Authors
Jon Williamson
University of Kent
Abstract
The EBM+ programme is an attempt to improve the way in which present-day evidence-based medicine assesses causal claims: according to EBM+, mechanistic studies should be scrutinised alongside association studies. This paper addresses two worries about EBM+: that it is not feasible in practice, and that it is too malleable, i.e., its results depend on subjective choices that need to be made in order to implement the procedure. Several responses to these two worries are considered and evaluated. The paper also discusses the question of whether we should have confidence in medical interventions, in the light of Stegenga's arguments for medical nihilism.
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References found in this work BETA

Science, Policy, and the Value-Free Ideal.Heather Douglas - 2009 - University of Pittsburgh Press.
Medical Nihilism.Jacob Stegenga - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
Making Medical Knowledge.Miriam Solomon - 2015 - Oxford University Press.

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Citations of this work BETA

Applying Evidential Pluralism to the Social Sciences.Yafeng Shan & Jon Williamson - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 11 (4):1-27.

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