Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Charity Law and the Liberal State.Matthew Harding - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Charity Law and the Liberal State considers questions relating to state action and public discourse that are raised by the law of charity. Informed by liberal philosophical commitments and of interest to both charity lawyers and political philosophers, it addresses themes and topics such as: the justifiability of the state's non-neutral promotion of charitable purposes; the role of altruism in charity law; charity law, the tax system and the demands of distributive justice; the proper treatment of religious and political purposes (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Group Agency: The Possibility, Design, and Status of Corporate Agents.Christian List & Philip Pettit - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Are companies, churches, and states genuine agents? Or are they just collections of individuals that give a misleading impression of unity? This question is important, since the answer dictates how we should explain the behaviour of these entities and whether we should treat them as responsible and accountable on the model of individual agents. Group Agency offers a new approach to that question and is relevant, therefore, to a range of fields from philosophy to law, politics, and the social sciences. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   403 citations  
  • Ethical Dilemmas in Management.Christina Garsten & Tor Hernes (eds.) - 2008 - Routledge.
    Each case study defines:The dilemma in questionThe context of the organizational/management settingThe conditions that create the dilemmaThe courses of action ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Specters, Inc.: The Elusive Basis of the Corporation.Jeroen Veldman & Martin Parker - 2012 - Business and Society Review 117 (4):413-441.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Corporate Moral Agency.Denis G. Arnold - 2006 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):279–291.
    "The main conclusion of this essay is that it is plausible to conclude that corporations are capable of exhibiting intentionality, and as a result that they may be properly understood as moral agents" (p. 281).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Shareholder Theory and Kant’s ‘Duty of Beneficence’.Samuel Mansell - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):583-599.
    This article draws on the moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant to explore whether a corporate ‘duty of beneficence’ to non-shareholders is consistent with the orthodox ‘shareholder theory’ of the firm. It examines the ethical framework of Milton Friedman’s argument and asks whether it necessarily rules out the well-being of non-shareholders as a corporate objective. The article examines Kant’s distinction between ‘duties of right’ and ‘duties of virtue’ (the latter including the duty of beneficence) and investigates their consistency with the shareholder (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Reason, Rationality, and Fiduciary Duty.Steve Lydenberg - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (3):1-16.
    This paper argues that since the last decades of the twentieth century the discipline of modern finance has directed fiduciaries to act "rationally"—that is, in the sole financial interest of their funds--downplaying the effects of their investments on others. This approach has deemphasized a previous, more "reasonable" interpretation of fiduciary duty that drew on a conception of prudence characterized by wisdom, discretion and intelligence—one that accounts to a greater degree for the relationship between one's investments and their effects on others (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Corporate Moral Agency: Review and Implications. [REVIEW]Geoff Moore - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 21 (4):329 - 343.
    The debate concerning corporate moral agency is normally conducted through philosophical arguments in articles which argue from only one point of view. This paper summarises both the arguments for and against corporate moral agency and concludes from this that the arguments in favour have more weight. The paper also addresses the way in which the law in the U.K. and the U.S.A. currently views this issue and shows how it is supportive of the concept of corporate moral agency. The paper (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  • Introduction.John Stratton Hawley - 2007 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 11 (3):209-225.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Reflections on Corporate Moral Responsibility and the Problem Solving Technique of Alexander the Great.John Hasnas - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (2):183-195.
    The academic debate over the propriety of attributing moral responsibility to corporations is decades old and ongoing. The conventional approach to this debate is to identify the sufficient conditions for moral agency and then attempt to determine whether corporations possess them. This article recommends abandoning the conventional approach in favor of an examination of the practical consequences of corporate moral responsibility. The article’s thesis is that such an examination reveals that attributing moral responsibility to corporations is ethically acceptable only if (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Debunking Corporate Moral Responsibility.Manuel Velasquez - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (4):531-562.
    I address three topics. First, I argue that the issue of corporate moral responsibility is an important one for business ethics.Second, I examine a core argument for the claim that the corporate organization is a separate moral agent and show it is based on anunnoticed but elementary mistake deriving from the fallacy of division. Third, I examine the assumptions collectivists make about whatit means to say that organizations act and that they act intentionally and show that these assumptions are mistaken (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   63 citations  
  • Responsibility Incorporated.Philip Pettit - 2007 - Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy 38 (2):90-117.
    Incorporated groups include businesses, universities, churches and the like. Organized to act as single centers of agency, they also routinely satisfy the three conditions that make an agent fit to be held responsible: they face significant choices, can recognize the relative value of different options, and are able to choose in sensitivity to such values. But is it redundant to hold a corporate agent responsible for something, when certain members are also held responsible for the individual parts they play? No (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   118 citations  
  • Responsibility Incorporated.Philip Pettit - 2007 - Ethics 117 (2):171-201.
    The Herald of Free Enterprise, a ferry operating in the English Channel, sank on March 6, 1987, drowning nearly two hundred people. The official inquiry found that the company running the ferry was extremely sloppy, with poor routines of checking and management. “From top to bottom the body corporate was infected with the disease of sloppiness.”1 But the courts did not penalize anyone in what might seem to be an appropriate measure, failing to identify individuals in the company or on (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   165 citations  
  • Corporate Versus Individual Moral Responsibility.C. Soares - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 46 (2):143 - 150.
    There is a clear tendency in contemporary political/legal thought to limit agency to individual agents, thereby denying the existence and relevance of collective moral agency in general, and corporate agency in particular. This tendency is ultimately rooted in two particular forms of individualism – methodological and fictive (abstract) – which have their source in the Enlightenment. Furthermore, the dominant notion of moral agency owes a lot to Kant whose moral/legal philosophy is grounded exclusively on abstract reason and personal autonomy, to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • The Corporation as a Moral Person.Peter A. French - 1979 - American Philosophical Quarterly 16 (3):207 - 215.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   215 citations  
  • Corporate Responsibility and Corporate Personhood.Rita C. Manning - 1984 - Journal of Business Ethics 3 (1):77 - 84.
    In this paper, I consider the claim that a corporation cannot be held to be morally responsible unless it is a person. First, I argue that this claim is ambigious. Person flags three different but related notions: metaphysical person, moral agent, moral person. I argue that, though one can make the claim that corporates are metaphysical persons, this claim is only marginally relevant to the question of corporate moral responsibility. The central question which must be answered in discussions of corporate (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • The Central Distinction in the Theory of Corporate Moral Personhood.Raymond S. Pfeiffer - 1990 - Journal of Business Ethics 9 (6):473-480.
    Peter French has argued that conglomerate collectivities such as business corporations are moral persons and that aggregate collectivities such as lynch mobs are not. Two arguments are advanced to show that French's claim is flawed. First, the distinction between aggregates and conglomerates is, at best, a distinction of degree, not kind. Moreover, some aggregates show evidence of moral personhood. Second, French's criterion for distinguishing aggregates and conglomerates is based on inadequate grounds. Application of the criterion to specific cases requires an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Trust and Corporation (Extracts).F. W. Maitland - 1995 - In Julia Stapleton (ed.), Group Rights: Perspectives Since 1900. Thoemmes Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations