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  1. Science, Coloniality, and “the Great Rationality Divide”.Malin Ideland - 2018 - Science & Education 27 (7-8):783-803.
    This article aims to analyze how science is discursively attached to certain parts of the world and certain “kinds of people,” i.e., how scientific knowledge is culturally connected to the West and to whiteness. In focus is how the power technology of coloniality organizes scientific content in textbooks as well as how science students are met in the classroom. The empirical data consist of Swedish science textbooks. The analysis is guided by three questions: if and how the colonial history of (...)
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  • Research Methods in Education.L. Cohen, L. Manion & K. Morrison - 2000 - British Journal of Educational Studies 48 (4):446-446.
  • The Colonizer and the Colonized.Albert Memmi - 1970 - Becaon Press.
    Originally published: 1st American ed. New York: Orion Press, 1965. With new afterword.
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  • Science and Social Inequality: Feminist and Postcolonial Issues.Sandra G. Harding - 2006 - University of Illinois Press.
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  • Powerful learners and critical agents: The goals of five urban Caribbean youth in a conceptual physics classroom.Sreyashi Jhumki Basu - 2008 - Science Education 92 (2):252-277.
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  • After Eurocentrism: Challenges for the Philosophy of Science.Sandra Harding - 1992 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:311 - 319.
    Two themes in postcolonial science studies pose unusual challenges for philosophers of science. According to these accounts, the cognitive/technical core of Western sciences, not just their technologies, applications, and social institutions, is permeated by distinctive cultural and political commitments. In this sense, Western sciences are "ethnosciences." Moreover, these analysts want to delink their societies' scientific and technological projects from the West's in order to develop fully modern sciences within their own culturally distinctive scientific traditions. This paper suggests some fruitful ways (...)
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