Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Global Rules and Private Actors: Toward A New Role of The Transnational Corporation In Global Governance.Andreas Georg Scherer, Guido Palazzo & Dorothée Baumann - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):505-532.
    We discuss the role that transnational corporations should play in developing global governance, creating a frameworkof rules and regulations for the global economy. The central issue is whether TNCs should provide global rules and guarantee individual citizenship rights, or instead focus on maximizing profits. First, we describe the problems arising from the globalization process that affect the relationship between public rules and private firms. Next we consider the position of economic and management theories in relation to the social responsibility of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   139 citations  
  • Where Is the Accountability in International Accountability Standards?: A Decoupling Perspective.Michael Behnam & Tammy L. Maclean - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (1):45-72.
    A common complaint by academics and practitioners is that the application of international accountability standards does not lead to significant improvements in an organization’s social responsibility. When organizations espouse their commitment to IAS but do not put forth the effort necessary to operationally enact that commitment, a “credibility cover” is created that perpetuates business as usual. In other words, the legitimacy that organizations gain by formally adopting the standards may shield the organization from closer scrutiny, thus enabling rather than constraining (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • Bad Apples In Bad Barrels Revisited: Cognitive Moral Development, Just World Beliefs, Rewards, and Ethical Decision-Making.Neal M. Ashkanasy, Carolyn A. Windsor & Linda K. Treviño - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):449-473.
    In this study, we test the interactive effect on ethical decision-making of personal characteristics, and personal expectanciesbased on perceptions of organizational rewards and punishments. Personal characteristics studied were cognitive moral developmentand belief in a just world. Using an in-basket simulation, we found that exposure to reward system information influenced managers’ outcome expectancies. Further, outcome expectancies and belief in a just world interacted with managers’ cognitive moral development to influence managers’ ethical decision-making. In particular, low-cognitive moral development managers who expected that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  • Getting Real: Stakeholder Theory, Managerial Practice, and the General Irrelevance of Fiduciary Duties Owed to Shareholders.Andrew Wicks - 1999 - Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (2):273-293.
    Stakeholder theorists have generally misunderstood the nature and ramifications of the fiduciary responsibilities that corporate directors owe their stockholders. This fiduciary duty requires the exercise of care, loyalty, and honesty with regard to the financial interests of stockholders. Such obligations do not conflict with the normative goals of stakeholder theory, nor, after a century of case law that includes Dodge Bros. v. Ford, do fiduciary responsibilities owed shareholders prevent managerial policies that are generous orsensitive to other corporate stakeholders. The common (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  • Is Formal Ethics Training Merely Cosmetic? In Advance.Danielle E. Warren, Joseph Gaspar & William S. Laufer - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (1).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Is Formal Ethics Training Merely Cosmetic?: A Study of Ethics Training and Ethical Organizational Culture.Danielle E. Warren, Joseph P. Gaspar & William S. Laufer - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (1):85-117.
    U.S. Organizational Sentencing Guidelines provide firms with incentives to develop formal ethics programs to promote ethical organizational cultures and thereby decrease corporate offenses. Yet critics argue such programs are cosmetic. Here we studied bank employees before and after the introduction of formal ethics training—an important component of formal ethics programs—to examine the effects of training on ethical organizational culture. Two years after a single training session, we find sustained, positive effects on indicators of an ethical organizational culture . While espoused (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  • Accountability in a Global Economy: The Emergence of International Accountability Standards.Sandra Waddock - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (1):23-44.
    This article assesses the proliferation of international accountability standards (IAS) in the recent past. We provide a comprehensive overview about the different types of standards and discuss their role as part of a new institutional infrastructure for corporate responsibility. Based on this, it is argued that IAS can advance corporate responsibility on a global level because they contribute to the closure of some omnipresent governance gaps. IAS also improve the preparedness of an organization to give an explanation and a justification (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  • Why Ethics Matters: A Defense of Ethics in Business Organizations.Manuel Velasqusez - 1996 - Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (2):201-222.
    I argue that Plato was right in claiming that justice is more profitable, more rational, and more intrinsically valuable than injustice, and that this is particularly true for business organizations. The research on prisoners’ dilemmas and social dilemmas shows that ethical behavior is more profitable and more rational than unethical behavior in terms of both the negative sanctions on unethical behavior when interactions with stakeholders are iterated, and the positive rewards of habitually ethical behavior when stakeholders can identify those who (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Why Ethics Matters: A Defense of Ethics in Business Organizations.Manuel Velasqusez - 1996 - Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (2):201-222.
    I argue that Plato was right in claiming that justice is more profitable, more rational, and more intrinsically valuable than injustice, and that this is particularly true for business organizations. The research on prisoners’ dilemmas and social dilemmas shows that ethical behavior is more profitable and more rational than unethical behavior in terms of both the negative sanctions on unethical behavior when interactions with stakeholders are iterated, and the positive rewards of habitually ethical behavior when stakeholders can identify those who (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Normative and Empirical Business Ethics: Separation, Marriage of Convenience, or Marriage of Necessity?Linda Klebe Trevino - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (2):129-143.
    This paper outlines three conceptions of the relationship between normative and empirical business ethics, views we refer to as parallel, symbiotic, and integrative. Parallelism rejects efforts to link normative and empirical inquiry, for both conceptual and practical reasons. The symbiotic position supports a practical relationship in which normative and/or empirical business ethics rely on each other for guidance in setting agenda or in applying the results of their conceptually and methodologically distinct inquiries. Theoretical integration countenances a deeper merging of prima (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   76 citations  
  • Experimental Approaches to Studying Ethical-Unethical Behavior in Organizations.Linda Klebe Trevino - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (2):121-136.
    The social scientific study of ethical-unethical behavior in work organizations is in an early stage of development. This paper discusses some of the problems of conducting social scientific research in this area and explores the potential contribution of experimental research approaches. Both laboratory and field experimentation allow the investigator to test theory-based hypotheses and to study causal relations. Examples are provided of investigations that have applied these methods to the study of business ethics.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • Compliance and Values Oriented Ethics Programs: Influences on Employees’ Attitudes and Behavior.Linda Klebe Treviño - 1999 - Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (2):315-335.
    Previous research has identified multiple approaches to the design and implementation of corporate ethics programs (Paine, 1994;Weaver, Treviño, and Cochran, in press b; Treviño, Weaver, Gibson, and Toffler, in press). This field survey in a large financial servicescompany investigated the relationships of the values and compliance orientations in an ethics program to a diverse set of outcomes.Employees’ perceptions that the company ethics program is oriented toward affirming ethical values were associated with seven outcomes. Perceptions of a compliance orientation were associated (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   85 citations  
  • When Does Ethical Leadership Affect Workplace Incivility? The Moderating Role of Follower Personality.Shannon G. Taylor & Marshall W. Pattie - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (4):595-616.
  • Confucian Skepticism About Workplace Rights.Alan Strudler - 2008 - Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (1):67-83.
    Confucian scholars express skepticism about rights. This skepticism is relevant to managers who face issues about the recognition of workplace rights in a Confucian culture. My essay examines the foundations of this skepticism, and the cogency of potential leading Western liberal responses to it. I conclude that Confucian skepticism is more formidable than liberals have recognized. I attempt to craft an argument that defuses Confucian skepticism about workplace rights while at the same time respecting the moral depth of Confucianism.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Ethics Programs and The Paradox of Control.Jason Stansbury & Bruce Barry - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (2):239-261.
    We analyze corporate ethics programs as control systems, arguing that how control is exercised may have pernicious consequencesand be morally problematic. In particular, the control cultivated by ethics programs may weaken employees’ ability and motivation toexercise their own moral judgment, especially in novel situations. We develop this argument first by examining how organization theorists analyze control as an instrument of management coordination, and by addressing the political implications of control. We discuss coercive and enabling control as variations that help account (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  • Managing Social-Business Tensions: A Review and Research Agenda for Social Enterprise.Wendy K. Smith, Michael Gonin & Marya L. Besharov - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (3):407-442.
    In a world filled with poverty, environmental degradation, and moral injustice, social enterprises offer a ray of hope. These organizations seek to achieve social missions through business ventures. Yet social missions and business ventures are associated with divergent goals, values, norms, and identities. Attending to them simultaneously creates tensions, competing demands, and ethical dilemmas. Effectively understanding social enterprises therefore depends on insight into the nature and management of these tensions. While existing research recognizes tensions between social missions and business ventures, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  • The Common Good of the Firm in the Aristotelian-Thomistic Tradition.Alejo José G. Sison & Joan Fontrodona - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):211-246.
    This article proposes a theory of the firm based on the common good. It clarifies the meaning of the term “common good” tracing its historical development. Next, an analogous sense applicable to the firm is derived from its original context in political theory. Put simply, the common good of the firm is the production of goods and services needed for flourishing, in which different members participate through work. This is linked to the political common good through subsidiarity. Lastly, implications and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
  • Does Business Ethics Make Economic Sense?Amartya Sen - 1993 - Business Ethics Quarterly 3 (1):45-54.
    The importance of business ethics is not contrdicted in any way by Adam Smith’s pointer to the fact that our “regards to our own interests” provide adequate motivation tor exchange. There are many important economic relationships other than exchange, such as the institution of production and arrangements of distribution. Here business ethics can playa major part. Even as far as exchange is concerned, business ethics can be crucially important in terms of organization and behavior, going weil beyond basic motivation.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  • Organizational Moral Values.Elizabeth D. Scott - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (1):33-56.
    Abstract: This article argues that the important organizational values to study are organizational moral values. It identifies five moral values (honest communication, respect for property, respect for life, respect for religion, and justice), which allow parallel constructs at individual and organizational levels of analysis. It also identifies dimensions used in differentiating organizations’ moral values. These are the act, actor, person affected, intention, and expected result. Finally, the article addresses measurement issues associated with organizational moral values, proposing that content analysis is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Global Rules and Private Actors: Toward a New Role of the Transnational Corporation in Global Governance.Andreas Georg Scherer, Guido Palazzo & Dorothée Baumann - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):505-532.
    : We discuss the role that transnational corporations should play in developing global governance, creating a framework of rules and regulations for the global economy. The central issue is whether TNCs should provide global rules and guarantee individual citizenship rights, or instead focus on maximizing profits. First, we describe the problems arising from the globalization process that affect the relationship between public rules and private firms. Next we consider the position of economic and management theories in relation to the social (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   154 citations  
  • The Importance of Value Diversity in Corporate Life.Michael Santoro - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (4):433-452.
    Donaldson and Dunfee (1999) suggest in a brief discussion that a manager may in some cases rely on his or her own values inmaking organizational decisions. Our paper examines the role of diversity in values in an organizational context. Our central contentionis that value diversity among managers, employees, and other stakeholders on dimensions such as prudence-boldness, clarity-flexibility, and rigor-mercy is highly useful for an organization. We introduce nontechnical models of individual and board decision-making in which value diversity cuts across group (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Interactive Effects of External Environmental Conditions and Internal Firm Characteristics on Mnes' Choice of Strategy in the Development of a Code of Conduct.Linda M. Sama - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):137-166.
    Abstract: Effects of globalization have amplified the magnitude and frequency of corporate abuses, particularly in developing economies where weak or absent rules undermine social norms and principles. Improving multinational enterprises’ (MNEs) ethical conduct is a factor of both the ability of firms to change behaviors in the direction of the moral good, and their willingness to do so. Constraints and enablers of a firm’s ability to act ethically emanate from the external environment, including the industry environment of which the firm (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • The Effect of Organizational Forces on Individual Morality: Judgment, Moral Approbation, and Behavior.Lori Verstegen Ryan - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):431-445.
    To date, our understanding of ethical decision making and behavior in organizations has been concentrated in the area of moraljudgment, largely because of the hundreds of studies done involving cognitive moral development. This paper addresses the problemof our relative lack of understanding in other areas of human morality by applying a recently developed construct—moral approbation—to illuminate the link between moral judgment and moral action. This recent work is extended here by exploring the effect thatorganizations have on ethical behavior in terms (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Extending the Deontic Model of Justice: Moral Self-Regulation in Third-Party Responses to Injustice.Deborah E. Rupp & Chris M. Bell - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (1):89-106.
    The deontic model of justice and ethical behavior proposes that people care about justice simply for the sake of justice. This is an important consideration for business ethics because it implies that justice and ethical behavior are naturally occurring phenomena independent of system controls or individual self-interest. To date, research on the deontic model and third-party reactions to injustice has focused primarily on individuals’ tendency topunishtransgressors. This research has revealed that witnesses to injustice will consider sacrificing their own resources if (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Special Issue: "Business Ethics in a Global Economy".Edward J. Romar - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (4):663-678.
    :Opportunism impacts the behavior of firms in market situations where they purchase goods and services externally and create dependency relationships with other firms. Opportunism as a business issue is addressed in economics and marketing literature as an important factor in transaction cost analysis and market governance. Management and business ethics scholars, however, do not address this issue in depth, if at all.The recent bankruptcy of MCI WorldCom highlights some of the risks inherent in a world economy where customers and companies (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Globalization, Ethics, and Opportunism: A Confucian View of Business Relationships.Edward J. Romar - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (4):663-678.
    Opportunism impacts the behavior of firms in market situations where they purchase goods and services externally and create dependency relationships with other firms. Opportunism as a business issue is addressed in economics and marketing literature as an important factor in transaction cost analysis and market governance. Management and business ethics scholars, however, do not address this issue in depth, if at all.The recent bankruptcy of MCI WorldCom highlights some of the risks inherent in a world economy where customers and companies (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Stakeholder Theory and A Principle of Fairness.Robert A. Phillips - 1997 - Business Ethics Quarterly 7 (1):51-66.
    Stakeholder theory has become a central issue in the literature on business ethics / business and society. There are, however, a number of problems with stakeholder theory as currently understood. Among these are: 1) the lack of a coherent justificatory framework, 2) the problem of adjudicating between stakeholders, and 3) the problem of stakeholder identification. In this essay, I propose that a possible source of obligations to stakeholders is the principle of fairness (or fair play) as discussed in the political (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   134 citations  
  • Stakeholder Legitimacy.Robert Phillips - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (1):25-41.
    This paper is a preliminary attempt to better understand the concept of legitimacy in stakeholder theory. The normative componentof stakeholder theory plays a central role in the concept of legitimacy. Though the elaboration of legitimacy contained hereinapplies generally to all “normative cores” this paper relies on Phillips’s principle of stakeholder fairness and therefore begins with a brief description of this work. This is followed by a discussion of the importance of legitimacy to stakeholder theory as well as the general ambiguity (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   96 citations  
  • New Directions in Strategic Management and Business Ethics.Robert A. Phillips - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):401-425.
    This essay attempts to provide a useful research agenda for researchers in both strategic management and business ethics. We motivate this agenda by suggesting that the two fields started with similar interests, diverged, and are beginning to converge again. We then identify several streams that hold particular promise for developing our understanding of the relationship between strategy and ethics: stakeholder theory, managerial discretion, behavioral strategy, strategy as practice, and environmental sustainability.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Organizational Virtue Orientation and Family Firms.G. Tyge Payne, Keith H. Brigham, J. Christian Broberg, Todd W. Moss & Jeremy C. Short - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (2):257-285.
    This manuscript develops the concept of organizational virtue orientation (OVO) and examines differences between family and non-family firms on the six organizational virtue dimensions of Integrity, Empathy, Warmth, Courage, Conscientiousness, and Zeal. Using content analysis of shareholder letters from S&P 500 companies, our analyses find that there are significant differences between family and non-family firms in their espoused OVO, with family firms generally being higher. Specifically, family firms were significantly higher on the dimensions of Empathy, Warmth, and Zeal, but lower (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • Moral Thinking in Management: An Essential Capability.Lynn Sharp Paine - 1996 - Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (4):477-492.
    This paper argues that moral thinking is an essential management capability which strengthens organizations and contributes to theirperformance in the marketplace. The paper explains what moral thinking is, and addresses the most common reasons for considering it inappropriate or irrelevant to managerial practice. The argument provides a compelling rationale for the corporate ethics initiatives undertaken in recent years.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  • The Influence of Ethical Leadership and Regulatory Focus on Employee Outcomes.Mitchell J. Neubert, Cindy Wu & James A. Roberts - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (2):269-296.
    Regulatory focus theory is proposed as offering an explanation for the influence of ethical leadership on organizational citizenship behaviors and employee commitments. The prevention focus mindset of an employee is argued to be the mechanism by which an ethical leader influences extra-role compliance behavior as well as normative commitment, whereas the promotion focus mindset of an employee is argued to be the mechanism by which an ethical leader influences extra-role voice behavior as well as affective commitment. Moreover, leader-member exchange is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Can Corporations Be Citizens? Corporate Citizenship as a Metaphor for Business Participation in Society.Jeremy Moon, Andrew Crane & Dirk Matten - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (3):429-453.
    This paper investigates whether, in theoretical terms, corporations can be citizens. The argument is based on the observation that thedebate on “corporate citizenship” (CC) has only paid limited attention to the actual notion of citizenship. Where it has been discussed, authors have either largely left the concept of CC unquestioned, or applied rather unidimensional and decontextualized notions of citizenship to the corporate sphere. The paper opens with a critical discussion of a major contribution to the CC literature, the work of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   90 citations  
  • An Ethical Analysis of Hierarchical Relations in Organizations.Dennis J. Moberg - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (2):205-220.
    Ethical analyses of the relations between managers and subordinates have traditionally focused on the employment contract. The inequality and requisite mutual trust between managers and subordinates makes the sub-disciplines of professional ethics and feminist ethics more applicable than the contractarian perspective. When professional ethics is applied to hierarchic relationships, specific obligations emerge for managers and subordinates alike. The application of feminist ethics results in the identification of an entirely different, though not contradictory, set of obligations. In toto, the analysis improves (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Towards Candor, Cooperation, & Privacy in Applied Business Ethics Research: The Randomized Response Technique.Michael B. Metzger - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (2):207-221.
    Virtually every empirical inquiry of issues relevant to applied business ethics involves the asking of questions that are sensitive, embarrassing, threatening, stigmatizing, or incriminating. Accordingly, questions of this sort are likely to result in unsatisfactory outcomes: 1) many individuals will not respond; and/or, 2) many individuals will not respond candidly. An obvious objective, then, is to use a method to collect information which increases participation, provides absolute anonymity, and does not jeopardize subjects' privacy. The randomized response technique is a method (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Getting Real: Stakeholder Theory, Managerial Practice, and the General Irrelevance of Fiduciary Duties Owed to Shareholders.Richard Marens & Andrew Wicks - 1999 - Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (2):273-293.
    Stakeholder theorists have generally misunderstood the nature and ramifications of the fiduciary responsibilities that corporate directors owe their stockholders. This fiduciary duty requires the exercise of care, loyalty, and honesty with regard to the financial interests of stockholders. Such obligations do not conflict with the normative goals of stakeholder theory, nor, after a century of case law that includes Dodge Bros. v. Ford, do fiduciary responsibilities owed shareholders prevent managerial policies that are generous orsensitive to other corporate stakeholders. The common (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  • A Stakeholder–Human Capital Perspective on the Link Between Social Performance and Executive Compensation.Peter M. Madsen & John B. Bingham - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (1):1-30.
    ABSTRACT:The link between firm corporate social performance and executive compensation could be driven by a sorting effect, or by an incentive effect. Existing empirical work focuses exclusively on the incentive effect. In contrast, in this paper we explore the sorting effect of firm CSP on the initial compensation of newly hired executives. In doing so, we develop a novel theoretical approach based on an integration of stakeholder theory and human capital theory, suggesting a positive association between the initial compensation of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Getting to the Bottom of “Triple Bottom Line”.Chris MacDonald - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (2):243-262.
    In this paper, we examine critically the notion of “Triple Bottom Line” accounting. We begin by asking just what it is that supporters of the Triple Bottom Line idea advocate, and attempt to distil specific, assessable claims from the vague, diverse, and sometimescontradictory uses of the Triple Bottom Line rhetoric. We then use these claims as a basis upon which to argue (a) that what issound about the idea of a Triple Bottom Line is not novel, and (b) that what (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  • Why Saying.Daryl Koehn - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (2):239-268.
    The number of corporate apologies has increased dramatically during the past decade. This article delves into the ethics of apologies offered by chief executive officers (CEOs). It examines ways in which public apologies on the part of a representative (CEO) of a corporate body (the firm) differ from both private, interpersonal apologies, on the one hand, and nation-state/collective apologies, on the other. The article then seeks to ground ethically desirable elements of a corporate apology in the nature or essence of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Confucian Trustworthiness and the Practice of Business in China.Daryl Koehn - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (3):415-429.
    Confucius’s teachings fall under four headings: “culture, moral conduct, doing one’s best, and being trustworthy in what one says” (7/25).1 Trust or, more precisely, being trustworthy, plays a central role in the Confucian ethic. This paper begins by examining the Confucian concept of trustworthiness. The second part of the paper discusses how the ideal of trustworthiness makes itself felt inbusiness practices within China. The paper concludes by raising and addressing several objections to the Confucian emphasis ontrustworthiness.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Workplace Civility: A Confucian Approach.Tae Wan Kim & Alan Strudler - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (3):557-577.
    We argue that Confucianism makes a fundamental contribution to understanding why civility is necessary for a morally decent workplace. We begin by reviewing some limits that traditional moral theories face in analyzing issues of civility. We then seek to establish a Confucian alternative. We develop the Confucian idea that even in business, humans may be sacred when they observe rituals culturally determined to express particular ceremonial significance. We conclude that managers and workers should understand that there is a broad range (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Confucian Ethics and Labor Rights.Tae Wan Kim - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (4):565-594.
    ABSTRACT:In this article I inquire into Confucian ethics from a non-ideal stance investigating the complex interaction between Confucian ideals and the reality of the modern workplace. I contend that even Confucian workers who regularly engage in social rites at the workplace have an internal, Confucian reason to appreciate the value of rights at the workplace. I explain, from a Confucian non-ideal perspective, why I disagree with the presumptuous idea that labor rights are necessarily incompatible with Confucian ideals and values. Specifically, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • The Effect of Organizational Forces on Individual Morality: Judgment, Moral Approbation, and Behavior.Thomas M. Jones & Lori Verstegen Ryan - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):431-445.
    To date, our understanding of ethical decision making and behavior in organizations has been concentrated in the area of moraljudgment, largely because of the hundreds of studies done involving cognitive moral development. This paper addresses the problemof our relative lack of understanding in other areas of human morality by applying a recently developed construct—moral approbation—to illuminate the link between moral judgment and moral action. This recent work is extended here by exploring the effect thatorganizations have on ethical behavior in terms (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  • Value Maximization, Stakeholder Theory, and the Corporate Objective Function.Michael C. Jensen - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (2):235-256.
    Abstract: In this article, I offer a proposal to clarify what I believe is the proper relation between value maximization and stakeholder theory, which I call enlightened value maximization. Enlightened value maximization utilizes much of the structure of stakeholder theory but accepts maximization of the long-run value of the firm as the criterion for making the requisite tradeoffs among its stakeholders, and specifies long-term value maximization or value seeking as the firm’s objective. This proposal therefore solves the problems that arise (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   315 citations  
  • Voluntary Codes of Conduct for Multinational Corporations: Coordinating Duties of Rescue and Justice.Nien-hê Hsieh - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):119-136.
    Abstract: This paper examines the extent to which the voluntary adoption of codes of conduct by multinational corporations (MNCs) renders MNCs accountable for the performance of actions specified in a code of conduct. In particular, the paper examines the ways in which codes of conduct coordinate the expectations of relevant parties with regard to the provision of assistance by MNCs on grounds of rescue or justice. The paper argues that this coordinative role of codes of conduct renders MNCs more accountable (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Voluntary Codes of Conduct for Multinational Corporations: Coordinating Duties of Rescue and Justice.Nien-hê Hsieh - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):119-135.
    This paper examines the extent to which the voluntary adoption of codes of conduct by multinational corporations rendersMNCs accountable for the performance of actions specified in a code of conduct. In particular, the paper examines the ways in which codes of conduct coordinate the expectations of relevant parties with regard to the provision of assistance by MNCs on grounds of rescue or justice. The paper argues that this coordinative role of codes of conduct renders MNCs more accountable for the performance (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Does Global Business Have a Responsibility to Promote Just Institutions?Nien-hê Hsieh - 2009 - Business Ethics Quarterly 19 (2):251-273.
    Drawing upon John Rawls’s framework in The Law of Peoples, this paper argues that MNEs have a responsibility to promote well-ordered social and political institutions in host countries that lack them. This responsibility is grounded in a negative duty not to cause harm. In addition to addressing the objection that promoting well-ordered institutions represents unjustified interference by MNEs, the paper provides guidance for managers of MNEs operating in host countries that lack just institutions. The paper argues for understanding corporate responsibility (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   66 citations  
  • The Weirdest People in the World?Joseph Henrich, Steven J. Heine & Ara Norenzayan - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):61-83.
    Behavioral scientists routinely publish broad claims about human psychology and behavior in the world's top journals based on samples drawn entirely from Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic (WEIRD) societies. Researchers assume that either there is little variation across human populations, or that these are as representative of the species as any other population. Are these assumptions justified? Here, our review of the comparative database from across the behavioral sciences suggests both that there is substantial variability in experimental results across (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   629 citations  
  • Beyond WEIRD: Towards a Broad-Based Behavioral Science.Joseph Henrich, Steven J. Heine & Ara Norenzayan - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):111-135.
    In our response to the 28 (largely positive) commentaries from an esteemed collection of researchers, we (1) consolidate additional evidence, extensions, and amplifications offered by our commentators; (2) emphasize the value of integrating experimental and ethnographic methods, and show how researchers using behavioral games have done precisely this; (3) present our concerns with arguments from several commentators that separate variable from or ; (4) address concerns that the patterns we highlight marking WEIRD people as psychological outliers arise from aspects of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • Reconciliation in Business Ethics: Some Advice From Aristotle.Edwin M. Hartman - 2008 - Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (2):253-265.
    It may be nearly impossible to use standard principles to make a decision about a complex ethical case. The best decision, say virtue ethicists in the Aristotelian tradition, is often one that is made by a person of good character who knows the salient facts of the case and can frame the situation appropriately. In this respect ethical decisions and strategic decisions are similar. Rationality plays a role in good ethical decision-making, but virtue ethicists emphasize the importance ofintuitions and emotions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations