action not only with involuntary action but also with cases in which one acts (or does something) due to one’s nature (for example, in virtue of being a member of a certain species) rather than due to one’s own desires (i.e. qua (...)
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  • Aristotle, teleology, and reduction.Susan Sauvé Meyer - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (4):791-825.
  • Aristotle's Notion of the Voluntary.J. McGinley - 1980 - Apeiron 14 (2):125 - 133.
  • Aristotle: The Power of Perception.Tim Maudlin & Deborah K. W. Modrak - 1990 - Philosophical Review 99 (2):305.
  • Aristotle on the Organ of Touch.Gareth B. Matthews - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (2):327-337.
  • Imagination humaine et imagination animale chez Aristote.Jean-Louis Labarrière - 1984 - Phronesis 29 (1):17-49.
  • Aristotle's De Anima : On Why the Soul is Not a Set of Capacities.Rebekah Johnston - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):185-200.
    Although it is common for interpreters of Aristotle's De Anima to treat the soul as a specially related set of powers of capacities, I argue against this view on the grounds that the plausible options for reconciling the claim that the soul is a set of powers with Aristotle's repeated claim that the soul is an actuality cannot be unsuccessful. Moreover, I argue that there are good reasons to be wary of attributing to Aristotle the view that the soul is (...)
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  • Aristotle and the Spheres of Motivation: De Anima III.11.D. S. Hutchinson - 1990 - Dialogue 29 (1):7-.
    Motivations can often conflict. Suppose it is six o'clock and I want a drink; suppose also that I know that it would be unwise or inappropriate in my present circumstances to drink. In cases like this I feel a struggle inside me. For Plato and for Aristotle, such struggles were an important part of moral experience, and on their description and analysis depends much of Plato's and Aristotle's moral psychology. It is not well enough appreciated that, in this respect, Aristotle (...)
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  • Merely Living Animals in Aristotle.Refik Güremen - 2015 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 9 (1):115.
    : In Parts of Animals II.10, 655b37-656a8, Aristotle tacitly identifies a group of animals which partake of “ living only”. This paper is an attempt to understand the nature of this group. It is argued that it is possible to make sense of this designation if we consider that some animals, which are solely endowed with the contact senses, do nothing more than mere immediate nutrition by their perceptive nature and have no other action. It is concluded that some of (...)
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  • Aristotle’s Model of Animal Motion.Pavel Gregoric & Klaus Corcilius - 2013 - Phronesis 58 (1):52-97.
    In this paper we argue that Aristotle operates with a particular theoretical model in his explanation of animal locomotion, what we call the ‘centralized incoming and outgoing motions’ model. We show how the model accommodates more complex cases of animal motion and how it allows Aristotle to preserve the intuition that animals are self-movers, without jeopardizing his arguments for the eternity of motion and the necessary existence of one eternal unmoved mover in Physics VIII. The CIOM model helps to elucidate (...)
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  • Aristotle on Knowledge and the Sense of Touch.Michael Golluber - 2001 - Journal of Philosophical Research 26:655-680.
    This paper on Aristotle’s De Amilla attempts to understand the treatise as a unified whole---a unity, it may be argued, that is only as problematic as is the unity of the soul of which it speaks. Aristotle’s treatise on the soul must strike its reader as being all too perplexing, and the subject of touch in particular seems to arouse such perplexity. But Aristotle would have it that “in our inquiry into the soul, in going forward, we must be thoroughly (...)
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  • Aristotle on Knowledge and the Sense of Touch.Michael Golluber - 2001 - Journal of Philosophical Research 26:655-680.
    This paper on Aristotle’s De Amilla attempts to understand the treatise as a unified whole---a unity, it may be argued, that is only as problematic as is the unity of the soul of which it speaks. Aristotle’s treatise on the soul must strike its reader as being all too perplexing, and the subject of touch in particular seems to arouse such perplexity. But Aristotle would have it that “in our inquiry into the soul, in going forward, we must be thoroughly (...)
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  • Aristotle on the Sense-Organs.Todd Ganson & T. K. Johansen - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (1):89.
    Aristotle’s philosophy of mind is often understood as anticipating present-day functionalist approaches to the mental. In Aristotle on the Sense-Organs Johansen argues at length that such interpretations of what Aristotle has to say about the senses are untenable. First, Aristotle does not allow that the matter of a sense-organ can be identified without reference to the form or function of the organ, so sense-organs are not compositionally plastic. Second, Aristotle’s conception of sense-perception is radically different from anything a philosopher today, (...)
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  • Aristotle on Self-Change in Plants.Daniel Coren - 2019 - Rhizomata 7 (1):33-62.
    A lot of scholarly attention has been given to Aristotle’s account of how and why animals are capable of moving themselves. But no one has focused on the question, whether self-change is possible in plants on Aristotle’s account. I first give some context and explain why this topic is worth exploring. I then turn to Aristotle’s conditions for self-change given in Physics VIII.4, where he argues that the natural motion of the elements does not count as self-motion. I apply those (...)
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  • Aristotle's ethics.David Bostock - 2000 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    In this fascinating introduction, David Bostock presents a fresh perspective on one of the great classics of moral philosophy: Aristotle's Nicomachaen Ethics. He argues that it is, and deserves to be, Aristotle's most widely studied work, for much of what it has to say is still important for today's debate on the problems of ethics. Here, Bostock guides the reader through explanations and evaluations of all the main themes of the work, exploring questions of interpretation and the differing views of (...)
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  • Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics.Roger Crisp (ed.) - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, based on lectures that he gave in Athens in the fourth century BCE, is one of the most significant works in moral philosophy, and has profoundly influenced the whole course of subsequent philosophical endeavour. It is soundly located within a philosophical tradition, but its argument differs markedly from those of Plato and Socrates in its emphasis on the exercise - as opposed to the mere possession - of virtue as the key to human happiness, offering seminal discussions (...)
     
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  • Aristotle on the Sense-Organs.T. K. Johansen - 1997 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers an important study of Aristotle's theory of the sense-organs. It aims to answer two questions central to Aristotle's psychology and biology: why does Aristotle think we have sense-organs, and why does he describe the sense-organs in the way he does? The author looks at all the Aristotelian evidence for the five senses and shows how pervasively Aristotle's accounts of the sense-organs are motivated by his interest in form and function. The book also engages with the celebrated problem (...)
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  • Aristotle on the apparent good: perception, phantasia, thought, and desire.Jessica Moss - 2012 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Pt. I. The apparent good. Evaluative cognition -- Perceiving the good -- Phantasia and the apparent good -- pt. II. The apparent good and non-rational motivation. Passions and the apparent good -- Akrasia and the apparent good -- pt. III. The apparent good and rational motivation. Phantasia and deliberation -- Happiness, virtue, and the apparent good -- Practical induction -- Conclusion : Aristotle's practical empiricism.
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  • Aristotle on Desire.Giles Pearson - 2012 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Desire is a central concept in Aristotle's ethical and psychological works, but he does not provide us with a systematic treatment of the notion itself. This book reconstructs the account of desire latent in his various scattered remarks on the subject and analyses its role in his moral psychology. Topics include: the range of states that Aristotle counts as desires ; objects of desire and the relation between desires and envisaging prospects; desire and the good; Aristotle's three species of desire: (...)
  • Nature, Change, and Agency in Aristotle's Physics: A Philosophical Study.Sarah Waterlow - 1982 - New York: Clarendon Press.
    An investigation into Aristotle's metaphysics of nature as expounded in the Physics. It focuses in particular his conception of change, a concept which is shown to possess a unique metaphysical structure, with implications that should engage the attention of contemporary analysis. First published in hardback in 1982, the book is now available for the first time in paperback. 'A powerful and appealing explanatory scheme which succeeds on the whole in drawing together a great many seemingly disparate elements in the Physics (...)
  • Aristotle’s “De Anima”: A Critical Commentary.Ronald Polansky - 2007 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle's De Anima is the first systematic philosophical account of the soul, which serves to explain the functioning of all mortal living things. In his commentary, Ronald Polansky argues that the work is far more structured and systematic than previously supposed. He contends that Aristotle seeks a comprehensive understanding of the soul and its faculties. By closely tracing the unfolding of the many-layered argumentation and the way Aristotle fits his inquiry meticulously within his scheme of the sciences, Polansky answers questions (...)
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  • The brute within: appetitive desire in Plato and Aristotle.Hendrik Lorenz - 2006 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Hendrik Lorenz presents a comprehensive study of Plato's and Aristotle's conceptions of non-rational desire. They see this as something that humans share with animals, and which aims primarily at the pleasures of food, drink, and sex. Lorenz explores the cognitive resources that both philosophers make available for the explanation of such desires, and what they take rationality to add to the motivational structure of human beings. In doing so, he finds conceptions of the mind that are coherent and deeply integrated (...)
  • Aristotle on pneuma and animal self-motion.Sylvia Berryman - 2002 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 23:85-97.
  • Aristotle against (unqualified) self-motion: Physics VII 1 α241b35-242a49 / β241b25-242a15.Daniel Coren - forthcoming - Ancient Philosophy.
    It is well known that Aristotle tries to make room for self-motion – an idea he inherits to some extent from Plato – within his other commitments to causal determinism while at the same time modifying the idea. However, one argument in Physics VII 1 seems to pose a problem for the bare possibility of self-motion; in it he seems to argue that everything that moves must be moved by something else. The text in which this argument appears is itself (...)
     
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  • Aristotle's De Motu Animalium.Martha Craven Nussbaum - 1978 - Journal of the History of Biology 13 (2):351-356.
     
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  • Aristotle's De motu animalium.Martha Craven Nussbaum - 1978 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 43 (2):378-378.
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